(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual reports"








326 

A 

N 
N 
U 
A 
L 



th 



M 



R 
E 


E 


P 

O 
J? 


D 


Ja. 

T 


F 


OF THE 




T 


I 


O 




W 

N 


E 


O 
F 


I. 


F 
I 
C 


D 


E 




R 




S 




For the Year Ending 
December 31, 1976 



Rm I 



Bom 

Kuth FvuuUd 



Row II Khcdode.ndxon Swamp 
Jeiw Co it 

Kcic III Soot/i Stieet School 
Madttcim Haiding 



Salt Box Hoa6e 
Rat*i FcAmtdd 

Saptiit ChuAch 
Amia C£anc(/ 

La Linda TucfeeA 



Icentennial Quilt 

Hannah Adam6 

LucUlz Hiddl&iiwUh 
UauAa BuAfec 
Jean We^oAe 

TombA^one 

(F-iAi-t Hinl&teA] 
SeXty SpauZding 
Etinon VoAk 

TavdAn 

knna Clancy 



fvut School 

Etinol PoAfe 

UnAJCa/Uan Chu/ ich 
Gnact B^dge 

UonXh End School 
Etinon. PoAk 



Hannah Adami Homz 
PatAA.cia Hennuiy 

Rocky liloodi In ItlinteA 
MoAgcuiet WcA.iu,tock 



Old UmeM Hoaiz 
Edna hlewtU Ha&bzneA 



R«o 11/ 


Rocky Woodi in 




SujmeA 




Rath BaldiMJi 


RouV 


BaxXzA VoAk 




EtuioK Pank 
Be^tty Spaaldlng 


Rom I/I 


"Veath SfUdgz" 




Vonna SuJULivan 


Rw t/II 


SVujM Factory 



ConglzgationaZ t^zdj-izZd ToMn 
ChuAch Sea£ 

Voili KdUxVi lady Plough 

Vouth CzntiA Tha Peafe Hoa6e 

CoAol Robiyibon Be.cUAA.cz Bang-i 

EpiMcopal ChuAch Wlllom 

Etinoi PoAk BeJXy SpauZding 

HdnAy \dami Houaz Indian 



Voiothy LuUlz 
SandAjOL Shoit 



Joan CuuttzA 



RuXh fzAnald 
Judy Plough 



St. EdmAd'i 
ChuAch 

\nna Clancy 

The Tow n Hou^z 

Joy ColX 

CloAb. Houiz 

PoixLinz CoaltzA 
HzZzn fiAhzA 

Von.k 7actoAy 

Joannz GoazouZe^ 
EJXzzn StAizA 



M zd(,izZd Town Pound 

Vtbna Colt 
Th z GU&t UM 
Joy ColX 

Moon HiU 
CoAol Robin&on 

Tn.olZzy 
Joan Otlando 



The Medfield Quilt 

The quilt was made in 1975 and 1976 for the Bicentennial Year of our country 
and the 325th celebration of the founding of the Town of Medfield. 

Thirty-one women, ranging in age from sixteen to eighty-one, participated in 
putting together the applique quilt. The work was done by the Bicentennial 
Quilt Committee under the co-chairmanship of Joy E. Colt and Polly Coulter. 
It has been donated to the Town and will be on display at the Memorial Public 
Library. 



Cover Photo by Tobey J. E. Reed 



326th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FORTHE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1976 



Digitized by tlie Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1976medf 



SURVEY CONDUCTED BY THE MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Library Trustees and Staff are conducting a survey to find out if your 
needs are met by present library services, book, collection and physical plant. 
Please help us evaluate by filling out this form. Return it either to 
TOWN MEETING on April 25 or to the MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY by APRIL 30. 
(Or to any local MEDFIELD CHURCH) 

IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO SIGN YOUR NAME 

1. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 

A. Age: 18-30; 30 - 50; ^over 50. 

B. Sex: ; female. Occupation 



C. Education: (check highest level) , Sr. High 

Trade School; ^College graduate; ^Post graduate. 

D. How long have you lived in Medfield? 

E. Are you a parent of (check all applicable) : ^Preschool; 

^Elementary; ^Junior High; Senior High. 

II. USE OF THE LIBRARY 

A. Do you use the Medfield Public Library? ^yes ; No 

B. If yes, how often? ^Daily; ^Weekly; Monthly; 

Several times a year; Other (specify) 



C. Do you use the library more for: recreational reading; 

educational purposes; ^Both; ^Other (explain) ^ 

D. If you do not use the library, why not? ^Do not like to read; 

D o not have time to read; Do not like the books in collection 

Do not have enough books on subjects I like; 

Other (explain) 



E. What other libraries do you use and why? 



F. If you use the Medfield Public Library, please check all the kinds 
of books and services you use. 

^Fiction N on-fiction Magazines 

^Newspapers _^__ ^Records ^Photocopier 

M useum passes _____ Art print ^Children's Room 

^College Catalogs Large print books Interlibrary 

Loan Books 



G. Do you think the book collection is large enough? ^Yes; _^ ^No. 

H. If not, in which areas do you feel it needs to be strengthened? 

Biography ^Literature ^Fiction 

History ^Reference ^Hobbies/handicrafts 

Science ^Psychology Children's Room 

^Current events ^Business/technology ^Other 

LIBRARY HOURS (As of July 1, 1977 the library plans to open mornings 
from 10 - 12 noon in addition to the regular 1-9 p.m. hours.) 

Do you feel any additional hours are necessary? Sunday (2-5 p.m.) 

^Evening hours in the children's room; Other 



IV. LIBRARY SERVICES 



Do you think the library is giving the kini^s of services the citizens 

need within the present space and budgetary limitations? Yes; 

^No. If not, what are your suggestions? 

Which of the following services would you use/enjoy if available? 

^Listening area for records Sheet music for piano/guitar 

Microfilm reader for magazines ^Exhibits 

^Typewriter for public use ^Delivery service to homebound 

F ilm projector for groups _Other (explain) 

LIBRARY PROGRAMS 

A. What types of programs would you attend if available at the 
library? 

^Book discussion group ^Demonstrations of crafts, 

etc. 

Speakers O ther (explain) 

Films "~" 



B. Do you think the programs in the children's room are adequate? 
^Yes; No. If not, explain 



C. Would you like to have a Story Hour session for 3 year olds? 
^Yes; ^No; ^Have no children this young. 

VI . LI BRARY STAF F 

A. Do you find the staff courteous and helpful? ^Yes; No. 

B. Do they seem knowledgeable about the book collection? ^Yes ; ^No. 

VII. LIBRARY ADDITION Would you like to have an addition to the library 

Euilding? [[^ _Yes; No. Would you support any of the below 

items to finance an addition? List preferences in order by 
indicating 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. 

^Federal funds Local taxes 

^Revenue sharing Combination of items 

^ Fund raising Other (explain) 

If the building is expanded, check which of the following you would 
like to have included? 

^Community meeting room Air conditioning 

^Study carrels in quiet area Other (comment) 



VIII. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY Would you be interested in belonging to a 
Friends of the Library group to help with library programming and 

fund raising? ^Yes ; No. If yes, please fill out sheet on back 

of this form and return separately. 

Please use the remaining space to make further coiriments, suggestions 
or criticisms not covered in the survey. 



I would be interested in joining the Friends of the Library. 

NAME (Print) 

ADDRESS 

TELEPHONE 



SPECIAL TOim IIEETING 
Amos Clark Kingsbury School Tuesday, April 26, 1977, 7:30 p.m. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the To\m will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by easement, gift, purchase or eminent domain for landfill expansion lots 
31 and 32 on map 48 of the Medfield Assessors' Maps, to appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of this article and to determine in what manner the money shall be 
raised, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

The first five articles in this warrant relate to the expansion of the 

existing landfill. This xvrill involve closing a portion of Grove Street 

beginning at Route 27 to the back of the Legion property, abandoning 

the street and excavating and filling this area. A more complete report will 

be given at the toxTO meeting. This article involves acquiring two parcels 

of property between Route 27 and Grove Street which are approximately 

opposite the present entrance to the landfill. This article will cost $10,700. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of providing 
engineering services and development costs for the expansion of the sanitary landfill, 
or take,aa^^);4p.nj:ejL^fe4p.@_^^,g,£o_,_^^ 

(Board of Selectmen) 

Includes funds for preparation of an operational plan as required by the 
Commonwealth and funds to implement that plan, including fencing, landscaping and 
excavating. $60,000. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Toxra will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of installing a 12" water line 
on West Mill Street and to make such other improvements to the water system in the 
West Mill, West Street area as may be required by this installation, or take any 
action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen 

tJhen the portion of Grove Street is abandoned, an alternate route to bring water 
:» ■ to the area must be found. This article would connect 12" lines on West Mill 
Street, and in addition to continuing the water supply in this area, would 
improve the supply to our industrial areas. $15,000. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding to 
Section 2, "Definitions", the following; 

2.1.32 (a) Municipal Use - The use of any building, facility, or area 
owned or leased ana operated by the Town of Medfield for the general use 
and welfare of the Tovm, its Inhahitantsi or businesses located within the 
Tovm 

and by deleting from Sectiorr"5, "Use Regulations" clauses 5.4.2.65 5.4.2.7; 
5.4. 2. Hi 5.4.2.12; and 5.4.2.13 

and by adding clause 5.4.2.17, "Municipal Use", requiring a Special Permit in all 
Zoning Districts; 

or take any action relative thereto. (Board pf Selectmen) 



2. 

In order to use this expanded site for landfill purposes, it is necessary 
to establish a zoning category for municipal use. At the present time, 
this area is zoned residential which does not perpiit operation of a landfill. 
The existing site is permissible as a nonconforming use. Requires 2/3 vote. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to abandon a portion of Grove Street 
from North Meadows Road and extending in a northwesterly direction for a distance 
of approximately 870 feet to the property line of the Beckwith Post No. 110, 
American Legion, Inc., or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

As mentioned above, a portion of Grove Street v/ill be abandoned, e,Ki;Qvgsfe<id .arid 
filled. To do this, it is necessary to abandon the street taking which is on 
• I'lf file in the Registry. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Toxm will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
in what manner the appropriation will be met for the purpose of purchasing equipment 
for the Street Department as listed and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part 
of the purchase price equipment to be replaced; 

To be Ac quired Trad_e 



1. Street Sweeper 1969 Wayne Sweeper 

2. 2-yard Front End Loader 1970 Hough 60 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

^ (Street, Water & Sevrer Department) 

Normally this equipment is requested in an article in the annual town meeting. 
However^ this would not allow purchase of the equipment until after July 1st. 
The present condition of the equipment is so bad that v;e might incur con- 
siderable repair cost to keep then going until that time. By requesting 
these items in the special town meeting, we can purchase them as soon as the 
special town meeting is over. The Highway Department has prepared bids. $72,000. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to purchase or otherwise acquire, and will authorize the Selectmen to take by 
eminent domain, upon the written request of the Conservation Commission, for 
conservation i>tirposes, including outdoor recreation as provided by Section 3C 
of Chapter 40 of the General Lax-js, as amended, any fee, easement or conservation 
restriction as defined in Section 31 of Chapter 184 of the General Laws, or other 
interest in land shown as lot 2, map 20 of the Medfield Assessors' Maps, now or 
formerly of Charles H. Weeber, Jr., vote to appropriate a sum of m^giey for the purposes 
of this article and determine whether the money shall be provided by borrowing or 
otherwise 5 vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen or Conservation Commission to 
apply for and receive any Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be available; 
or take any action relative thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 
This parcel at the intersection of Causeway Street and Noon Hill Road was 
excluded from the original acquisition. It is about the only undeveloped 
piece of land in the area that remains in private ownership. The Town Intends 
<r^ to file for 50% State reimbursement. $23,000. 



ARTICLE 8, To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available 
funds for the purpose of resurfacing the parking lot at the Fire Station, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

This would provide for the purchase of approximately 100 tons of asphalt 
to resurface the Fire Station driveways and parking lot which has begun 
to crack. Resurfacing at this time would arrest further deterioration and 
prevent water from getting underneath the asphalt and freezing. $2,000. 

ARTICLE^g. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the fqllowing re^ol^tion^^ ^^ 

WHEREAS: Compulsory and binding arbitration for police and fire 
negotiations has been shovm to undercut severely the powers of 
• home rule by requiring an outside arbitrator to choose the final 
settlement; 

AND ITOEREAS: The effect of the trial period of this law has been to 
undermine effective collective bargaining.; 

AND WHEREAS: This law has contributed significantly to higher local 
budgets and increased property taxes by raising the level of all local 
wage settlements i 

NOW THEREFORE: Be it resolved that the Medfield Town Meeting hereby votes 
to convey to the Governor and our elected state representatives and senators • 
our desire that there be no extension of compulsory and binding arbitration 
beyond its termination date of June 30, 1977, so that final authority for deter- 
mining local expenditures be returned to town meeting. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

Submitted at the request of the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association &• Massa- 
chusetts League of Cities and Towns. The original binding arbitration bill was 
passed for a three-year trial period. If it is not renewed this summer, it will 
expire* While this bill has not had a direct impact on Medfield, it has created 
. _ _hayoc inother cities and, towns, and .has, resulted in large collective bargaining 
settlements and an erosion of management control. It also represents an 
undermining of the principle of local home rule. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen to borrow a sum of money allotted or to be allotted by the 
State for the purpose of constructing North Street between Main Street and Frairy 
Street, and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into any and all necessary 
contracts for that, piiipose, or do o^r a.ct anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

The Legislature is presently considering a special bond issue for highway 
aid.. If passed, it would appropriate $27, 976. for reimbursement to Medfield 
for highway construction costs. This article authorizes borrov7ing of these 
funds in anticipation of State reimbursement and the funds could be used for 
installation of old fashioned street lighting and brick sidewalks, as well as . 
for reconstruction of the street surface. 



sa^i^iSii.i^j«. 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
the method by which the appropriation will be met for the purposes of preparing a 201 
facility plan undate, as required by the Massachusetts Division of VJater Pollution 
Control and the Environmental Protection Agency by mandate in the implementation •> 
schedule of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit, to study 
increased treatment and plant enlargement for a,) Medfield alone, dnd b.) Medfield, 
Millis and Cott flows combined, and to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to 
enter into agreements with the State and Federal Governments for the purpose of 
accenting. Federal , ancL .St^^. graAtg,,or. jr^i^^rsements j;heref or ^or^.take__any action 
relative thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

In order to qualify for future federal and state sev/er grants, the town must 
v:.>. prepare a facility update plan outlining future steps to be taken to improve • 

and/or expand our sewer system. A major portion of these funds would be reim- : 
bursable. Among items to be addressed in the facility plan will be the proposed 
tie-in of Millis to our treatment .plant <. $35,000. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town x^rill vote to transfer from available funds and/or 
borrow a sum of money for the purpose of making a water reconnaissance survey by means 
of test wells and making a prolonged ppmping test by means of an 8" test well in the 
Mine Brook area in order to find and get State approval of a potable water supply, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

The update of the master plan for water identified potential water supplies 
in the town. This survey would provide for the installation of test trells to 
determine whether these sites are feasible for development as additional water 
supplies. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and/or 
borrow a sum of money for the purpose of engineering and preliminary work required 
for preparation of bids for construction of a 1.5 million gallon standpipe on Mt. 
Nebo and a 12'' vzater main from the standpipe in a northerly direction to Main Street, 
or t§ke any^g^^on xelating ther,et£W>-~ »-. — ^ ^,^„_, ...... .^~.^ ...- 

'^'~" '—"—--"— -»*•—»- ' ' ■- '"" ' l^sit^er and^ ^ewerd^^'ioardT^ ~ " ~^^ "" 

Provides funds for preliminary engineering of a standpipe on Mt. Nebo and a 
connecting 12'' line from Mt. Nebo to Main Street to maintain adequate pressure 
in our water distribution system. $35,000. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Tovm will vute to transfer fLom available funds a sum of 
money for the purponfe of constructing a i'2' Tr^ater main in VJest Street 'from the 
westerly end of the exiBtinc main for apiiroximntely 500' to the easterly end of a 12" 
water main at Station #24 in West' Street laid by others, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

This would connect the water supply from the Bridge Street area up West Street 
and across Route 27. A developer has installed a 12'' line as required by the 
town to serve houses V7hiclh he has built on West Street. This would complete 
that 12" line out to Route 27. $20,000. ' 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of Positions 
& Pay Schedules to include the following positions under Full Time: 



Salaried Positions 



Minimum 



Police Department 

Chief $15,170. $24,223. 

Board of Health " 



Youth Counsellor - 10,500. 

and to add under Hourly Grade Listings: 

Grade G: Senior Accounts Clerk 

and further to see if the Toxm will amend the Personnel Administration Plan by adding 
a new sentence to section 6. "Types of Employment'' to read as follows: 

"Employees except those on shift assignments will be compensated for 
the number of hours actually worked." 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



Inserts three new positions in the classification plan, one for the Police Chief 
reflecting 1.8 times the police officer's salary as required by the Police/Fire 
Chief's salary statute, one for the Youth Counsellor under the Outreach Program 
and one for Senior Accounts Clerk as part of a reclassification in the 
Executive Secretary's budget. The inclusion of the Youth Counsellor is 
necessary only if the tovm elects to take over the program completely rather 
than continue it on a contract basis. The other portion of this article is a 
technical correction to the by-^law-relafring- ta-the work schedule for office 
personnel. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Tovm will vote to allow the Water and Seijerage Board to 
proof^^H with preliTm'nary negotiations and preparations of a draft agreement with the 
Town of Mil Us lor sewage disposal in Medfield, that will be henfificial to the Town 
of Medfield, for preBontntion at a public informatnon meeting, all prior to being 
voted on by the people at either a Sperinl T.-w,, ^footing, or at a future Annual Town 
T/Io<-i-ine„ w f-nV^. r>ny ant-ir^n vote.*- i^^<. *-1-.prcto . 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

Continued authorization for the Water & Sewerage Board to negotiate with Millis 
on a proposed tie-in. 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or borrow, 
and/or transfer a sura of money for the purpose of installing storm drainage in 
Forest Street approximately 500 feet southwesterly of High Street and to further 
authorize the Selectmen, in the name of the Tovm, to take by eminent domain such 
drainage easements as may be necessary for the aforesaid, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

_A re sident petition requesting..corr.e,ctic)ia of .a flooding prot^lem o|}u.Forest 
Street. $12,550. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Tmm will vote to amend its Zoning By-laws and Zoning I"Iap 
by changing from Residence A to a Business District the following described property: 

A certain parcel of land situat^ed on the northerly side of Main Street (Route 
109) and the westerly side of North Meadow Road (Route 27) in Medfield, Norfolk County, 
Massachusetts and containing 98,852 square feet (2.27 acres), more or less; 

Beginning at a point being a concrete bound on the northerly sideline of the 
said Main Street and a distance of 370.88 feet westerly from a Massachusetts Highway 
Bound at the point of courvature (sic) to the said North Meadow Road; thence S 70 
24' 00'' W along the northerly sideline of the said Main Street to a concrete bound a 
distance of 99.92 feet; thence by land of Alfred J. & Joan M. OuffH^tte by three lines 
respectively; N 24° 00' 17^' W a distance of 174.50 feet, N 20" 29' 10" W a distance of 
250.00 feet, N 42° 29' 10" W a distance of 174,82 feet, to a concrete bound; thence by 
land of Robert R, Palson Estate by three lines respectively; N 49 04' 45" E a 
distance of 128.23 feet to a concrete bound, N 62° 49' 43" E a distance of 110.74 feet 
to an iron road (sic), N 28° 39' 25" E a distance of 28.55 feet to a concrete bound 
on the westerly sideline of the said North Meadow Road; thence S 43° 06' 35" E along 
the westerly sideline of the said North Meadow Road a distance of 220.00 feet to a 
concrete bound; thence by land of John, Jr. and George H, Basile by two lines 
respectively, N 48° 06' 55" W a distance of 0.17 feet, S 31° 12' 33" W a distance of 
188.23 feet to a concrete bound; thence by land of George E. and Phyllis R. Noona (sic), 
Jr. by three lines respectively, S 33° 44' 51" W a distance of 97,22 feet to a 
concrete bound, S 24° 39' 11" E a distance of 268.61 feet to a concrete bound by a 
curve to the left of which the radius Is 30. 00 feet a distance of 44.48 feet to the 
point, gf^ beginning, _ _. „ ,-„., .-, 

(Petition) 

A resident petition requesting rezonlng of land along Route 27 adjacent to the 
recently constructed shopping center to pormlf- oonstiuction of additional stores. 
The area is presently zoned reslrl<=>ntifll. 

NOTE? The above ris-.t-. .. ■-- ^ k,..,,i ..«» ;m..( <-.-, .u- j hv; Lime of this writing and 



o 
o 

c 



c 

•H 
0) 

<n 



CO 

CvJ 

c c 

O -H 

e «H 

fH 

O U 
CO 

e c 

to O 
(U <u 

U CO 

CC O 

•H a 
>-^ u 

o a 
u 

a ^ 

CO 4-> 

o u 

4J o 

<U 

O <L) 
> CO 

.H CO 

rH ^ 
•H 

^ 0) 

I- 

O n^ 

H CO 

QJ CO 



4-J >^ 
C 
d CO 
•H 

0) 
O (0 
CO 

?^ u 

CO o 

+J o 
CO 'H 

:5 4-. 

CO 

0) rH 
■U CO 

u 

O CO 

•H 
CO 
*J CO 

C -H 

e >«-» 

cu 

> >^ 
O XI 
U 

6 <D 
•H V^ 



3 
cr 
CD 
U 



3 

14-4 CO 
•H 

O •H 
Q> CO 
CO CO 



u 

3 >^ 
CO CO 

e 
(1) 

^ CO 
CO CO 
B 

CO 
O G> 
*-» J-i 

CO 

C u 

CO (U 
O 

4J U 

o cn 



o 



W 
-J 

u 

M 
H 
fir;. 



>-t CO CO 
CO -H ^ 

e X:^ rH 



CO CO n:; 

CO 

c 0) 



< -H o :s 



0) 
M 

to 



B 
u 
o 

rH 



T3 

CO 
O 



U 

0) 
4^ 

CO rH 
^ rH 

•H 

60 X! tj 

•H 4J P 
J-i CO O 



C CO 

O Q) 
U 

CO CO 
0) 

C CO 

•H -H 



0) 4-» 



CO CvJ 

C rH 

o 

0) 

C 
C O 
CO U 



CO 



^ ^3 

o :5 

a cu 

CO rH 

rO a 

CO 'H 

4J 

CO U 

•H CO 

+J CO 

0) 'H 

CD ^ 

M H 

C/D 

<D TJ 

> C 

O 13 

P O 

O M-i 

o rn 

C 4J 

O CO 

o 



a o 

:? o 

CO <^ 

in 

{-• rH 

CO 
O cc 



a ,- 

'H cc 

:3 -n 

•H 4J 

4J O 

C :: 

o X 

o (2 



u V. 



CO 
O CO 

CD 



Ct i-» 



> 
o 

J-4 

a. 

e 

12- -U CO -H 



60 
C 
•H 

CO 

CO 
PQ 

a 

•H 
C! 
O 

0) 

e 

CO 



O C 
rH O 



15 O 

§ (U 

O Jd 

H 4J 

0) - 

x: r 

4J CO 

<4-l O 



0) -H 

CO "H 

O CU 

H Q 



v^ CN 



^ C 

U -r- 

M 4J 

H CJ 

(^ Q) 



a) Si 

CO -u 

CO C 

(U rH 'H 

}-< CO ^ 

CO M -P 

(U -H 

M d :5 

O 0) 

60 TI! 

OS ci; 

•U JC ct 

•H +J CJ 

tH 

•H V^ r-< 

u o 

CO M^ CO 

MH a 

•X3 Q 

" rH CO 

60 (U d 



XJ TJ 

rH cu 
^ 4H 

o 
>> 

CO 

MH 

o 

CO 

0) 

H 



o 

EH 

0) 

Xi 

4J 
Ct 



a. 





4J 



CO X 



CO 



CNJ 

CO nd 
. 0) 



CsJ O 



0) 

CO 
U-* 

rO 



CM 

in 

Cvi 

<r 

CO 
/ CO 

■ :3 
- CO 



■' CO 
' CO 

'■ P 

> 60 
% Q) 

■ CU 
• CO 

Ap 

C'^ CO 

.in • 

a -> 

' o <J- 

•H . 

4J m 
■ a 

<U XJ 

O »■• 

U c^ 

^ rH 

60 Cv| 

c • 

•H <r 

. u • 

J (D in 

Q) -'^ 

.X> rH 

>s " 

^ CvJ 

XJ ^d- 

Ci • 

(0 m 



0) 

PL, 



o 

a. 

C/3 



3 
<u 






c^ 



in 

(U 
CO 

CO 



60 



CO 



X) 
XJ 
CO Q 

>^ 60 

•H 
XJ C 

a o 

CO tsl 



(Uv 

e 

4J 

a. 

(U 

rH 
(U. 

cn- 

m ' 
a 

x> 

?^ 



(U 

<L) 
> 



a 

CO 
CO 
CO 




The 1976 Annual Town Report is hereby 
dedicated to Miss Laura Huntington Smith, 
who is descended from several of the original 
settlers of Medfield, and who has contributed 
generously to our town as a teacher in the 
Medfield School Department, a Trustee of the 
Memorial Public Library, charter member of the 
Historical Commission, member of our Charter 
Commission and through whose dedicated efforts 
much of our history has been preserved. 



INMEMORIAM 



ANNE C. DONLAN 
Trustee, Public Library 1935 - 1961 

GEORGE A. GAGLIANI, M.D. 
Board of Health 1966 - 1969 

HAROLD A. MCKAY 
Board of Public Welfare 1945 - 1947 

JOHN H. ROSKILLY, JR. 
Finance Committee 1959 - 1965 



HARRY J. WEBB 

Selectman 1922 - 1925 

Warrant Committee 1925 - 1928 

Board of Health 1925 - 1928 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1976 
Assessed Valuation 1976: 
Tax Rate: 



1/1/76 - 6/30/76 
7/1/76 - 6/30/77 



10,231 

$72,780,545.00 

61.50 
61.70 



Area: 14,43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway: 61.77 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



Representative to Congress - 



Governor's Councillor 



State Senator 



State Representative 



United States Senators: 



Margaret M. Heckler 
30 Colbum Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

George F. Cronin, Jr. 
58 Cerdan Avenue 
Boston, Mass. 

David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

George R. Sprague 
5 Powderhouse Lane 
Sherbom, Mass. 

Edward W. Brooke 

J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Mass. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building 

Boston, Mass. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Ralph C. Copeland 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



Term expires 1977 



Nancy J. Preston 



Term expires 1979 



TREASURER 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



Term expires 1978 



SELECTMEN 



Harry A. Kelleher 
R. Edward Beard 
William R. Reagan 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



ASSESSORS 



Roger E. Hardy 
Melville J. Mills 
Joseph S. Kennedy 



Thomas McMurtrie 
Barrel R. Bates 
Phillip J. Burr 
John C. Rudisill 
Dawn I. Austin 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



James F. Barton 
David Wilmarth 
Ann B. Thompson * 
Deborah L. Storrs * 
Mary Ellen Donahue 
Barbara A. Houck, Resigned 
Thomas Anastasi, Resigned 
Jane M. Guthrie 

* elected to fill unexpired term 



Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 



Term expires 1977 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Michael J. Sullivan Term expires 1977 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 



William E. McCarthy 



Richard H. Whelan 
Francis X. Curry 
Thomas A. Caragliano 



Peter C. O'Brien 
Joseph A. Roberts 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr, 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



Bruce 0. Tobiasson 

Leland D. Beverage 

John D. Williams 

John A. Rose, Jr., Associate Member 



TREE WAJU)EN 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1977 



Ellis N. Allen 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Ellis N. Allen Term expires 1977 

FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 



Herbert B. Burr 
Rebel L. Palumbo 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 



Wilbur M. Salter 

William J. Jennet te. Assistant 



Roy Owen 



William J. Jennette 



POUND KEEPER 



DOG OFFICER 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1977 



PLANNING BOARD 



Sandra G. Munsey 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Donald J. MacDonald 
C. Richard McCullough 
Robert J. Larkin 



Arthur F. McEvoy, Resigned 
Barbara F. Maliff 
Richard E. Nickerson * 
Eric W. O'Brien 
Genie T. Roberts 
Warren F. Sheard 
Richard DeSorgher 
William J. Heller 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



* elected to fill unexpired term 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 



Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 



Hazel R. Frank, State Appointed 

Raymond D. Cynewski * 

Peter A. Gaines * 

Bruce J. Oravec, Resigned 

Michael Tammero 

Dorothy Anastasi 

Lawrence M. O'Dell, Resigned 

* elected to fill unexpired term 



Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1980 


Term 


expires 


1981 



FIRE CHIEF 

Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 



E. Nina lafolla 



George W. Kingsbury 



PATROLMEN 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



Patrick J. Caulfield 
Edward J. Farioli, Resigned 
Joseph P. Flaherty, Jr. , Resigned 



Russell N. Mulgrew, Resigned 

David S. Sloan 

Gregory Tanger, Resigned 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
George E. Nye 



8 



ASSISTANT DOG OFFICER 



Ruth S. Luke 



Term expires 1977 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Michael Tanmero 



Term expires 1977 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



J. Hardy Henderson 



Term expires 1977 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



Richard A. Ellsworth 



Term expires 1977 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 

James R. Bassett, Assistant 

Robert E. Kennedy, Assistant 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 



CONSTABLES 



Peter Bartkewicz 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey 
E. Nina lafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 



George W. Kingsbury 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naught on 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



KEEPERS OF THE LOCK-UP 



Anthony A. Bertone 

Richard D. Bishop 

Robert W. Brady 

Patrick J. Caulfield, Jr. 

Patrick W. Clancy 

John T. Garvey 

E. Nina lafolla 

Ronald E. Kerr 

Gregory Tanger, Resigned 



George W. Kingsbury 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naught on 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
David S. Sloan 
Raymond J. I'Theeler 



PROVISIONAL INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



George W. Hinkley, III 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G. V. Taylor 



POLICE INTERNS 



Michael J. Cellucci 
Robert Clodi 
Robert C. Gallo 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Prlscilla Mahoney 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie E. St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


1977 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Michael Alberta 
James 0. Aronson 
Albert Baima 
Clayton M. Balcom 
Stephen E. Bassett 
R. Edward Beard 
Donald J. Bickel 
Leo M. Brennan 
James Brown 
Chester A. Burks 
Herbert B. Burr 
Herbert L. Burr 
James Campbell 
Richard Cantrell 
William Carlson 
Herbert Carr 
Edward Carreiro 
Joseph Carvahlo 
Michael J. Cellucci 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Mario R. Centamore, Jr. 
Clinton M. Clark 
Paul Conant 
Joseph Concannon 
Michael J. Donahue 
Kenneth W. Dunbar 
Robert Eklund 
David C. Egy 
Richard Ellsworth 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Dana P. Friend 
John P. Geraghty 
Robert R. Grover 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 
George W. Hinkley, III 
Paul Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 
John Holmes 
William J. Jennette 



William D. Jones 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Timothy M. Kleczek 
John Kubacki 
Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 
Alfred Leverone 
Warren Maloney 
Thomas W. McNeeley, Jr. 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
William Meau 
Hugh Mick 
George P. Michel 
Frank S. Newell, Jr. 
James Padula 
Rebel Palumbo 
Mario Pederzini 
Harold Pritoni 
William R. Reagan 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Walter F. Reynolds, Sr. 
David Riggs 
Warren Robinson 
Joel Rosenfeld 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Robert Sessa 
David M. Sexton 
George St. Pierre 
George E. Smith, Jr. 
Carl Sheridan 
Ronald A. Taddeo 
Robert D. Taylor 
Robert G. V. Taylor 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
Joel Udstuen 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 
Edmund Waitkevich 
Thomas Ward 
Thomas Watson 



10 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS-SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



Allan K. Belcher 
Russell A. Devereau 
Tassos P. Filledes 
Arnold U. Giard 
John T. Grover 
Vincent Hallowell 
Frank J. Hoffman 



Douglas Ide 
Howard L. Kilmer 
John McGrath 
James H. Morris 
James E. Morris 
James W. O'Connell 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER-CORNING GLASS 



John Mortz 
SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS-MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



Herbert Bennett 
Elwin Graves 
Joseph Harkins 
Donald H. Lee 
Edward Mahan 



William J. Marchand, Jr. 
Robert McGrath 
Leo J. Prince 
John Walsh 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Term expires April 1977 



TOWN COUNSEL 



John F. St. Cyr, Resigned 
Charles Fuller, Jr. 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



Paul F. Curran 



VETERANS' AGENT 



VETERANS' DIRECTOR 



Term expires 1977 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1977 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



G. Marshall Chick 



Term expires 1977 



BURIEL AGENT 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1977 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



John F. Ganley 
Mary MairEtienne 
Beatrice Bangs 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Herbert B. Burr 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



Term expires April 1977 



ASSISTANT INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



Richard Ostrander, Resigned 
Rebel L. Palumbo 



Term expires April 1977 
Term expires April 1977 



11 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

George E. Nye Term expires 1977 

ASSISTANT PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Walter R. Nye Term expires 1977 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

Joseph F. Erskine Term expires 1977 

ASSISTANT WIRING INSPECTOR 

Thomas J. 0' Toole Term expires 1977 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Walter R. Nye Term expires 1977 

ASSISTANT GAS INSPECTOR 

George E. Nye Term expires 1977 

BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING, SUBDIVISION CONTROL 

Robert F. Sylvia Term expires 1977 

James T. Regan Term expires 1978 

William F. Spang Term expires 1979 

James 0. Aronson, Associate Member Term expires 1977 

BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING ENFORCING OFFICER 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. Term expires 1977 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Anthony C. Centore Term expires April 1977 

E. Paul Corkum Term expires April 1978 

Harry C. Merrow Term expires April 1979 

Philip Bonanno Term expires April 1980 

James J. Leonard Term expires April 1981 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Walter M. Frank Term expires 1977 

Truman W. Netherton Term expires 1977 

John 0. Ekstrom, Resigned Term expires 1978 

Norman A. Gray, Jr. Term expires 1978 

George M. Graham, Jr. Term expires 1978 

Donald H. Harding Term expires 1978 

Arnold C. Coda, Resigned Term expires 1979 

William P. Mikelonis Tenri expires 1979 

AMBULANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



William H. Mann James D. Sullivan, M.D. 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. Joseph E. Ryan 



12 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Warren L. Robinson 



Term expires 1977 



DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



John E. Varnum, Jr. 



Term expires 1977 



UNDERWATER RESCUE AND RECOVERY 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 



Term expires 1977 



SHELTER MANAGER 



Constance E. Waite 



Term expires 1977 



DISPATCHER 



Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 



Term expires 1977 



CIVIL DEFENSE MESSENGER 
Donald A. Gottberg 
CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE-SQUAD 1 
John E. Varnum, Jr. , Captain 



James 0. Aronson, Lieutenant 
Vincent M. Cellucci, Lieutenant 
Robert G. Taylor, Master Sergeant 



Mario Pederzini, Sergeant 
Warren L. Robinson, Sergeant 
Robert J. Sessa, Sergeant 



OFFICERS 



Blair Belcher 
Bruce Berry- 
David R. Blackett 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Ghassoub P. Frangie 
Kenneth L. Hedderig 
William J. Jennette 



James T. Kashalena 
J. Michael Roman, Jr. 
Edward Spita 
Herbert Talerman 
Robert D. Taylor 
John E. Varnum, Sr. 
Constance E. Waite 



CIVIL DEFENSE POLICE-SQUAD 2 



Michael J. Cellucci, Sergeant 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr., Sergeant 



David M. Sexton, Sergeant 
Dana P. Friend, Corporal 



OFFICERS 



Harold C. Barr, Jr. 
Albert Brown 
Chester A. Burks 
Ralph W. Chadsey, Jr. 
Robert C. Gallo 
Jonathan E. Gifford 
Daniel J. Hutchinson 



Timothy M. Kleczek 
Thomas M. LaPlante , Jr. 
Edward J. Papsis, Jr. 
Michael Pasquino 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 
Stephen P. Saulnier 



13 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 
Margaret C. Erdlen 
Walter M. Frank 
Lorraine G. Holland 



Allan J. Larkin 
Arthur G. Maguire 
William H. Mann 
William E. McCarthy 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Robert W. MacLeod 

Erwin A. Seidel 

William D. Walsh 

Frederick D. Harrison 

Mario Pederzini 

Jane Minesinger, Associate Member, Resigned 

Alden H. Pember, Associate Member 

Tobey J. E. Reed, Associate Member 



Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 



Harry A. Kelleher 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Richard J. Lyman 



Neal R. Olsen 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Charles A. Doyle, Resigned 
Dorothy Anastasi 
Edwin C. Flaherty 
Alison M. Ulrich 
Virginia Couper 
Barbara Fetteroll 
Genevieve K. Reagan 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Elizabeth L. Martin 
Thomas V. Sweeney, Sr. 



Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


1979 



GROWTH POLICY COMMISSION 



Juliana G. Alasso 
Eleanor Anes 
R. Edward Beard 
Sarsfield Brennan 
Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
Harry A. Kelleher, Resigned 
Jane Minesinger, Resigned 
Sandra G. Munsey 



Bruce J. Oravec, Resigned 

Mario Pederzini 

Carol Shaw 

Alexander J. Smith, Jr. 

Michael Tammero 

Richard H. Whelan 

Robert N. Zabe 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Patricia A. Rioux 
Eleanor Anes 
Ann S. Mentzer 
David L. Wilmarth 
Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
Laura H. Smith 
Burgess P. Standley 
William E. McCarthy, 
William F. McCarthy, 
Donald J. MacDonald, 



Associate Member 
Associate Member 
Associate Member 



Roy A. McQuillan, Associate Member 



Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April, 1977 


Term 


expires 


April, 1977 



14 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMISSION 



Ann M. Brayton 
Barbara A. Cronin, 
Leslie J. Hewlett 



Resigned 



Donald J. MacDonald 
Henrietta M. Maloney 
Ann S. Mentzer 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Woolsey S, 
Robert S. 
Edward J. 



Conover 
Capers, Jr. 
MacDonald 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



LANDFILL SITE SELECTION AND STUDY COMMITTEE 



Thomas A. Caragliano 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Donald J. MacDonald 
William E. McCarthy 
Elmer 0. Portmann 



Hanson C. Robbins 
George L. Robinson 
Steven M. Rudnick 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Albert T. Tray 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE-OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 

POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Griffin 
Marvin W. Kushner 
William H. Mann 



Thomas A. McGinnis 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Sr. 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex officio 



MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Russell A. Devereau 
Loren G. Eaton 



Charles H. Peck 
John C. Rudisill, Jr 
Michael J. Sullivan 



MEDFIELD COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Joan M. Bruno 
Gertrude H. Ehnes 
Ellen E. Gifford 
Doris E. Kellar 



William P. Mikelonis 
Roy Owen 
Mario Pederzini 
Linda F. Whichard 



Michael J. Sullivan 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE ADVISORY BOARD-MBTA 



MEETING HOUSE POND COMMITTEE 



Term expires 1977 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Arnold C. Coda 
Pauline A. Coulter 
William J. Heller 



William E. McCarthy 
Roy A. McQuillan 
Elmer 0. Portmann 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Harry A. Kelleher 



Term expires August 3, 1977 



15 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY NEEDS FOR EXPANSION OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES 



Kenneth F. Hunt 
Thompson S. Lingel 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Alexander J. Smith, Jr. 



Paul H. Snyder 
Robert F. Sylvia 
David L. Wilmarth 
John F. Wissler 



325TH ANNIVERSARY AND SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 



Joseph L. Marcionette, Honorary Chairman 



Pauline A. Coulter 
Robert L. Coulter 
Barbara A. Cronin 
Edward P. Doherty 
Robert E. Dooley 
Gayle N. Edgar 
Ralph C. Good, Jr. 
Pauline M. Goucher 



Beverly L. Hallowell 
William L. Hallowell 
Dorothy S. Kane 
Shirley J. Maples 
Edward A. Otting 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Michael Tammero 
Marie M. Burke, 

Associate Member 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Dawn I. Austin 
R. Edward Beard 
Richard DeSorgher 
Thomas Lennon 
Toby Lomker 
Robert E. Naughton 
Jean Nightingale 
Rev. Paul E. Norcross 
Isabelle Rabe 
Charles Wiggs 



Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1977 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY BOARD OF HEALTH 



INSPECTORS OF SANITATION 



William R. Domey 



John J. Keefe 



BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Jean P. Clark 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Nancy C. Kashalena 
Bruce C. Pulsifer 



A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 
James D. Sullivan, M.D. 
Rev. Robert L. Wood 



16 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Jane Minesinger 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
Hanson C. Robbins 
Carol Shaw, Resigned 
Sandra Fitch 
Francis D. Rossi 
Robert N. Zabe 
Sarsfield Brennan 
Daniel V. Fritzsche 
Alexander J. Smith, Jr. 



Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


June 


28, 


1979 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

JUNIOR HIGH ADULT ADVISORY BOARD 



Irene Barr 
Harold Barr 
Irene E. Bouvier 
Daniel J. Champagne 
Pauline D. Hayes 
Robert H. Luke, Jr. 
Donald R. Lupfer 



Paulette A. Lupfer 
George Peterson 
Brenda Peterson 
Thelma Powell 
Alice Samaras 
Mary Ann Silva 



RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Thomas E. Anastasi, Jr. 
Philip J. Burr 
Robert A. Kinsman 
Elizabeth L. Martin 



C. Richard McCullough 
William R. Reagan 
Carol P. Shaw 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Griffin, Resigned 

James E. Loer 

Richard J. Lyman 

Paul F. Valzania 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

William M. Heyer 

Jane P. McCarty 

Jane Minesinger, Resigned 

Paul H. Snyder, Resigned 

Thomas E. Anastasi, Jr. 

Ellen E. Gifford 

Robert G. Stokes 



Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


April 


1. 


1978 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1978 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1979 


Term 


expires 


April 


1, 


1979 



17 



DEPUTY MODERATOR 

Tidal B. Henry Term expires April 1977 

SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Robert S. Capers, Jr. Term expires April 1, 1977 

David R. Iverson Term expires April 1, 1978 

Maryellen M. Valzania Term expires April 1, 1978 

Philip J. Burr Term expires April 1, 1979 

Ralph A. Parmagiane Term expires April 1, 1979 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Robert P. Ceresi Term expires November 30, 1977 

Loren G. Eaton Term expires November 30, 1978 

Neal R. Olsen Term expires November 30, 1979 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Philip J. Burr James F. Tubridy 

Priscilla J. Mahoney Francis A. Woodlock 

William R. Reagan 

REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 

Frank J. Cusack Thomas J. Donovan Steven M. Rudnick 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz Virginia F. Kinter Clarissa C. Supko 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 

Walter Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 

Frederick A. Rogers, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

Ellis N. Allen, Lieutenant 

William B. Reynolds, Lieutenant 

Mario Pederzini, Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 

Marie M. Burke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Susan N. Thornton, Assistant Clerk 
18 



APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN, 

CHAIRMAN OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

and MODERATOR to 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



James A. Sproul 



Term expires July 197 7 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 



Charlotte R. Randolph, Assistant Treasurer 



Term expires March 1978 




Edna Newell Huebener 
Participant at 1901 and 1906 Anniversary Celebrations 

Photo by Daniel Hogan 
19 



!C\ 



w 



MICHAEL S. DUKAKIS 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 02133 



September 30 , 19 76 



To the Town of Medfield: 

I extend to all the citizens of Medfield my 
warmest congratulations on the occasion of their 
325th anniversary. 

You all have much to be proud of. Your founding 
fathers laid the very foundation of our country. Their 
fortitude and courage are written in the annals of 
history. How awed they would be to see their small 
rural community now grown into such a thriving, busy 
suburbia. 

I congratulate you for your many accomplishments. 
Your growth has been remarkable without sacrificing 
the feeling of a warm, friendly town in which to live 
peacefully and gracefully. 

Coming at the same time a^our nation's festive 
bicentennial, may this annive3?>^ary be most memorable 
and enjoyable. 




20 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1976 



21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The year 1976 marked a double celebration for the Town; the 325th anni- 
versary of Medfield's incorporation and the bicentennial of the United States. 
The citizens of Medfield by the hundreds worked long and hard to make this a 
truly memorable year and their efforts resulted in a series of commemorative 
events illustrative of Medfield's unique contributions and place in American 
history. Perhaps the most important achievements of the celebrations, however, 
were the sense of community and the sense of pride in our town which were in- 
stilled in the townspeople by the various activities. It is to be hoped that 
these reminders of our heritage will inspire us to strive to preserve and im- 
prove the Medfield all of us know and love so that in 2075, when Medfield's 
time capsule is opened, the Town's future residents will have a town of which 
they can be justly proud. As part of our efforts to do this, your Selectmen 
were active this year in many projects, a summary of which follows. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD 

Arthur Farrar announced early in the year that he would not seek re- 
election to the board. During his three years as a selectman and his three 
years as a member of the Board of Health, Art served the town selflessly in 
his o\^m quiet way, and since leaving the board, has continued to assist the 
town on numerous projects. William R. Reagan was elected to succeed Arthur 
Farrar, and at the new board's organizational meeting, R. Edward Beard was 
elected chairman, Harry A. Kelleher was elected clerk, and William R. Reagan 
was elected third member. As 1976 drew to a close, Harry A. Kelleher announc- 
ed that he would not be seeking re-election to the board. 

APPOINTMENTS AND RESIGNATIONS 



Among the new committees established this year was the Growth Policy 
Committee, which was charged by the state to guide future development of the 
town. The Selectmen also appointed a Central Business District Study Com- 
mittee, an Historic District Study Committee, a Management Study Committee, 
and a Youth Advisory Commission. By the year's end, significant progress had 
been made by several of these committees as can be seen from their various 
reports. 

Special elections were held to fill vacancies on elective boards. Those 
elected were Raymond D. Cynewski and Peter A. Gaines to the Housing Authority 
to fill vacancies created by the resignations of Bruce Oravec and Lawrence 
O'Dell. Richard E. Nickerson was elected to the Park and Recreation Com- 
mission to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Arthur McEvoy; and 
Ann B. Thompson and Deborah L. Storrs to the Trustees of Public Library to 
fill the vacancies created by the resignations of Barbara A. Houck and Thomas 
Anastasi. 

At Town Hall, Gwen Suereth retired from the Assessors' office after near- 
ly three decades of service to virtually all of the town departments and Kay 
Conners resigned as secretary to the Board of Health culminating thirteen 
years of service to a number of Town boards and departments. 



22 



TOWN BEAUTIFICATION 

A significant step forward in improving the appearance of the Central 
Business District was made with the completion of the town hall plaza. This 
brick plaza, with old fashioned lighting and attractive landscaping, marked 
the beginning of a new commitment by the town to the Central Business Dis- 
trict. For their assistance, the Development & Industrial Commission, the 
Medfield Garden Club, Superintendent William E. McCarthy, and the highway 
personnel. Tree Warden Ellis Allen, and the donors of landscape materials are 
to be commended. The success of this project has already prompted additional 
efforts of civic organizations and businessmen to improve parking and the 
appearance of the central business district. To coordinate these efforts, 
the Selectmen appointed a Central Business District Study Committee. In ad- 
dition, an Historic District Study Committee was established this year with 
the hope that some of the character and beauty that is Medfield can be pre- 
served for future generations of Medfield residents. 

CONSERVATION AND RECREATION 

Acquisition of most of the Noon Hill reservation was completed during 
the year, and preparations were made for the proposed acquisition of twelve 
acres along the Charles and Stop Rivers by the United States Army Corps of 
Engineers for flood control. The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development began detailed mapping of Medfield 's flood plains as part of the 
federal flood insurance program. The Selectmen and the Park and Recreation 
Commission constructed two soccer fields and made other improvements at 
Metacomet Park with funds provided through the Housing and Community Develop- 
ment Act of 1974. Discussion was held with the Park and Recreation Commission 
on the proposed recreational use of the fifty-six acre hospital site. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Ground was broken on November 1, 1976 for the new police station, which 
is scheduled for completion in the spring of 1977. This new police facility 
will give our police adequate space and equipment to operate an efficient 
department and will unite our public safety operations at one location. An 
award was made to Continental Fire Trucks, Inc. of Hopkinton for the purchase 
of a new 1,000 gallon pumper for the Fire Department. 

A police dog was donated to the Town, and after completion of necessary 
training, it was assigned to the Police Department and placed under the care 
of Officer Raymond Wheeler. An unmarked cruiser was put in service this year 
which greatly assisted the department in their patrol assignments. 

The major public safety concerns of the Town during 1976 were the status 
of the Norfolk-Medfield Prison Project and the concern that the Medfield State 
Hospital would be converted to a prison to meet the Commonwealth's need for 
housing additional prisoners. At the close of the year, after several meet- 
ings among town officials. Representative George Sprague and representatives 
of the Department of Mental Health and the Department of Corrections, neither 
question had been resolved, but the Selectmen were committed to assuring that 
no action was taken by the state that would endanger the townspeople of Med- 
field. 

Fifteen persons were certified as emergency medical technicians, which 
qualified them to attend accident victims and man the town ambulance. This, 
and the purchase of a "Jaws of Lif e"^ as part of the new pumper will greatly 
improve the town's ability to assist accident victims. 



23 



WATER AND SEWER 

Well No. 4 off Elm Street was completed and put into service as was a 
new 12" main in Rocky Lane. In addition, the town meeting appropriated funds 
for the first phase of an update to the master plan for water. A sewer ex- 
tension to the Longmeadow area was constructed and design work on additional 
sewer extensions was begun after town meeting approval of a 5.5 million dollar 
bond authorization for sewer construction. The Town expects to receive 90% 
state and federal funding for this project. 

HIGHWAY 

Traffic signals at the intersection of Dale and North Meadows Road 
(Route 2 7) were put into operation and the town meeting approved the instal- 
lation of signals at the intersection of West Street and North Meadows Road. 
With the completion of these projects, it is hoped that the number of traffic 
accidents on the new Route 27 can be greatly reduced. Engineering plans for 
the reconstruction of North Street between Main Street and Frairy Street were 
drawn up for a spring 1977 bid. The Highway Department assumed responsibility 
for maintenance of Park and Conservation land and one employee was added to 
the department for this purpose. 

SOCIAL SERVICES 

The Town Meeting approved partial funding of an "outreach worker" to pro- 
vide counseling services to troubled youths. This service is provided by a 
contract agreement with the Medfield Committee, Inc. The Youth Advisory Com- 
mission was appointed by the Selectmen to serve as an advocate for the youth 
of the town and to give them a mechanism for providing input into the commu- 
nity's decision-making processes. 

Utilizing income from the Moses Ellis Post Trust Fund, of which the 
Selectmen are trustees, a grant was made to Olga Harrington to enable her to 
continue her visitation program to the homes of the elderly. 

HOUSING 

Tilden Village a 60 unit elderly housing complex^ was opened in November 
to the delight of both its new residents and the townspeople. The Medfield 
Housing Authority and all those who have worked so hard for so many years to 
bring this project to fruition are to be commended for their efforts. 

EDUCATION 

The town welcomed a new superintendent of schools, Robert Cresto and a 
new business manager, Russell A. Devereau during the year and the Selectmen 
wish them every success in their new positions. 

Applications for the new Tri-Valley Vocational School were accepted for 
a scheduled September 1977 opening. 

FINANCIAL 

Through the efforts of the Board of Selectmen, Warrant Committee, and 
department heads, the 1976 tax rate was held down to $61.70, a $0.20 increase. 
The continued financial problems of Massachusetts, however, are of concern as 
the Commonwealth tries to raid local revenues to meet its own obligations. 



24 




i 





PRESENTATION OF TIME CAPSULE 

Executive Secretary Michael J. Sullivan, William Reynolds of Reynolds 
Aluminum, Governor Michael S. Dukakis, Representative George R. Sprague, 
Administrative Secretary Pauline M. Goucher and Selectman William R. Reagan 

Photo by Ann Thompson 




PRESENTATION TO SELECTMAN ARTHUR L. FARRAR 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



25 



The attempt to divert lottery receipts from the local aid fund to general 
revenues was stopped by a concerted citizens action group but cities and towns 
need safeguards to prevent further such attempts. Also, the propensity of the 
Commonwealth to mandate programs and costs upon cities and towns must be stop- 
ped if local tax rates are to be stabilized. 

The Board of Selectmen and its staff continually monitor the actions of 
the General Court of the Commonwealth, the Governor, the state agencies and 
the federal government for actions which will have financial impacts on our 
community. It is a never ending vigil necessary to prevent erosion of our 
home rule. Too frequently, state and federal government agencies present 
legislation and mandate programs which incur local financial responsibilities 
without the necessary funding. 

DEDICATCON OF TOWN REPORT 

The Selectmen voted unanimously to honor Miss Laura H. Smith by dedicat- 
ing the Annual Town Report to her. Her selfless dedication to the town has 
enhanced our community visually and historically as she continues to work for 
the betterment of the Town of Medfield. The dedication of the Annual Town 
Report is a "first" and seems particularly appropriate this year. 

TIME CAPSULE 

The Selectmen were pleased to accept a time capsule from Governor 
Michael S. Dukakis during the year. In an effort to assist the planners and 
implementors of the nation's Tricentennial, each state was presented with a 
time capsule made by Reynolds Metal Company to capture those events taking 
place or any other historical record appropriate to be preserved. Because 
the Commonwealth had already been given a time capsule, we were fortunate to 
receive the gift of the Reynolds capsule from the State. We are the oldest 
community in any state to have a Reynolds time capsule, the location of which 
will be recorded in Washington, D. C. The capsule will be placed in the 
police station presently under construction. We hope its contents will pro- 
vide the residents of the future with insight into the great year Medfield 
experienced in 1976. 

CONCLUSION 

The report of the Growth Policy Committee was envisioned as a blueprint 
for orderly growth of the town. Fortunately Medfield had the foresight in 
1964 to prepare a master plan and to provide a mechanism for implementation. 
As a result the town has already made great strides in providing basic munic- 
ipal facilities and services. From roads and sewers to parks and conservation 
land, from zoning, subdivisions and sign by-laws to schools, police and fire 
stations, from water wells to the town hall plaza the town has made consider- 
able progress already. 



26 



This has been made possible in great measure by a combination of hard 
working selfless citizens who volunteered their time and their talents and a 
dedicated group of employees who always seem to do more than is expected of 
them. Their efforts and the efforts of those who follow will assure that in 
2076 the greatest gift of the town's tricentennial observance will be the 
Medfield we know and love. 

Respectfully submitted. 



R. EdiA}(Vid BdOAd, CkcuAman 
HoAAy A. K^Ue^k^A, Cl^ik 
\}JWiiam R. Re^agan 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




PAST AND PRESENT SELECTMEN 



Front: Selectmen Reagan, Beard and Kelleher 
Back: Messrs. Conners, Kolsti, Frank, Burr, Buchanan, McCarthy 
Marcionette and Farrar 

Photo by Ann Thompson 
27 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In The Year One Thousand Nine Hundred And Seventy-Six 



RESOLUTIONS CONGRATULATING THE TC^^m OF MEDFIELD ON THE OCCASION 

OF ITS THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH 

ANNIVERSARY . 



Whereas , The Town of Medfield was incorporated as a town by the 
General Court in May of the year sixteen hundred and fifty-one; and 



Whereas , The people of the Town of Medfield, from early colonial 
times and throughout its long history, have contributed immeasurably to the 
development of our Commonwealth and have exemplified the finest of its ideals 
and traditions; and 



Whereas , Many of its citizens have distinguished themselves in the 
field of public service to the tovm, the Commonv/ealth and the Nation, and have 
served and lost their lives in the defense of our country; and 



Whereas^, The celebration of the three hundred and twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the incorporation of the Town of Medfield is of historical 
significance not only to the inhabitants of the town but also to the 
Commonwealth; therefore be it 



Resolved , That the Massachusetts House of Representatives hereby 
extends to the Town of Medfield its heartiest congratulations and best wishes 
for a prosperous future on the occasion of the three hundred and twenty-fifth 
anniversary of its incorporation; and be it further 



Resolved , '^hat a copy of these resolutions be forwarded by the 
Clerk of the House of Representatives to the Town Clerk of the Town of Medfield 
to be filed with the official records of said town. 



House of Representatives, adopted, June 15, 1976, 
SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE 



CLERK OF THE HOUSE 



Offered by REPRESENTATIVE GEORGE R. SPRAGUE 



THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, 
WATER AND SEWER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is my pleasure to submit reports for the several departments under my 
jurisdiction for the Bicentennial Year and the Year of the 325th Celebration 
of the Town's incorporation. 

LANDFILL: The operation of the Landfill site has improved each year and 
at the present time fully complies with State regulations that pertain to 
Landfill sites; the credit for improvement is due to the interest and per- 
formance of Michael Gorman, the Operator. 

Gravel for daily cover represents a large item of cost for a Landfill 
operation. Gravel is now being supplied from Town owned property near the 
Smith Pumping Station off High Street; this operation saves the Town $20,000 
per year. 

A special committee was appointed by the Selectmen in early 1976 to study 
and make recommendations for a new site, since the present site will be ex- 
hausted in about another year. The members of the commitee have spent many 
hours of work to assure that the Town will have additional space for disposing 
of refuse by the time the existing site is finished; it has been a pleasure to 
work with such dedicated citizens. 

It is estimated that 20% to 30% of refuse consists of those items which 
are capable of recycling. Because new sites will be difficult to locate, 
residents are urged to participate fully in the program of recycling. 

PARKS AND CONSERVATION: Two years ago the Selectmen formed a committee 
of Town officials that maintained grounds for the purpose of determining the 
most efficient way of maintaining them. A mowing attachment for the Street 
Department's Ford tractor and a riding mower were purchased for mowing grass 
along streets and in the parks. One additonal man was included in the Street 
Department complement for Park maintenance and to perform limited work on the 

Noon Hill Conservation land. The results have been better Park maintenance 

and improved roadside maintenance. 

Last winter, personnel from the Street Department assisted the Conserva- 
tion Commission by cutting fire lanes and improving them by hauling gravel 
so that fire equipment will have access in the event of a woods fire. 

A great amount of work was done to change the gravel pit off Noon Hill 
Street so that it will blend in better with the surrounding land; a small 
amount of work remains and will be done this year. 

Excess pine and oak trees were cut last winter from Noon Hill and milled. 
A shed to house sanders when not in use was built with the lumber. The 
replica of a Toll House for a float in the Anniversary Parade was built from 
the lumber. The lumber was used for various types of signs and a substantial 
supply remains . 



29 



Conservation Board members have contributed much time to comply with the 
Tovm's wishes to preserve the area for conservation and passive recreation. 
It has been a pleasure for personnel to have assisted them. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT: In the year 1976, the three employees at the Treatment 
Plant passed their Grade 6 examinations. State and Federal officials have 
commended the Town for the operation of the Plant. In turn Town officials 
commend Thomas Costello, the Operator-in-Charge , for the operation of the 
Plant. 

Since there are very few Grade 6 Operators in the State, the demand for 
them is obvious. David Sloan became the Operator-in-Charge of the plant in 
Maynard and Brian Kelleher left to teach at Lowell University. 

We were sorry to lose them. These men were greatly appreciated for 
assisting in the startup and initial operation of the facility. 

A program for maintaining street sewers was instituted in 1975 and was 
continued in 1976. It consists of clearing sewers to reduce the chance of 
backing up; the program will continue. 

David Sloan's contribution to the 325th Anniversary Parade is acknow- 
ledged. He researched the original acts of the Legislature that established 
the Hartford Turnpike and he also researched the type of toll houses for that 
period of time. The result was an attractive float for the Parade of June 
1976. It may be of interest to know that the flag on the float contained 15 
stars and 15 stripes. 

WATER DEPARTMENT: In 1976 Well #1 was refurbished by Layne New England 
Company. The work consisted of repairing the pump and redevelopment of the 
well. 

Well #4 was put into operation in September of the past year and has a 
capacity of 700 gallons per minute. 

Regular maintenance of hydrants continues so that they will be operation- 
al in the event of a fire. 

A valve turning program continues so that water can be shut off in the 
event of a break in a main. 

The Department has spent considerable time marking out locations of 
mains in conjunction with proposed street sewer plans. 

Personnel assisted where required in the various Bicentennial events. 

Underground water systems were installed in Meeting House Pond Park and 
the two new fields at Metacomet Park. 

In addition to general help in the construction of the Town Hall Plaza, 
Charles Evans, Foreman, James Gorman, Thomas LaPlante and Paul Vezina moved 
the granite fountain and horse trough from the edge of Main Street 20 feet 
northwesterly to a new location. The fountain had been originally purchased 
in 1912 and was located at North and Main Street. In 1926 it was moved to 
Main Street in front of the Town Hall. The crack in the granite was repaired 
by Bruce Simpson and the fountain made operational. 



30 



STREET DEPARTMENT: Preparation for the Bicentennial started in 1975 
when regular help and CETA (Federally financed) help improved the roadsides, 
painted guard fences, prepared the parade route and, in general, cleaned the 
Town. 

Special signs were erected at the entrances to the Town on the route 
roads of the Town. 

The Historic Cotninission researched the original names of the principal 
brooks and the Town voted to designate them as recommended. Signs with the 
names of the brooks were placed where they crossed the streets. It was a 
pleasure to work with Miss Laura Smith on this project. 

The Street Department, under the direction of Robert Kennedy, Foreman, 
assisted the chairman and members of the various committees that presented 
the many festive activities of the year. As the townspeople enjoyed the 
various events, Street Department personnel enjoyed their participation. 
Members of the Street Department are Robert Kennedy, George DeVenanzi, 
Christian Zahner, Jr., Charles Grover, Gary Fraser, Edward Hinkley, Phillip 
Pember, Paul Doherty, Jr. , Dana Friend and John Morgan. 

DRAINAGE: Several small drainage problems were corrected which will 
result in easier maintenance of the streets involved and improved safety for 
motorists. An extremely bad flooding condition on Pleasant Street in the 
area of Metacomet Park was solved in conjunction with the work done on the 
Park. 

A dangerous ponding problem on North Street, northerly of Farm Street, 
was eliminated by additional drainage. 

Orchard Street is incapable of ordinary maintenance during the winter 
months due to water and snow melt freezing up to a foot in thickness. In 
1976 two catch basins were installed and connected to the drainage in the 
Indian Hill subdivision. 

Drainage problems exist in all sectors of the Town and despite the fact 
that it is a multimillion dollar problem, funds are not appropriated to 
correct the widespread defects in public ways. Town forces with Town equip- 
ment are capable of solving problems but funds for pipes and structures are 
not available. 

SURFACING: In order to provide the minimum of maintenance for 23 miles 
of older but important streets in the Town the application of 20,000 gallons 
of road oil each year is essential. Since the State eliminated the Chapter 
81 maintenance program the following is the gallonage applied each year: 
1973 - none, 1974 - 6,000 gallons, 1975 - 5,230 gallons, 1976 - 5800 gallons; 
Total 17,000 gallons. 

It is obvious that the Town will face major problems and major expense 
if funds are not appropriated for the maintenance of streets that carry large 
volumes of traffic daily. Costs for road materials have doubled in the last 
four years. 

By the time critical patching has been completed there are not suffi- 
cient funds left for a maintenance program. 



31 



OPERATION OF EQUIPMENT: Because of the sharp increase in the costs of 
parts over the past five years, operation of equipment has become a major 
budgetary item and it is planned to so treat it in the coming fiscal year 
by assigning it as a separate appropriation. The items that comprise the 
budget will be set up in the computer so that better management will be 
assured. 

The Bicentennial Year was an unusually busy one but the cooperation of 
everyone made it possible to complete the year successfully. Special 
appreciation is expressed to Nancy Franke, Gertrude Simpson and Pauline 
Goucher for their assistance. 

It has been a pleasure to work with Mr. Michael Sullivan, Executive 
Secretary, the Board of Selectmen and the many dedicated officials who serve 
the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WilZlam E. MaCanXky, Superintendent 
Streets, Water and Sewer 




Photo by Daniel Hogan 



32 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my sixth annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

As our town grows, our calls for service have again increased. Also, 
the increased building of houses, the new shopping center on North Meadows 
Road, and the new housing at Tilden's Village which were added to our alarm 
system, have increased the duties of the fire chief and the department. 

Fire drills have been held in all schools and the nursing homes in 
accordance with the law. All businesses were inspected and sprinkler tests 
were made throughout the year in accordance with regulations and in the 
company of the various fire insurance companies. 

The members of the department received forty hours of training in 
compliance with the "First Responder's First Aid Law". Emergency medical 
technician members also completed a refresher course so that they would not 
lose their certification. 

I would like to remind those residents who have the 359 exchange to 
call 911 for any emergency and those who have the 668 exchange to call 
359-4411. This will facilitate the dispatching of the proper equipment to 
meet an emergency. Also, I would like to point out that there are five 
hundred and twenty-five hydrants in the town and with the present limited 
personnel, it is impossible to clean out all of the hydrants at the time 
of a severe storm. If you have a hydrant near your home, you would be doing 
yourself and your town a great service if you would make an effort to clear 
around the hydrant. Residents are asked to see that their houses are 
numbered and can be seen clearly from the street. 

During the year, William Kingsbury and Charles Seavey have successfully 
completed the 81 hour Emergency Medical Technician program. 

It is with regret that we note the retirement of Joseph A. Roberts from 
the Fire Department. He has served the Department in a dedicated manner for 
forty years, which is a memorable record. David Sloan resigned in November 
to take a position with the Town of Maynard. We wish him well in his new 
home and position. Thomas Seeley was appointed to replace him in order to 
bring the complement of men up to twenty-five. 

I would like to express my thanks to the officers and men of the depart- 
ment for their outstanding service in the protection of life and property in 
the Town and also express my appreciation to the police officers, town 
secretaries. Building, Gas and Electrical inspectors, and all of the depart- 
ment heads for their cooperation throughout the year. 

I would like to make particular note of the services of Frederick C. 
Rogers, Jr. He is a dedicated volunteer who spends many hours each week 



33 



assisting the department by performing clerical duties and serving as a di; 

patcher during emergencies. We all owe Freddie a debt of gratitude. 

Respectfully, 

Jo6Z.pk E. Ryan, Fire Chief 

Services rendered for the year ending December 31, 1976 

Buildings 23 

Grass & Brush 120 

Automobiles 27 

Rubbish 7 

Gasoline Washdowns 7 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 4 

Outdoor Burning Permits 151 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 5 

Highway Accidents 11 

Electrical 17 

Investigations 27 

Oil Storage Permits 60 

Inspections 74 

Propane Gas Permits 5 

Model Rocket Permits 17 

Oil or Gas Burners 6 

Mutual Aid 10 

Outside Assistance 8 

Accidental Alarms 19 

Lock Outs 2 

Water Problems 8 

Bomb Scares 1 

Pumping Cellars 4 

Box Alarms 181 

Still Alarms 189 

False Alarms 26 

Explosive Permits 

Station Duty 20 

Dump 1 

Blasting Permits 18 

Televisions 1 

Rescues 6 

Ovens 5 

Chimneys 2 

Details 16 

Black Powder Permits 

Searches 2 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 71 



34 




OLD FASHIONED MINSTREL SHOW 





35 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Police Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1976. 

Personnel 

For the first year in my tenure as Chief, we had no changes in personnel 
of regular full time police officers. We did have changes in the intermittent 
force. Joseph Flaherty, Jr., Russell Mulgrew, Edward Farioli, Jr., and 
Gregory Tanger resigned as permanent intermittent officers to go on duty as 
full time officers in their respective communities. We began 1975 with 10 
intermittent officers and now have 2 — Patrick Caulfield and David Sloan, 
who recently moved from Medfield. I am awaiting a list from Civil Service to 
recommend appointment of several intermittents to fill in when regular 
officers are unavailable. For the past several months we have used Robert E. 
Meaney, Jr., George W. Hinkley, Robert D. Taylor, and Robert G. V. Taylor 
provisionally to fill in until more permanent intermittent officers are 

We used three pair of Interns from Northeastern University: January 
through March — Daniel Hutchinson and Michael Cellucci; April through June — 
Robert Clodi, and Robert E. Meaney- Jr.; July through December — Daniel 
Hutchinson and Michael Cellucci. 

During the summer months we added a man to the evening shift on week-ends 
to more properly cover the town in particular areas. We should add a man to 
both day and evening shifts, and, I have requested four men be appointed in 
1977 to accomplish this. I recommend a promotional examination be requested 
for Sergeant, to appoint two additional Sergeants to supervise each shift. We 
now have eleven shifts per week with no Sergeant. With additional manpower, 
we will be able to have greater flexibility and be able to place a man walking 
in the center of town and have a third cruiser on patrol evenings. We still 
have one man patrol cars and a great many times each day two cars have to 
answer the same call leaving the remainder of the town uncovered. 

Training 

In January, Officers Ronald Kerr and Kevin Robinson completed the twelve- 
week basic police course they began in October 1975. In early January, 1977, 
Robert Naughton and Anthony Bertone will attend Quincy Police Academy. 

Several officers attended various courses throughout the year for more 
expertise within our department. In accordance with the statutes calling for 
a rape squad on each department, officers Garvey and Roy attended a week long 
course in the procedures to be followed after a rape is reported. We also are 
mandated to utilize women on the rape squad. For that reason Mrs. Whitney, 
Visiting Nurse, Mrs. Champagne, Public Health Nurse and Isabel Rabe , Medfield 
Outreach Counsellor attended courses on victim counseling. 



36 



Officer Brady attended a course on child abuse. 

Officers Naughton, Bertone, Clancy, Robinson and Wheeler were instructed 
in use of the Identikit. 

Equipment 

We have had good success with our portable radios, but as they increase 
in age, so the repair frequency increases. We should also have more available. 

1 am requesting two new portable radios this year. I will be requesting re- 
placement radios for cruisers in the following years . 

The free cruiser we received from the Governor's Highway Safety Committee 
in August of 1975 has been very useful. We were able to patrol the main roads 
on occasion with extra personnel and it was used by Auxilliary Police to patrol 
school areas weekends. It also was used to replace a cruiser when one was 
broken down. 

In June, our third cruiser was re-painted by members of the Highway 
Department and is used as an unmarked car for investigations and surveillance. 
This was badly needed and has proven to be very useful. I am requesting funds 
to replace this car in 1977-78. It will be over 4 years old. Hopefully we 
may be able to keep the 1973 Ford as a spare car for court, etc. We will be 
able to trade our Highway Safety car in 1978. 

General 

Each year my report always indicates our biggest problems are manpower 
shortage, lack of space in the Police Station, and the nuisance complaints re- 
ceived, mostly in the evenings. In November 1976 construction began for our 
new Police Station next to the Fire Station on North Street. We are pleased 
to observe that completion is expected in May 1977 and we will occupy the new 
station soon thereafter. We extend our appreciation to the townspeople. 

I am hopeful that more officers will be added in 1977 which will alleviate 
the manpower shortage we now have. With the added patrols, we can answer and 
hopefully curb some of the nuisance complaints. 

We had 29 more breaking and entering cases reported in 1976 than in 1975 
but primarily due to hard work by Officer Garvey, 39 of the breaks were solved 
and either restitution made through the District Attorney's Voluntary Diversion 
program, or the perpertrators were brought to court. As a result, homeowners 
received about $2,000.00 in restitution. 

Through investigation we were also able to recover $1,500.00 in damages 
caused by vandals for the School Department and others. This would not be 
possible without using one or more officers exclusively as investigators 
to gather facts from officers on patrol and spend adequate time to pursue 
leads and interrogations. 

Medfield's 325th Anniversary, 1976, was a huge success in conjunction with 
our Nation's Bi-Centennial. I worked many hours on several areas of the cele- 
brations. On June 5th, for the first time, our entire 14 man department and 

2 interns were on duty for parade detail. Fifteen Auxiliary Police Officers 



37 



and 60 officers from the area towns of Millis, Norfolk, Franklin, Dover, 
Bellingham, Holliston, Dedham, Westwood, and Walpole were on duty to handle 
traffic for the thousands of people watching our gigantic parade. The day 
was a huge success and without incident, as was the case with all the Bi- 
centennial events. The Medfield Auxiliary Police were extremely helpful dur- 
ing 1976. They worked a total of 400 man hours for Bi-Centennial events and 
have worked about 1200 man-hours, aiding the Police Department on evenings 
throughout the year. 

It will be very hard to replace a dedicated servant such as Selectman 
Harry Kelleher who has chosen not to seek re-election in March of 1977. In 
my 7 years as Chief of Police I have observed the many hours he has worked 
for the town. Thank you, Mr. Kelleher, for all the assistance you gave to me. 

I wish also to thank the other town departments and employees for their 
help and cooperation throughout the past year. The Executive Secretary and 
his Town Hall staff have been very helpful this year as they have in past 
years. I'm sure I will not find it as convenient when we are not in close 
proximity to Town Hall but will keep in constant communication with Town 
officials and employees. 

Statistics for the year 1976 are as follows : 

Accidents Reported 263 

Personal injuries 29 

Fatalities 3 

Ambulance Trips 287 

Arrests 61 

Assaults 13 

Arson 7 
Assistance to: 

Other Departments 348 

Motorists 315 

General 475 
Automobiles 

Reported Stolen 15 

Stolen Motor Vehicles Recovered 19 

Citations Issued 465 

Warnings 55 

Complaints 393 

Arrests 17 

Bomb Scares 3 

Breaking and Entering 100 

Attempted 23 

Burglar Alarms Answered 596 

Civil Matters & Family Problems 77 

Closed Homes Checked 535 

Court Attendance 231 

Disturbance 14 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 162 

Windows Found Unlocked or Open 32 

Emergency Calls 213 

Fires Responded to by Police 126 

Funerals Escorted 13 

Indecent Exposures 3 

Investigation of Miscellaneous Complaints 1734 

Investigations with Other Departments 6 



38 



Larceny 252 

Under $50.00 121 

Over $50.00 62 

Bicycles 51 

Motor Vehicles 15 

Shoplifting 3 

Attempted Larceny 23 

Lost Children Reported 18 

Lost Children Located by Police 3 

Malicious Injury to Property 244 

Missing Patients Reported by State Hospital 125 

Missing Patients Returned by Police 60 

Missing Persons Reported 27 

Missing Persons Located by Police 6 

Messages Delivered 61 
Permits Issued: 

Gunsmith 1 

Ammunition Dealer 2 

Firearms Identification Cards 98 

Pistol Permits 25 

Bicycles Registered 110 

Drunks Held in Protective Custody 52 

Stolen Bicycles Recovered 14 

Property Reported Lost 66 

Lost Property Turned into Police 163 

Prowlers 43 

Summons Served 234 

Suspicions: 

Motor Vehicles 256 

Persons 152 

Phone Calls 57 

False Alarms Investigated 21 

Stolen Property Recovered 37 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 9 

Respectfully submitted. 



Chief of Police 



39 





GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONIES 
Medfield Police Station November 1, 1976 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



40 



REPORT OF THE POLICE STATION 
STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Police Station Study Committee was appointed in the Fall of 
1975 to prepare preliminary plans for the construction of a new Police Station, 
The committee completed its initial investigation including site selection 
survey and preliminary plans and submitted a report to the 1976 Annual Town 
Meeting recommending construction of a new police facility adjacent to the 
Fire Station on North Street. 

The 1976 Annual Town Meeting authorized a $275,000. bond issue for this 
purpose. After the initial bid opening, it was determined that this amount 
would be insufficient to complete the project. An article was submitted to 
the October special town meeting, requesting an additional $35,000. appro- 
priation. These funds were approved and transferred from the revenue sharing 
fund. 

A contract for construction was awarded to the Travi Construction Company 
of Braintree, Massachusetts and construction commenced during the Fall of 1976 
under the supervision of the architectural firm of Rich, Lang and Cote of 
Newton, Massachusetts with Mr. Edward Cormier serving as project manager. 
Groundbreaking ceremonies were held November 1, 1976. By the end of the year, 
the foundation had been poured and structural steel was in place. Occupancy 
was scheduled for the Spring of 1977. 

The committee wishes to thank the residents of Medfield for their support 
of this project and hopes that this new police station will serve the needs of 
our police department and the town for many years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 



MoAUXJl W. Kuui>kYi2A, Chairman 

fjJ^LZtlam H. Ma./in, Chief of Police 

Tkom(U A. McGZyiivU 

Tkomcu v. SiA)e,Q,n2,y 

flichaeZ J. Suttlvan, Ex Officio 



41 



THE AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1976 the ambulance was used for 287 trips; 123 to Leonard Morse Hospi- 
tal in Natick, 51 to Norwood Hospital, 37 to Glover Memorial Hospital in 
Needham. Twenty times the ambulance was called for but not used. We also 
responded under the mutual aid program to Millis 7 times and Dover 3 times. 
We called for mutual aid from Millis 4 times. 

Mileage on the ambulance, a 1974 Dodge, is 11,025 as of December 31, 1976. 
No major repairs were required throughout the year. 

Our ambulance advisory committee met several times throughout the year 
and we looked at several blood pressure units for use while in transit in the 
ambulance, but decided not to purchase any due to their inaccuracy while being 
used in the moving ambulance. 

As of July 1, 1977, we will be mandated to use only trained EMT's to man 
the ambulance. We have 15 certified now and expect to have 3 to 5 more by 
July 1st. We still have a problem getting EMT's during the daytime and some 
evenings. We will be requesting electronic pagers to utilize in conjunction 
with the new dispatch center at the police station for summoning ambulance 
drivers. A special article has been submitted for the required equipment. 

On the towns behalf, I would like to thank the corps of volunteers who 
so ably operated the ambulance throughout the year. Without these dedicated 
persons, we would not have the fine ambulance service that we do. Thank you, 
also, to Fire Chief Joseph Ryan who keeps the ambulance in condition and par- 
ticipates in the advisory committee. Dr. Sullivan, Robert Meaney, Jr., and 
Michael Sullivan are also on the advisory committee and were very helpful 
throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WyUlAMm H. Mann 
Chief of Police 



42 



THE CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my first annual report of the Civil Defense Department. 

1976 has been a busy and unusual year for the Civil Defense Auxiliary 
Police due to the Bicentennial Celebration. The many activities, too numerous 
to mention were covered by auxiliary volunteers for a total of three hundred 
and sixty-eight hours. 

The auxiliary police also were requested to cover the town at night by 
cruiser to supplement the regular police force. This required two men per 
night, seven days a week, a total of fourteen men or eighty-four hours per 
week, on a non-pay or volunteer basis. 

The officers and members of the auxiliary police are to be commended for 
their devotion and voluntary help. 

I wish at this time to thank all who have given their time and effort to 
make the Bicentennial Celebration a memorable event. 

Respectfully, 



iiJa/uizn L. Robliuon 
Director 




Replica of Stockade at Re-enactment of Burning of Medfield 

Photo by Daniel Hogan 
43 



THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



Water Department 




1975 




1976 


1977 






Actual 




Actual 


Estimate 


Total Services 




2,430 




2,454 


2,474 


Added Customers 




45 




20 


30 


Thousand Gallons Pumped 




328,658 




329,804 


350,000 


Thousand Gallons Sold 




214,300 




232,460 


252,000 


Water Revenue Received 




$128,579. 




$110,569. 


$141,200. 


Expenses 




$ 98,118. 




$115,546. 


$110,569. 


Debt Services: 












Smith Station & Wells 




$ 31,575. 




$ 30,525. 


$ 30,000. 


Sewer Department: 




1975 




1976 


1977 






Actual 




Actual 


Estimate 


Total Units 




196 




361 


484 


Added Units 




165 




123 


150 


Sewer Use Charge 








$ 19,427. 


$ 25,000. 


Sewer Installation Charge 






2,500. 


3,750 


Septic Waste Disposal Fee 






1,640. 


1,640. 


Expenses 




$ 63,501. 




$ 90,303. 


$116,133. 


Debt: 












Sewer Project I (5.25%) 


$1 


.,655,000. 


$] 


.,570,000. 


$1,485,000. 


Sewer Project 11(3-5% ) 




60,000. 




30,000. 




Longmeadow Sewer Design 


(6%) 




46,000. 


30,000. 


Longmeadow Sewer 












Construction (6%) 


$1 




$1 


325,000. 


300,000. 


Total Debt at year end 


.,715,000. 


.,971,000. 


$1,815,000. 


Principal Payment 


$ 


115,000. 


$ 


115,000. 


$ 156,000. 


Interest Payment 




94,500. 




94,600. 


103,535. 




$~ 


209,500. 


$ 


209,600. 


$ 259,535. 


Total Annual Cost 


$ 


273,001. 


$ 


299,903. 


$ 375,668. 



Number four well and pumping station was completed and placed in oper- 
ation in September 1976. The one million gallon-per-day facility has been 
in continuous operation and is a great asset in meeting our water demands. 



44 



The Water Master Plan Update, authorized in the Special Town Meeting of 
October 18, 1976, was begun in November with the program continuing into the 
new year. The update consists of a ground water survey to find and evaluate 
all possible well sites for future water supply, and a comprehensive study of 
the water system to determine changes and additions necessary to meet the 
future needs of the Town. 

As a result of several weeks of hot weather in early June and the ensu- 
ing high demand on the water system, a limited water ban was put into effect 
on June 24, 1976. The ban against the use of water for lawn watering, 
swimming pool filling and car washing proved very effective. Consumption 
prior to the ban of 1.9 million gallons per day was reduced to 1.4 million 
gallons per day with the ban in effect. The water ban was lifted on 
August 10th. 

By vote at the Annual Town Meeting of 1976, funds were appropriated for 
construction of street sewers in the Longmeadow Road area. A total of 8850 
feet of street sewers were installed providing connections for 109 dwellings. 
Sewage flow from the area began on October 1, 1976. 

Several changes occurred in personnel at the Waste Water Treatment Plant 
with David Sloan moving to the Town of Maynard Treatment Plant as Operator- 
in-Charge. Kenneth Feeney and Peter lafolla joined the Department and are 
currently studying for their operator's license. Operator-in-Charge 
Tom Costello, through continuing education, was successful in passing the 
examination for a Class 6 license. The Town is very fortunate to have such 
qualified personnel as Tom and his assistants operating our plant. Through 
their efforts we not only have a well maintained plant with top quality 
effluent but also have been recognized by Federal and State officials as a 
model facility. 

The Board met several times with the Town of Millis Selectmen and Board 
of Public Works and began negotiations for a Millis connection to the 
Medfield Treatment Plant. Review of a proposed contract is underway and it 
is expected that an appropriate contract will be brought before a To\vti Meeting 
in 1977 for consideration. 

The Board has also been in discussions with the officials at the Medfield 
State Hospital regarding their connection to the Treatment Plant. It is 
anticipated that a satisfactory agreement will be reached shortly. 

A public hearing concerning proposed sewer interceptors along the Charles 
River, Sewell Brook and Horse Brook was held February 4, 1976. Numerous 
questions regarding environmental and historical aspects of the construction 
were raised and discussed. The Board indicated its desire to work closely 
with all groups to assure protection of our natural environment and areas of 
historical significance. 

In August the Board was asked by the Town of Medway Selectmen to allow 
Medway septage to be deposited at the Medfield Plant. This request was a 
result of a critical situation in Medway regarding septage until the Franklin- 
Medway Treatment Facility is completed. The Board voted to allow limited use 
of the Medfield capacity so long as all of Medfield 's needs could first be 
met. 

As a result of some confusion regarding the proposed sewering of the 
Pine Needle Park area, a public hearing was held on October 26, 197 6. Over 



45 



50 concerned residents attended the hearing. The main areas of discussion 
involved both the need to sewer at this time and the constraint of proceeding 
only upon guaranteed reimbursement by Federal and State agencies. The Board 
reassurred the attendees that it only intends to proceed with the project 
under the reimbursement guidelines presented and approved at Town Meeting. 

A great deal of citizen concern arose over the sewer use charge estab- 
lished by the Board in May 1976. The Board had several discussions with the 
Selectmen and held a public hearing on November 16, 1976. The Board sub- 
sequently voted to reduce the sewer use charge with the understanding that 
costs not recovered by use charges would obviously be picked up in the general 
tax levy. The Board intends to annually review the charge and modify the 
rates as required, with the ultimate objective of a more equitable coverage 
of operating cost by the user. User charge in 1976 paid less than one-fourth 
of the operating cost for the year. 

The Board wishes to thank all the Departmental personnel. Board 
secretary, Mrs. Simpson, Superintendent Bill McCarthy and Town Boards that 
assisted us throughout the year. We also welcome John Rose, Jr. , our new 
Associate Member, who has contributed to our deliberations. 

Respectfully submitted. 



B^ace 0. TobAJU^on, Ckalnman 

Jokn V. WMyiam, CleAk 

LoIjOLnd V. ^qv^AjOlqz 

Jokn A. Ro4e, Jn., , Ki>i>ocAjoutQ. MejnbeA 




CHENERY COMMEMORATIVE CORNER 



46 





f 



4 

■Ml 



I 




:,::^ 



.^'. 




RE-ENACTMENT OF BURNING OF MEDFIELD 
IN 1676 



47 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby submits its Annual Report for the year 
ending December 31, 1976. 

RESIDENTIAL GRO\%TH OF TOWN : 

The Planning Board, as authorized under Chapter Al of the General Laws, 
approved one Definitive Plan of 79 lots named Colonial Park off High Street. 
The Essex Road Subdivision off Bridge Street has been completed. The Board 
has reviewed two Preliminary Plans - one off West and Bridge Streets and one 
off Orchard Street. An open space plan off High Street has been under dis- 
cussion. 

The Board released 54 lots for building within subdivisions and signed 
23 plans that did not come under the Subdivision Control Law. This shows 
the highest release of lots for building since 1969 and indicates that 
Medfield is still growing at a comfortable pace. 

A table is included indicating subdivision lots approved for building and 
the number of lots remaining in each subdivision to be built. The table runs 
from 1956 to date: 

(SEE SEPARATE SHEET FOR TABLE) 

CONTINUED UPDATING OF THE MASTER PLAN : 

A "Commercial and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and Program for the Town 
of Medfield" has been completed by our planning consultant, Metcalf & Eddy. 
This report will be used to assist the Board in planning for the future growth 
of the commercial and industrial areas of the town. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES : 

Members of the Board have attended various meetings with other Town 
Boards, the Landfill Site Selection Committee, the Historic District Study 
Committee and the Park and Recreation Advisory Board, as well as having 
Planning Board liaisons with all major Town Boards. Mrs. Munsey chaired the 
Growth Policy Committee. Board members have also attended meetings of the 
MAPC, Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards and the Charles River 
Watershed Association. 

The Board worked with the Master Plan Implementation Committee and the 
businessmen in presenting a new Sign Code to the Town at the 1976 Annual Town 
Meeting. Section 7 - Sign Code - of the Medfield Zoning Bylaw was adopted and 
is another step in the improvement of the appearance of our town. The Board 
would like to express its appreciation to Jane Minesinger for her able 
assistance in working with the business community for the development and 
passage of the Sign Bylaw. 



48 



Whitman & Howard, an engineering consultant, again reviewed preliminary 
and definitive subdivision plans, inspected subdivision street construction 
for the purpose of estimating surety and performed other engineering services 
as required. 

The Planning Board recommended all or portions of Kaymark Drive, Lakewood 
Drive, Morse Lane, Ridge Road and Stonybrook Road for acceptance. 

During the year the Board reviewed sixteen Sign Application requests and 
parking plans for new commercial buildings and apartments. 

Two appointments were made to the MPIC; namely, Sarsfield Brennan and 
Alexander Smith, Jr. 

GENERAL : 

The Board acknowledges the cooperation and assistance of other Town 
Boards and departments over the year. 

All regular Planning Board meetings are open to the public; however, 
appointments must be made the Thursday before the Monday meeting. Requests 
for information may be obtained from the Planning Board Assistant, Mildred E. 
Willis, at 359-8505. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Ke^nneXk M. CkllcU, J/l. , chairman 
VonaJtd J. HacVoywitd, Vice Chairman 
C. UlchaAd McCuZtouigk, Secretary 
RoboAt J. Lcuikln 
SandAa G. Man^et/ 



w 


i\ ii 


* * 


m 


•*!•' 




m 


tteL 


m- 




f^ 



^ 




HOME TOWN EXPOSITION 
49 



o 
2 a) 



a^ <3- vO CTi 



00 \o 



vO 


CTn 


LO 


O vo 


ON 


iJ a^ 


-— 1 


r-H 



t^ 


CO 




c 


w 


T3 O 


4-1 


0) -H 


o 


> CO 


J 


O -H 




1-1 > 


t— 1 


CI- -H 


^ 


CL TD 


4-1 


< ^ 


o 


3 


c-i 


CO 



c 

O 

•H 

I m 

XI -H 
3 > 

cn -H 



T3 


tfl 


(U 


4-1 


u 


(U 


(X 


0) 


0) 


^1 


o 


u 


o 


LO 


< 





00 >H 





1— ( 


































cS 














t— ( 


1— 1 










4J 
0) 




QJ 

a 

CO 








<-{ 




CN 


■u 


CO 


'T3 


o 










■P 

(U 




4-1 




4J 




u 




>-i 




hJ 




■u 




4-1 • 




• 


QJ 


QJ 


CO 


•H 






4J 




QJ 




Cfl OJ 


CO 


(U 




0) 




4-1 








(U 




(U o 




O 


QJ 


4-1 


O 


4-1 






QJ 




U 




OJ <u 


<u 


OJ 


CO 


QJ 




C/0 


QJ 


-i«i 




0) 




OJ 2 


x) 


2 


>-i 


CO 


Pi 


a 






QJ 




4-1 


^ 


iJ J-l 




>-l 


(U 


>-i 






> 


CJ 




(-1 




>-l 


CO 




4-1 


■u 




3 


5 




^ 




CO 


o 


<7J 4-1 


CO 


4-1 


4-1 


■U 




QJ 


•H 


o 


CO 


4-1 


^ 


•U CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


>-i 


QJ 




U 






o 


4J 00 


4-1 


cn 


CO 


CO 


(U 


4-1 


>-i 


rH 


(U 


CO 


)-l 


CO (U 


pti 


QJ 




w 


-H 


4-t 


•H 




CO 




QJ ^ 


>.l 


en 


CO 




4J 




c 


•H 


Q 


4-1 


4-1 




CO 


>-l 




U 


X 




CO 


CO 


> 


CO 






00 >-i 


X 


W B 


u 


B 


CO 


o 


CO 


c 




C 


CO 


<u 


P-I 


x: o 


;5 


O 


4-1 


QJ 


X) 


C 


U 


B 


QJ 


Id 


■n CO 


-H 


M 




M 


w 


X 


kJ 


CO 


C 


•H 


4-t 


c 




M<3 


0) 


< 


3 


{JO 


CO 


o 


•H 


n 


d 


CO 


•H pL, 


rH 


^ rt 


x: 


CO 




CU 




u 


5 


rH 


CO 


•H 


f-{ 


•H 


•H 




O 


Id 


QJ 


o 


CO 


CO 


•H 


o 


>-l 


•H 


60fe 


GOfi^ 


p- z 


4J 


o 


|i^ 


w 


Dh 


CO 


W >^ 


> 


>•. 


CO 


•H 


I— 1 




P4 


f^ 


CU 


Pi 


pq rH 


s 


•H 


•H 




CO 




o 












•H 


>-l 


U 


u 




>-i 


u 


CO 










r-H 




Pi ^ 


OS 


"4-1 


c 


u-l 


.H 


u-l 


t— 1 


U-l 


u 


U-( 


c 


U-* U 


•H 


u 


u-l 


g 


CO 


(X U-J 


u 


U-l 


X 


U-l 'H 


u-l 


U-l 




14-1 


^ 


U-l 


OJ 


u-l 


o 


U-l 


CO 


u-< 


O 


U-l c 


CO 


c 


u-l 


X 


CO 


U-l 


QJ 


u-l 


QJ 


U-l X 


U-l 


13 O 


T3 


o 


.H 


o 


B 


o 


)-l 


o 


T3 


o 


I— 1 


o d 


ClH 


3 


o 


o 


o 


.H 


o 


> 


o 


CO 


o c 


o 


>-i 


>-( 




CU 




CO 




CO 




0) 




o 


o 




o 




^ 




QJ 




O 




CO 


3 




< 


< 




CQ 




U 




O 




U 




u 


o 




u 




u 




Q 




Q 




W 


O 





50 



o 


ON 


<r 


^ ON a^ 


^ 


m 


CN 


rH 


\D CN 


<t 



•P 














4J 










1—1 


4-1 


CN 


+J 


ro 


4-1 


o 




CO 


4-J 




(U 
(U 


. 


. 


. 










<u 














0) 












0) 




CU 




CU 


2 




OJ 


<U 


d 


!-i 


d 


O 


o 










(U 








4-1 




4-1 


CO CU 








4-1 




0) 




0) 




CU 




4-1 


4-1 


CU 


o 


4-1 


S 


2 


3 








CO 4-1 


^ 




4-J 




<u 




W 0) 


OJ 5-1 


CO 






0) 


o 


5-1 


d 


S-( 


d 


5-1 


CO 


(U 


CO 


s-l 


•H 


CO 








4-1 




4J 


Q) CU 


4-) 




0) 




(U 




W OJ 


4J 4J 


tu 


4-1 


en 


OJ 


2; 


4-1 


2 


4-1 


z 


4-1 


0) 


(U 


4-J 


4-1 


CO 




-^ 


^ 


^ 


CU 




(U 


4-1 CU 


w w 




QJ 




s-l 


Cfl 


O 5-1 


CO CO 


+J 


0) 


0) 


5-1 




CO 




CO 




CO 


4-1 


s-l 


CO 


CO 


d 


+J 


s-l 


5-1 


5-1 


(U 




CU 


CO 5-1 


0) 




U 




4-) 


QJ 


5-1 4-1 


4-1 


CO 


CU 


4J 


4-1 


CO 




CO 




CO 




CO 


4J 


w 




CU 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


5-1 




5-1 


4-1 4J 


4-1 60 




4J 




CO 


U 


U CO 


CO 0) 


4-1 


5-1 


CO 


CO 


<u 


bO 


QJ 


bO 


CU 


00 


4-1 


CO 




00 


4-1 


CJ 


P-^ 


CL, 


P-( 


4-1 




4J 


CO CO 


tfl c 


rH 


CO 






u 


<u 


W 4-1 


CO 


4-1 


4-1 




4-1 


c 


4-1 


C 


4-1 


c 


CO 




d 


d 


X 


CO 








CO 




CO 


w 


4J -H 


.H 






c 


<: 


^ C XI 


•H 


w 


CO 


CO 


X 


CO 


•H 


CO 


•H 


CO 


•H 


w 


jd 


(U 


•H 


w 


X: 


CU 


QJ 


(U 




0) 




r", 


CO ^3 


•H 


c 




0) 




CO 4-1 


!>^ C 






w 


4-1 


4-1 


Xl 


4-1 


^3 


4-J 


T3 




4J 


Xl 


TJ 




O 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CU 


d 


o 


X 4-1 


W 5-1 


K 


•H 


0) 


cu 


0) 


e hJ d 


U CO 


Xl 


e 




3 


CO 


5-1 


CO 


5-1 


CO 


5-1 


T-H 


d 


5-1 


5-1 


4J 


d 


13 


T3 


13 


d 


CO 


X 


O 3 


CO 




CO 


t)0 


5-1 


c 


.-H O 


s-l 5-1 


o 


rH 


T3 


O 


w 


CO 


w 


CO 


W 


CO 


rH 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CU 


QJ 


0) 


<D 


•H 


h-i 


CU 


CO O 


00 ffi 


05 


s 


T3 


o 


u 


W 5-1 CO 


QJ O 


o 


W 


O 


CO 




33 




ffi 




ffi 


•H 


CO 


o 


PH 


o 


p-l 


0) 


m 


(U 


PL, 




z 


O CO 


C 


!-l 




•H 




o 


CD 


XI 


[3 




O 




c 




c 




d 




ffi 








CO 




S 


s 


2 




o 




o 


•H m 


CU 


M-l 


M 


U-l 


^ 


<4-l CL U-( 


W U-i 


iH 


M-l 


^ 


M-l 


>.M-I 


>, M-l 


>, M-l 




M-l 


CU 


M-l 


X 


M-l 








M-l 


•H 


MH 


(U M-4 


TJ <+-! 


4-1 


"4-1 


^ 


•4-1 


4-J 


M-l T-i y-i 


50 M-i 


tH 


M-l 


CU 


M-l 


rH 


M-l 


.H 


M-l 


I— 1 


M-l 


d 


M-l 


M 


M-l 


o 


M-l 


CU 


CU 


QJ 


M-l 


U 


MH 


bO M-i 


S-i O 


4-1 


o 


> 


o 


5 


o c o 


d o 


O 


o 


^ 


O 


S-l 


o 


5-1 


o 


5-1 


o 


o 


O 


CO 


O 


d 


o 


d 


d 


d 


O 


CO 


O 


CO O 


Cfl 


Ct) 




CO 




CO 


3 


•H 


c 




CO 




s 




CO 




CO 




o 




CU 




(U 




•H 


•H 


•H 




3 




4J 


ac 


ffi 




Pd 




:i: 


^ 


^ 


^ 




hJ 






S 




S 




:z 




O. 




CU 




P-i 


PL, 


P-i 




C^ 




CO 



51 





01 




i-l Cfi 




O 03 




2 Q) 


en 


rH 


■u 


0) 


O 


cd 


J 




rH 


-o 


to 


(1) 


iJ 


w 


o 


d 


H 


(U 




rH 




OJ 




c^ 



LO O >X) 
ON J_) ON 



c 

X T3 O 

G > X 

J O -H 

rH CL -H 

4_. < XI 

O 3 






-a 


05 


a) 


■U 


4-) 


0) 


CL, 


OJ 


o; 


^c 


o 


4-1 


o 


C/0 


< 







(U 




4-J 


CJ 




QJ 


l-l 




OJ 


4-1 




U CO 


CO 




■U (U 






C CO >-i 


00 




(U o 


c 




-H X <: 


•H 




O CO 


U 




•H -T3 


a, 


CO 


0) 3C C 


en 


hJ 


W CO 




< 


•H U-l rH 


U-l 


H 


>-i '-M T3 


<4-l 




COO 


O 


H 


d o 






C/5 3 







52 



THE MASTER PLAN 
IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Medfield Master Plan Implementation Committee hereby submits its 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1976: 

The Commercial and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and Program was review- 
ed by the MPIC and met with their approval. This study will be used as the 
basis for enlarging the Central Business District. 

Early in 1976 the MPIC assisted the Planning Board by chairing a series 
of Slide Presentations which brought to the public's attention current signs 
in Medfield and how they could be improved in the future. A comprehensive 
Sign Bylaw was passed at the April 1976 Annual Town Meeting. Mr. Zabe has 
been appointed to the Sign Advisory Board which will help keep the Sign Bylaw 
current. 

Mrs. Minesinger, Mrs. Shaw, Messrs. Brennan, Smith and Zabe served on 
the Growth Policy Committee, whose task it was to answer the Growth Policy 
Questionnaire and develop a growth policy statement for the Town of Medfield. 
This was an interesting project and covered all facets of town government. 
Medfield 's statement has become part of the regional statement and will be- 
come part of the Commonwealth's statement. 

The Medfield Master Plan Implementation Committee would like to thank 
the businessmen for their cooperation in assisting with the Sign Bylaw 
passage. We would also like to thank all others who cooperated with us dur- 
ing the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sa/u{^lzZd BKznvian, CkouAman 

HoAgoJizt BancAo{)t 

Sand/ia VaJlcH. 

Vayiidi I/. VnJXzi^dko, 

HayaovL C. RobbZyid 

VnanCyU Roma. 

klQ,xand2A J. Smith, J^. 

RoboAt hi. labt 

MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



53 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Appeals on Zoning submits herewith its report for the year 
ending December 31, 1976. 

The Board was organized as follows: 

James T. Regan, Chairman 
Robert F. Sylvia, Clerk 
William F. Spang, Member 
James 0. Aronson, Associate 

During the year, the following applications were heard and decided: 

1 Variance for Lot Frontage to allow a driveway. Allowed 

1 Variance for Sign. Denied 

1 Variance from rear and side setback requirements. Denied 

1 Variance from side setback requirements. Denied 

1 Variance from rear yard setback requirements. Allowed 

2 Variances from lot frontage requirements. Denied 

1 Variance from lot frontage requirements. Allowed 

1 Variance to build residences on industrial land. 
Decision not yet rendered. 

1 Variance to build stores on residential land. 
Decision not yet rendered. 

1 Special Permit for Dentist's Office. Allowed 

1 Variance from lot frontage. Denied 

In each case, the decision of the Board of Appeals was unanimous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JamOyii T. Regan, Chairman 
BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



54 



GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Growth Policy Committee hereby submits its report for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

In compliance with the Massachusetts Growth Policy Development Act 
(Chapter 807 of the Acts of 1975) the Selectmen appointed a Growth Policy 
Committee for the Town of Medfield, as follows: 



Julie Alasso 
Eleanor Anes 
R. Edward Beard 
Sarsfield Brennan 
Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Jane Minesinger (Resigned) 
Sandra G. Munsey 



Bruce Oravec (Resigned) 
Mario Pederzini 
Carol Shaw 
Alexander Smith, Jr. 
Michael Taramero 
Richard Whelan 
Robert Zabe 



The purpose of this committee was to answer the Growth Policy Committee 
questionnaire for the Town of Medfield and formulate a growth policy state- 
ment. Sandra G. Munsey was elected Chairman; Jane Minesinger, Vice Chairman; 
and Norman A. Gray, Jr., Secretary. 

Hearings were held in the process of developing the statement and the 
townspeople were invited to attend and comment on the answers which were 
proposed. 

In briefly summarizing the Growth Policy Statement, it was the con- 
clusion of the committee that Medfield wants to keep its present status as 
a residential community with continued, orderly growth which will maintain 
the residential and historical character of the community; to continue to 
improve environmental quality and open space; to preserve home rule, local 
autonomy and initiative; to improve the central business district; and to 
maintain the quality of schools; to maintain a cross-section of residents; 
to provide more housing for the elderly; to encourage industrial growth of 
the type compatible with the residential character of the town; to improve 
the town appearance; to stabilize the tax base; to provide recreational 
opportunities through public and private resources; and to improve public 
transportation. It was the committee's conclusion that regional responsi- 
bility should be confined to those areas of mutual concern that obviously 
surpass the boundaries of one community. 

In December the Committee attended the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council (MAPC) southwest subregional hearing at which the Regional Growth 
Policy Statement was reviewed. At that meeting it was discovered that MAPC 
communities share many concerns, notably the effect of mandated state pro- 
grams on municipal taxation, the need to control growth rationally, the need 
to maintain and preserve existing neighborhoods and the need to provide or 
improve municipal services such as water, solid waste and sewerage disposal. 
Topics raised of particular interest to Growth Policy Committee members of 
the southwest subregion included traffic congestion on Route 109 from Milford 



55 



to Dedham; southwest corridor commuter rail development; bicycle paths for 
transportation and recreation; housing impact of anticipated continued popu- 
lation growth in this subregion; impact of federal program requirements on 
municipalities; encouragement of industrial development in the Interstate 495 
area. 

The committee is awaiting the State Growth Policy Hearings early in 1977 
which will undoubtedly be a basis of legislation. 

A copy of the Growth Policy Statement is available for examination at the 
Planning Board Office. 

The committee would like to thank all those who have assisted us in the 
formulation of this statement. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Sand/ia G. ^\uyiiiQ,y, Chairman 
GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 




AERIAL VIEWS 
June 5, 1976 



Photo by James Seeley 



56 



THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

In this Bicentennial year, a short review of the history of the library 
service in Medfield apropos Medfield's commitment to library facilities is 
an old one. Shortly after the Revolutionary War in 1786, a circulating 
library was opened to the public for a fee of one dollar a year for four 
years. The first library supported by the town was established in 1872 and 
was housed in the town hall. In 1918 the present building was donated to 
the town by Granville Dailey in memory of his wife and daughter. Historically 
it can be seen that the town felt its people needed a library where they could 
educate themselves on problems of the day and at the same time read about 
topics that interested them. Today the Library Trustees recognize that com- 
mitment and are working towards its fulfillment. 

The Trustees saw considerable action this year on library expansion. 
The Library Study Committee, an independently appointed group, met periodic- 
ally during the year to review the facilities of the present library. The 
Committee unanimously agreed that the 58 year old structure needed expansion 
if the needs of the town were to be met. After reviewing various methods of 
expansion, the Committee felt that updating the expansion plans of 1966 was 
the most feasible and economical plan of action. These plans would extend 
the present building back to the structure behind the library that is present- 
ly being used by the Historical Society. 

The 1966 plan needed considerable updating in light of changes in the 
state building codes. With this in mind, the Library Study Committee sub- 
mitted an article in the October Special Town Meeting requesting $2,500 for 
architectural fees to update the plans. This was needed in order to apply 
for funding under the Public Works Act passed by Congress which provided for 
100% funding. The application was submitted for an addition to the building 
which would cost $729,000. This contrasted with the $250,000 it would have 
cost in 1966 to build the same addition. The town recently received word 
that Medfield's application for funding was not approved. However, the pro- 
ject was high on the priority list and came within two towns of being accept- 
ed. With the cost data accumulated through this effort, the Library Board 
will investigate possibilities of refiling for future funding under the Public 
Works Act or the Library Services and Construction Act, which has not been 
funded in recent years but may be in the near future. The Board will pursue 
every possible alternative. If no state, federal or outside aid is forth- 
coming, the Trustees are pessimistic about achieving our expansion goals. 
The need, however, is pressing, and space is very limited. 

The Trustees had several changes in membership this year. Kenneth 
Fettig, after serving six years, declined to run. The Board will miss his 
expertise. Tom Anastasi was elected in his place, but after serving five 
months, resigned to serve on the Warrant Committee. Barbara Houck resigned 
in July due to a move out of state. To fill these vacancies, the Trustees 
and the Selectmen met and elected Ann Thompson and Deborah Storrs. 



57 



In the forthcoming year, the Trust'^e'^ hope to upgrade the position of 
Children's librarian by increasing the number of hours worked per week to 
twenty-five. This increase of five hours per week is needed because of ex- 
pansion of programs in the children's room. For the convenience of the public, 
the Trustees support the recommendation of the Head Librarian to open the 
library in the morning from 10 A.M. - 12 noon. 

The Trustees wish to thank the Warrant Committee, the Selectmen, and 
townspeople for their support over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jawe/6 F. BoAton, CkcuAman 

MoAy EZZe.n Vonahue,, UA^dd-CkouAmnn 

Vzbona.h StoHA^, SQ,cAQXaAy 

Jane, Guth/Ue, 

Vavld b^AlmanZk 

Ann Thompson 




Children's Story Hour at the Library 

Photo by Ann Thompson 
58 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Head Librarian for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

I am pleased to report that the size of the book collection has grown 
by over a third from what it was five years ago. However, it is still low 
in volumes per capita compared to other towns of our size. This condition, 
coupled with our lack of space in which to shelve needed materials, is a 
real problem to the town. 

To remedy this situation, the library applied for a grant of $729,257. 
under the 1976 Public Works Act for an addition to the building. The pro- 
ject was not approved, but it is expected that additional funding will be 
voted by Congress during 1977, and our application will be resubmitted at 
that time. 

The library did receive a federal grant of $4,180. for enrichment pur- 
poses which made possible the following purchases. Ten framed art repro- 
ductions of famous paintings were bought and may be borrowed to hang in the 
home or office for a period of six weeks. Educational toys and games were 
selected for use in the children's story hour and for circulation to play 
groups and nursery schools in town. The front reading room was carpeted 
which adds to the attractiveness of the room and reduces the noise level. 
The remaining portion of the grant was spent on a mimeograph machine, 
electric typewriter, desk and reference books. 

This was the year for grants inasmuch as the library was most fortunate 
to receive an additional grant from Corning Glass. The money was used to 
buy a film projector and screen which has allowed us to expand library pro- 
gramming. Films have been shown weekly to the children's story hour groups, 
and several adult film programs have been scheduled for showing in the 
evening . 

The Friends of the Library, chaired by Betty Temple, held a successful 
used book sale in October which netted over $300 in sales Beautiful wood 
grain formica table tops were purchased to cover the badl; scratched tables 
in the reading room. Enough money remained to resurface t le charge out 
desk also. 

During the year, we were notified by the Museum of Science and the 
Children's Museum that institutional passes would no longer be available. 
We regretted not being able to offer these passes, but 'n their place the 
library purchased free admission passes to the Larz Anderson Museum of 
Transportation and the Franklin Park Children's Zoo. We continued to offer 
the popular Museum of Fine Art's pass. 

Exhibits held at the library during the year included paintings by 
local artists, Helen Hickey and Rita Bernier, needlepoint designs by 
Barbara Allan, a display by the high school Astronomy Club and the wedding 



59 



dress worn at the Bicentennial wedding which was sewn by Pat McGuire. 

In the children's room, the Bicentennial theme was used in the summer 
program when a different colonial project was undertaken each week. Led by 
local volunteers, the children made such things as pomander balls, corn husk 
dolls, silhouettes and bread. A summer morning film and story program was 
enjoyed by four through seven year olds, and on an experimental basis the 
children's room was opened during evening hours in the summer. 

In an effort to encourage school children to use the public library dur- 
ing the summer, a number of classes visited the children's room prior to 
summer vacation when a special program was held. 

The purchase of the educational toys enabled the fall Story Hour to ex- 
pand to include puppet plays, flannel board activities, and rhythm band 
instruments. Special activities in the children's room inpluded continuation 
of the drama group, the making of a mural to decorate the walls, constructing 
bird feeders, the beginning of a toy exchange for outgrown playthings, and the 
opportunity to acquire a free gerbil when our resident gerbils became parents. 

Looking forward to the future, we have included money in next year's 
budget for opening the library from 10:00 A.M. to 12 noon on weekdays. We 
have had numerous requests to expand our hours to include the morning and are 
hopeful that the Warrant Committee will recommend and the town will approve 
the necessary funds. 



STATISTICS 



CIRCULATION FIGURES 



Adult Department 47,023 

Children's Room 20,824 

Interlibrary Loan 586 

Paintings 50 

Museum Passes 190 

Total Circulation 68,673 

New Books Purchased 1,128 

Volumes Presently Owned 21,192 

It has been a pleasure working with the Library Bo.?rd of Trustees in a 
cooperative effort to bring better library service to tne people of Medfield, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jam B. KKckdn, 
Head Librarian 

STAFF 

Jane B. Archer, Head Librarian 
Barbara Friend, Assistant Librarian 
Connie Jones, Children's Librarian 

Constance Yena, Senior Aide 

REGULAR AIDES 

Ruth Justice Lillian Kalweit Marie Luna 

Marilyn Erickson Debra Regan Virginia Cusack 



60 




61 



THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

The close of this ver}' special year in our town and our Nation causes 
the Housing Authority to express appreciation to its fellow citizens for the 
cooperative spirit that continues to exist between committees, boards and all 
town officials. It was this spirit at work that made 1976 a year of cele- 
bration that will long be remembered. 

There was however, cause this year for regret also, as the Housing 
Authority saw two of its valuable members resign in order to move to other 
communities. Mr. Lawrence O'Dell^who served ably as treasurer, moved to 
Fishkill, New York. Mr. Bruce Oravec, who was chairman for the three and one- 
half years he served on the authority, accepted a position in Worcester, 
Massachusetts. Without his legal expertise the Authority's position in the 
dispute with the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency over tenant selection 
could not possibly have been as well represented. Mr. Raymond Cynewski and 
Mr. Peter A. Gaines were elected to fill these unexpired terms in special 
elections held jointly with the Board of Selectmen. 

On March 1st in a meeting with officials of the Massachusetts Housing 
Finance Agency, the Authority was commended for the fairness with which it 
had allocated the apartments at Wilkins Glen. Further the Authority was in- 
formed that the Agency was totally satisfied that Fair Housing Practices had 
been observed. 

With this time-consuming dispute successfully resolved, the Authority 
was free to devote the majority of its time to the construction on Pound 
Street of 60 units of housing for the elderly. The architects, Robert Charles 
Associates and the General Contractors, Paul Sardella Construction Company, 
worked harmoniously to bring the project to completion. It was a very happy 
day for the Medfield Housing Authority members, past and present, for the 
prospective residents and the entire town when on November 15, 1976, the 
first apartments were occupied. It seemed especially fitting that this event 
should take place during the Bi-centennial year. The remainder of the units 
were made available also before December 12th, thereby assuring safe, at- 
tractive housing for many of our senior citizens. 

The Housing Authority requested the Historical Commission to supply it 
with possible names for the project on Pound Street. The Commissions assist- 
ance was very much appreciated. The name "Tilden Village" was chosen by the 
Authority to honor William S. Tilden, Medfield' s much-quoted historian of the 
19th Century. The Commission suggested also that each of the six apartment 
buildings or houses bear the name of an early land-owner. Through their re- 
search names of leading citizens of the 16th and 17th Century were chosen. 

In November, the Authority appointed its secretary Marie Roberts to serve 
also as Executive Director of Tilden Village. Mrs. Roberts has her office 
in the Community House and is available there not only to the residents, but 
to the entire community as well. Anyone who wishes to have information re- 
garding housing, should call the office between 9 and 12 Mondays through 
Thursdays. 

62 



The residents have also been well served by Mr. John 0' Toole, who, as 
maintenance supervisor of Tilden Village has solved every imaginable sort of 
problem and a few that were beyond imagining. The Authority considers itself 
fortunate to have two such caring people as Marie and Jack to serve in these 
critical positions. 

Many individuals and organizations already have given of themselves most 
generously to make the residents of Tilden Village even more comfortable and 
at ease in their new homes. The Authority appreciates each and every kind- 
ness and is also grateful for the fine spirit of cooperation it has received 
from the Board of Selectmen and the other town boards and departments. It is 
especially thankful for the assistance of Mr. William McCarthy and all the 
men of the Highway Department who have assisted in every phase of the 
Authority's work. 

For several years, the Housing Authority occupied office space in the 
Town Hall. During that time it was the recipient of much assistance from 
the town's Executive Secretary, Mr. Sullivan and his predecessor Mr. Conley 
as well as Mrs. Goucher and the entire Town Hall staff. This helpful atti- 
tude has made the work of the Authority and its employees for more pleasant 
and at times has made the difference between success and failure. 

At every step down the long path of development of both Wilkins Glen and 
Tilden Village, the Authority has found it's Representative to the Great and 
General Court of the Commonwealth, Mr. George Sprague to be a strong support- 
er whenever needed. Since his district has included Medfield, he has been an 
avid advocate of the Housing Authority, and he has chosen to make its problems 
his own problems. The Housing Authority thanks him on behalf of all the 
residents. 

In the years ahead, plans to meet further housing needs of Medfield' s 
citizens will have to be made by the Authority. It is therefore vital that 
persons who are having difficulty finding safe, adequate housing which they 
can afford within the community, give this information to the Housing Author- 
ity. Programs can be developed only to meet proven needs, and these needs 
can be demonstrated only if they are reported to the Authority. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HazoZ R. hiank, Ckcujiman 

Dorothy V. An(Utcu>A., I'^ce ChcuAman 

?eX2A A. Gainer, T/ieoiuAe/L 

Raymond V. Cynew^kl, k^^Lbtawt T^^j(Uua^a 

liidkcidi W. TammoAo, S^cAoXoAy 

MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



63 




B ^ ^ ^- -^ '- 



Float in Bicentennial Parade 



Photo by Toby Reed 



64 



THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The preservation and protection of Medfield's Wetlands which constitute 
a very large acreage of the Town, has kept the Conservation Commission busy 
during the past year with monthly meetings, a few hearings and numerous in- 
vestigations concerning Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Wetlands Protection 
Act. 

We have met many times with other boards in trying to resolve certain 
important issues that have arisen. Also, the Commission is very grateful to 
the concerned taxpayer or citizen who brings to our attention violations re- 
garding the wetlands. Without this cooperation, it would be impossible for 
us to know where and when these violations are taking place. 

A general clean-up job was well done by the Boy Scouts on Town-owned 
land along Noon Hill Street which meant picking up fallen trees, piling brush, 
etc. The Scouts also made and erected wood duck boxes. 

With the help and cooperation of the Highway Department and Robert Bryant, 
our land resources manager, some select cutting of trees was done that made it 
possible for the Town to acquire several hundred feet of usable lumber at a 
very small cost. This lumber was used to make the small buildings used in 
the Bicentennial Parade as well as all the road barriers used on that memor- 
able day. This type of select cutting helps the forest and encourages better 
growth . 

Gates were installed in the Noon Hill area to prevent four wheel drive 
vehicles from using the roads that had been built and repaired the year before, 

It is the hope of the Conservation Commission that with strict enforce- 
ment of State Laws concerning wetlands, and with careful planning and co- 
operation with other boards, many problems that have arisen from violations 
can be avoided in the future. Our vast Wetlands are an irreplaceable asset. 

Our sincere thanks to the Board of Selectmen, Department Chairmen and 
Superintendents plus all the staff at the Town Hall who have been so co- 
operative in helping carry out our designated tasks for the benefit of the 
taxpayer and the citizens of the Town of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Rob<Wt fCin^mcLYi, Chairman 

^a/vio ?Q,d<VizlYil, Vice-chairman 

Hanson C. Robb^n^ 

RobeAt W. HacL2.od 

Enwln SoJ^doX 

iUUIlam V. (JJaLi>k 

VKQ^doAyick V. Ha/ovUon 

ktddYi VembdA, Associate Member 

Toby Reed, Associate Member 

Conservation Commission 



65 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

Board of Health activities during the calendar year 1976 included the 
following: 

ESTABLISHMENTS 
FOOD SERVICE AND RETAIL FOOD STORES 

All food service establishments and retail stores were inspected at least 
twice, and most were checked four times as is our current policy. A few in- 
stances of improperly operating equipment and substandard facilities were 
found and corrected to comply with our rules and regulations. Also, in view 
of the problems some surrounding towns had with mobile food service vendors, 
we initiated the licensing and inspection of these units. 

As proposed in last year's report a Food Handler's Sanitation Training 
Course was held last spring with most of the food service establishments in 
town in attendance. 

Our Registered Sanitarian, Mr. John J. Keefe, made 191 inspections during 
1976. Most of these inspections were at food service establishments and re- 
tail food stores. 

SEWAGE AND WATER SUPPLY 

Mr. William R. Domey , Registered Professional Engineer, acting as our 
agent in matters concerning on-site sewage and water supply has been most 
valuable in coping with a number of borderline lots, failed systems, and in 
the development of a new set of rules and regulations for well water supply 
and sewage. These new regulations became effective January 19, 1976. 

The Board of Health, acting in cooperation with the Water and Sewerage 
Board, continues to monitor the abandonment of on-site sewage systems and the 
disposal of septic effluent and transportation. 

GARBAGE COLLECTION 

The garbage contract was renewed with Francis J. Cassidy of Medway. 
Collections continue to be made once a week during the winter seasons and 
twice a week during the summer. 

HINKLEY MEMORIAL POND 

The Hinkley Swim Pond was inspected weekly during the summer of 1976. 
The bacteria count remained low throughout the season. The visibility was not 
acceptable in the first week of the swim season. The pond was closed for 
several days until the consultant hired by the Park and Recreation Commission 
was able to rectify the problem. The pond was then reopened for the season 
and exhibited its best water quality for swimming in some time. 



66 




Kay Conners Receives Certificate of Appreciation 

Photo by Sally Adams 



67 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

In order to cope with the increasing number of animal control complaints, 
the Board of Health drafted a new set of animal control rules and regulations 
which became effective in January 1976. Residents were reminded that the 
keeping of horses, livestock and certain other animals and fowl, except by 
permit of the Board of Health, is prohibited. 

All horses must be immunized against Encephalitis annually, and dogs 
must be immunized against rabies by the age of six months and revaccinated at 
intervals not exceeding twenty-four months, as a condition to being licensed. 
Rabies Clinics, formerly held by the Board of Health, last year were conducted 
by the Medfield Humane Society, as well as a clinic for the detection of Heart 
worms. 

Our Animal Inspector, Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M. reminds all residents that 
all animal bites or scratches must be reported immediately to him, or the 
Board of Health, in order that he may quarantine the animal, and if necessary 
arrange for a laboratory examination. Animals biting other animals should 
also be reported. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE 

The Visiting Nurse Association of Dover, Medfield, Norfolk, Inc. has 
again been certified by the Social Security Administration, as a participating 
home health agency in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, having met all the 

requirements. 

Educational seminars and in-service education programs attended by staff 
this year, include 2 on mental health, 1 on cardiac rehabilitation, 1 on 
speech therapy, 1 on cardio-pulmonary resusitation, 3 on neonatology, 1 on 
cancer, 1 on Rape-Victim and Offender, 1 on spinal cord injury patient care, 
and 1 on public health nurses responsibilities in T.B. reporting and follow-up. 

Total meetings attended were 17. Four Peabody School L.P.N, students 
spent one day with our nurse for their visiting nurse experience. We also 
prepared statistics for various state agencies. Orientation, instruction, 
and evaluation of home health aides was carried on. Communicable disease 
follow-up includes T.B., Salmonella and Hepatitis. Another area covered by 
the visiting nurse are the newborn visits. 

Medfield Statistics for 1976 

Types of Visits Cases Visits 

Nursing 111 1,047 

Physical Therapy 7 25 

Home Health Aids 7 472 

Sickroom supplies and equipment were provided to 29 patients. 

General immunization clinic was held for Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping 
Cough, Polio, Measles, Mumps and Rubella which 50 attended; 74 immunizations 
were given. 



68 



Swine Flu clinics were held in cooperation with the Board of Health; 
433 were immunized. 

We held 8 Senior Citizens Blood Pressure clinics which 177 attended. 

Lead screening is nov^7 being done on a regular basis at the Town Hall 
nurse's office for children ages one to six years, on the 3rd Monday of every 
month from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. No appointment is necessary. 

Four Day Care Centers (Nursery and Kidergarten) were visited for exami- 
nation of children's health records, teacher T.B. certification and one 
teaching session on health and hygiene for each school. 

In addition, the following duties were performed: 

(1) maintenance, stocking and reporting of biologies and diagnostic 
supplies ; 

(2) advice, referral and resource information given in response to 
telephone inquiries; 

(3) assisting school nurses and pre-school vision screening clinic; 

(4) T.B. skin-testing and reading, by appointment, at the Town Hall; 
and 

(5) appointments for chest X-rays made when necessary. 

PERMITS ISSUED 

Food Service - Restaurants and Counter Bars 14 

Food Service - Stores and Markets 6 

Temporary Food Service 12 

Food Service - Mobile 7 

Milk Licenses - Vehicle and Stores 8 

Bakeries 2 

Ice cream Making 1 

Laundromats 1 

Funeral Directors 3 

Syringe Permits 2 

Horse and Animal Permits 34 

Septic Installer's Permits 28 

Septic Pumpers and Carters 10 

Board of Health Permits for Building 53 

TOTAL INCOME BOARD OF HEALTH $3,863.00 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 

In 1976, the Town gave its support for the Outreach Program by partial 
funding. At Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $9,000. was appropriated. The 
program is currently being administered by the Medfield Committee, Inc. 

Statistics - January 1976 thru December 1976: 

One hundred and seventeen people have had individualized or family con- 
tact with the outreach worker regarding a range of issues including family 



69 



conflicts, runaway, alcohol and drug abuse, school issues and crisis inter- 
vention. There have been approximately one thousand contacts with these 
people . 

Additionally, there have been group sessions of which the Outreach Worker, 
Mrs. Isabel Rabe, has been an integral part. These sessions have included the 
following number of people: 

A) High School groups related to 15 classes (approximately 
drugs and alcohol 20 students in each class) 

B) Community "Awareness" series including 80 attended 
six lectures and discussion groups re- 
lated to family issues, drugs, alcohol, 

sexuality for youth and adults. 

C) League of Women Voters Unit on Sexual 35 attended 
trauma - Rape crisis counseling - adult. 

D) In addition, introduced the Outreach 
position to several other high school 
classes. 

The Outreach Worker can be contacted by the Medfield Police to counsel 
victims of rape and other sexual trauma. A short-term crisis oriented 
approach will be used. Mrs. Rabe has been trained in this crisis approach 
through seminars and workshops at Boston College. 

Mrs. Rabe has served as a resource person to the Norfolk County District 
Attorney's Juvenile Diversion Program. Her function has been to help evalu- 
ate the proper dispositon for the individuals referred by the Medfield Police 
to the program. She has been involved in individual and group counseling and 
made recommendations for referrals to other necessary social service agencies. 

For the last nine months, the outreach worker has served on the Youth 
Advisory Commission which serves as an advocacy/advisory board for youth. It 
endorses programs and issues and does follow-up with the existing town depart- 
ments. 

The prime purpose of the Outreach program continues to be aimed at crisis 
intervention, short-term counseling, and referral to other social service 
agencies. The Outreach Worker has gained cooperation from the school depart- 
ment — guidance, administration and teachers; special services; the police and 
the courts; and state and private social service agencies. 

BOARD OF HEALTH MEETINGS 

The Medfield Board of Health normally holds meetings on the second and 
fourth Mondays of each month at the Town House. These meetings are open to 
the public and citizens are invited to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TkomcU) A. CaAagjbLan, CkcuAman 
fMancAA X, CuunAif, Cl2Ak 
ZiakoAd H. iJJk^Zan 
MEDFIELD BOARD OF HEALTH 



70 



THE MEDFIELD-NORWOOD MENTAL HEALTH 
AND RETARDATION AREA BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medf ield-Norwood Mental Health and Retardation Area Board of the 
Department of Mental Health consists of 21 citizens appointed by the Governor 
to act as representatives of their communities in issues regarding the compre- 
hensive delivery of mental health and retardation services. 

The Area Board representative from Medfield for 1976-1977 is: 

Margaret Vasaturo 1 Emerson Road 359-4320 

For questions or suggestions regarding mental health and retardation 
services, call your Area Board representative, or, the Area Office in 
Medfield at 727-8908, or 359-4312, extension 203. 

Respectfully submitted. 



The Medfield-Norwood Mental Health 
and Retardation Area Board 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Norfolk County Mosquito Control 
Project of its activities in the Town of Medfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

Aerial applied larvicide 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 

Catch basin application for larvicide and adulticide 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 

Aerial U. L. V. adulticide application 

Ground U. L. V. adulticide application 

Drainage ditches cleaned 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 

Culverts cleaned and opened 

Recorded calls for information and assistance 

Respectfully submitted. 



S up er in t end en t 
71 



1770 


acres 


170 


acres 


661 




5670 


acres 


3840 


acres 


341 


acres 


8650 


feet 


400 


feet 


23 




39 






Bicentennial Tree Dedication 



72 



THE TREE WARDEN AND 
INSECT PEST CONTROL DIRECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Routine maintenance of the town shade trees consisting of pruning out 
dangerous deadwood and removing low limbs was carried out on many roadside 
trees during the past year. Over twenty-eight dead or dangerous trees were 
removed. The most conspicuous project of the Tree Department consisted of 
planting the trees and shrubs in front of the Town Hall and also in the park 
beside Meeting House Pond. I recommend the sum of $10,675.00 be appropri- 
ated for the Care of Trees program for 1977-78. 

Forty shade trees of such varieties as White Ash, Shademaster Locust, 
Sugar Maple and Pin Oaks were planted at various locations along the town 
streets. We are attempting to start some miniparks in various prominent 
locations in the coming year along with some "in-sidewalk" planting of shade- 
trees to assist in beautifying the central business district. 

The insect pest problems have not changed appreciably over the last 
year, however the Gypsy Moths in neighboring towns seem to be increasing 
and we may expect an influx of this pest within the next two years. The 
Fall Web Worm was more of a pest in 1976 than in 1975 and is expected to be 
more serious this coming season for which additional spraying may be neces- 
sary. We have cut out a lot of Wild Cherry trees that harbour most of the 
nests of webworms. I recommend the sum of $2550.00 be appropriated for 
the Insect Pest Control program. 

The Dutch Elm Disease is still present and we lose more of our stately 
Elms each year. This past year two prominent Elms were injected with 
Lignasen BLP as an erradicant treatment after the disease was detected in 
the trees. These trees will have to be injected again this year and only 
time will let us know if we were successful. I recommend the sum of 
$2325.00 be appropriated for 1977-78. 

One spray was applied this season for the control of mosquitoes. I 
have recommended two sprays this year as this is what has been most satis- 
factory in the past but the last two years the town meeting has only 
approved money for one spray. For the fiscal year 1977-78 I recommend the 
sum of $4200.00 for two sprays to control mosquitoes. 

Respectfully submitted. 



EUaA N. AlZm, Tree Warden and 
Local Director of Insect Pests 



73 







c 




o 


UD 


(/) 


[^ 


Q. 


<T> 


^ 




o 




-C 


>^ 


1— 


(O 




s: 


c 




c 


1 


«a: 


■o 


>^ 


, — 


JO 


O) 






o 


H^ 


+-) 


"O 


o 


d) 


-C 



Wmmm 



74 



THE PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Park and Recreation Commission continues to function as a body re- 
sponsive to the recreational needs of our community. The different programs 
offered to the community continue to be varied and yet we believe reflect the 
changing demands of the people. Soccer continues to be the biggest partici- 
pational activity for our school age children, while the summer playground 
attendance almost doubled from the previous years. 

This year, our 325th, and our Nation's 200th, continued to see this Com- 
mission improve our existing facilities. With a $25,000 grant from the 
Community Development Act, the Commission renovated part of Metacomet Park 
with the creation of soccer fields. 

The future goal of this Commission is to continue its present improvement 
and addition of facilities to meet today's as well as tomorrow's needs. 

Again we wish to thank all of those town residents who give of their time 
to help the Commission maintain the quality of its programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Enlc W. O'Bnlzn, Chairman 

BoAbaAR IhatLii, Clerk 

{}}WUjm J. He^^eA 

GdYiio, Rob^/vU 

{lJaAA2.n F. Shexvid 

ZickoAd VeSoAgh2A 

knthvit F. McEvof/, ^e^Zgno^d 

1U,ckcuid E. U-ickoAJbOYi 

RZchcUid CciYvUtoUi, Coordinator 



75 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



The Medfield Community Gardens opened on May 1, 1976 on a parcel of 
town owned land off Dale Street adjacent to the Town garage. This area was 
divided into 42 plots of 20 x 30 feet and assigned to town residents for an 
annual rental fee of $5. 

The first year's operation was a great success due primarily to the 
spirit of cooperation among all the participants. In particular, the 
committee wishes to thank Mr. Roy Owen for his expert advice and assistance 
to many of the novice gardeners and to Mr. Robert Bryant, Mr. Charles Evans 
and Mr. Robert Kennedy of the Medfield Highway and Water Departments for 
their efforts in hauling loam from the town property on Hospital Road, for 
staking and preparing the plots and installing water lines. 

After the close of the first season, the Highway Department again assist- 
ed with the hauling of loam from the police station construction site which 
will allow the addition of six plots for next season. Total revenue turned 
over to the town for rental of the plots was $210. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E££en G-L{^lon.d, Coordinator 

R. EdwoAd BmAd 

Joan M. B^uno 

GviJywidQ, H. EhnoA 

Vo/iM> E. KqIZoa 

biAjJUxim y[AjidioY\Jji 

Roy OiO^n 

MoaJ^o Vdd^AzlYli 

lA^Yida F. (jJklchjOAd 




■ Ai, 




First Year's Crop at Community Gardens 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



76 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In response to the need for an ongoing conference to study, relate to, 
and deal with the problems and goals of youth within the community, the first 
Youth Advisory Commission was appointed by the Board of Selectmen in May, 
1976. Its membership is composed of a cross-section of Town government and 
the community, as it includes four high school students, one member each of 
the Board of Selectmen, Park and Recreation Commission, School Committee, 
Clergy, and Police Department, and also the Outreach Worker. Realizing that 
the Commission was undertaking a responsibility of an extremely broad scope, 
the membership at the first meeting agreed that the Conunission would more 
clearly define its role and function after having been in existence for a 
few months. The Commission's experience led it to conclude recently that the 
Board should serve as an advocate, and not as a sponsor, of youth programs. 
As such, the Commission will listen to statements of problems and recommenda- 
tions, and aid a youth by directing him to, and perhaps appearing with him at 
a meeting of, the Board or organization which will deal with the particular 
matter. The Commission will also look into projects of its own accord, and 
will pursue appropriate action. 

During its brief existence, the Youth Advisory Commission has been in- 
volved in a road rally and in an unfairly, adversely publicized outdoor rock 
concert. The Commission, after study and discussion, advocated full imple- 
mentation of the District Attorney's youth diversion program, establishment 
of a mini-recreation center, courses in health and drug education in the Med- 
field school system, and passage of legislation increasing the legal age for 
consumption of alcoholic beverages in Massachusetts to twenty-one years. The 
Board also organized a "clean-up" campaign, which was manifested by a fleet 
of youth who on several occasions removed litter from various areas of Town. 
The Commission has designed a questionnaire which will be distributed early 
in 1977 to all Medfield high school students, in an attempt to ascertain what 
are their attitudes and opinions about a number of issues, including educa- 
tional curricula, recreational opportunities, and law enforcement; the results 
of the survey will hopefully guide us in future decision-making, as we believe 
that we must know how Medfield 's youth feel about the issues, and what they 
will actively support, before we can take concrete and effective action. 

Future undertakings of the Youth Advisory Commission include application 
for federal funds for the construction and development of an "Outward Bound" 
type recreational program, and a meeting of the Commission in open session 
before the high school student body. 



77 



We wish to thank all of those who contributed to make the Commission's 
first year a successful one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. EdnxiAci BdoJid, CkcuAman 
RlchoAd V2Son.gh(ZA, \Ji.c(i-ChcujimoiYi 
l^aboJi Rabt, SzcA^JjoAy 
Vawn Alls tin 
Paul E. Non.cA066 
RobeAJt Maaghton 
Tkom(U LQ,nnon 
J dan UlghtlnQotn 

Toby Lomk2A, K^^acAjOuto, l\(ur\bQA. 
YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 





■ 






HHt^^ ^^" s .l^J . 



Miss Medfield and Her Court 
78 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for Veterans' Benefits Assistance and Veterans' 
Services for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services : 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel and medical expenses for 
Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty percent to the 
community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 28 

Benefits Administered 21 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

This program is designed to orient and educate the veteran with regard 
to Federal and State programs of assistance and direct them toward the insti- 
tutional program. 

Hospitalization 11 

Education 27 

Burial Allowance 18 

Civil Service 12 

Social Security 37 

Pension Assistance 29 

I wish to thank Charlotte Randolph and town officials for their cooper- 
ation and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



VauZ F. CuAAan, 
Veterans ' Agent 



79 



THECOUNCILON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging in submitting this report on the past year 
realizes that much still needs to be done for the Senior Citizens in Medfield 
and the Council members are looking forward to a busy and productive year. 

Our areas of interest and support are: 

Housing for the Elderly - Tilden Village is now a reality, one we have 
long needed and worked toward. 

Lunch program at the Dale Street School with hope of expanding program 
to include the Junior High due to the Junior High's proximity to Tilden 
Village. 

Sunshine Visitor was made available to the Council through a federal 
program. Olga Harrington visits the elderly to assess their needs and make 
available information and services to senior citizens of Medfield. 
Mrs. Harrington reports monthly to the Council who has also been paying her 
transportation costs. An article will be placed in the warrant requesting 
$2,000 to pay for Mrs. Harrington's salary to continue this much needed ser- 
vice. Funding from the federal grant program has been discontinued. 

Newsletter , HOPE (Help O^lder P^eople Enjoy) printed and mailed monthly to 
approximately 600 senior citizens with a calendar of activities and notices 
of events, noting those who are ill and would welcome visitors or cards. 
This year we will include information about various social service programs, 
food stamp program, medicare, etc. 

Questionnaire to all elderly seeking information to help ascertain their 
needs. It is still in the process of tabulation. 

Discounts to all senior citizens from cooperating merchants of Medfield 
with decals placed on businesses involved in this program. 

Entertainment and lectures are provided monthly with concerts and plays 
added to the program through the Medfield Schools. 

Transportation via bus trips to points of interest. We are adding two 
(2) additional pickup stops this year. The central pickup has been the com- 
munity center. Added to that will be Wilkins Glen and Tilden Village. The 
Fish Organization is available to all for personal trips. 



80 



Health Services included influenza immunization program provided for all 
elderly desiring one, and blood pressure tests taken once a month at Wilkins 
Glen by the Visiting Nurse. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Etlzabdth L. Ucwtin, Chairman 
ThomcUi I/. Su)^Q,n2-y, S^. 
Mad2£elnQ, I. Ha/icLLng 
G2.Yi2vl2VQ, K. Re^agan 
BoAboA/i VoXt^AoVi 

\jAjlQA,¥UjOi Cowp2A 

ktUon M. iiVUak 
EdMin C. VbikQJvtij 
VoKotky kvKUtiul 
COUNCIL ON AGING 



s %M 





ECUMENICAL SERVICE 

Rev. Robert Gregg, United Church; Rabbi Henry Zoob , Temple 
Beth David, Westwood; Rev. Robert Thayer, First Parish 
Unitarian; Reb . Paul Norcross, Baptist Church; Arthur McCarty, 
representing Christian Science membership; Father Mark Hannon, 
St. Edward's Church; Rev. David Flanders, Church of the 
Advent Episcopal 



81 



THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

I have issued a total of 255 Building permits (1975 - 230) as listed 
below, and have made a total of 1,148 inspections (1975 - 1,350) together 
with Rebel Palumbo, Assistant Building Inspector and with Richard Ostrander. 
Thomas Sweeney also filled in with assistance with Zoning Enforcing duties 
until he was appointed as Zoning Enforcing Officer at which time he took over 
full duties of that office. 

The following is a breakdown of permits issued: 

New single family dwellings 71 

New two-family dwellings 1 

Additions to private dwellings 24 

Renovations to private dwellings 47 

Multi-family, 42 units 1 

Renovations to business buildings 2 

Additions to business buildings 4 

New business buildings 2 

Private swimming pools 16 

Private horse stables/barns 3 
Reshingling roofs and installation 

of new sidewalls 56 

Accessory bldgs. (greenhouses, sheds, etc.) 4 

Residential garages 4 

Demolitions 9 

Tents (temporary) 3 

Signs 6 

Structures other than buildings 2 

TOTAL PERMITS 255 

Total income from Building permit fees 

(1975 - $6,164.21) $5,682.50 

Total income from inspections for Certifications 

(1975 - $3,301.50) $1,103.70 

Total income 1976 

(1975 - $9,465.71) $6,786.20 

Estimated construction costs on new dwellings 

(1975 - $1,810,000.00) $2,463,500.00 

Estimated construction cost renovations, 

additions, pools, shingling & sidewalls $413,267.00 

(1975 - $375,044.00) 



82 




83 



Renovations and additions on business $132,500.00 

(1975 - $57,250.00) 

New construction on business/industrial $259,000.00 

(1975 - $179,000.00) 

New multi-family building - 42 units $600,000.00 

(1975 - $1,262,717.00) 

Tlie Building Inspector continued to enforce the State Building Code which 
took effect on January 1, 1975 requiring the inspection of schools, churches, 
rest homes as well as all places of assembly. As mandated by the Massachusetts 
Department of Community Affairs, the inspectors attended courses which led to 
the certification of both Mr. Palumbo, Assistant Inspector and myself by that 
department of the Commonwealth. 

All applications for signs in the business district are now being reviewed 
by the office of Building Inspector thus requiring more inspection time. An- 
other time-consuming duty of the Building Inspector, but a necessary one, is 
the review of buildings deemed to be unsafe and posting same. 

I wish to thank the Town officials, the other department inspectors, the 
administrative secretaries in the Town Hall and Mrs. Mae Otting for the assist- 
ance and cooperation they have rendered to me. In particular, I would like to 
note my appreciation for the superb cooperation I have received from the Fire 
Chief, Joseph Ryan during our many joint inspections throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HeAboAt B. BuAA 
Inspector of Buildings 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Building Code Board of Appeals herewith submits their report for the 
year ending December 31, 1976. 

The Board held two organizational meetings to meet with the Building 
Inspector and discuss procedural items. 

There were no appeals made to the Board during 1976; thus, no other 
business was conducted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HoAAy C. HOAAOM, Chairman 

Anthony C. Ce^ntoAz 

E. PaaZ CoKkum 

Pkciip Bonanno 

Jamt6 J. IdonjOind. 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

84 



THE WIRING INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my report for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

Permits issued 249 

Inspections made 415 

Income from wiring permits $2,315.00 

Departmental expenses $3,591.03 

I wish to thank the Town House secretaries and the other inspectors for 
their help and cooperation throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

For the calendar year January 1, 1976 to December 31, 1976: 

Plumbing permits issued 127 

Permit fees turned over to Treasurer $2,340.50 

Inspections made by Plumbing Inspector 246 

Inspections made by Assistant Inspector 71 

Of the above listed inspections, 259 were regular plumbing inspections, 
58 were concerned with investigation, administration or enforcement in con- 
nection with violations. In addition, 26 letters of correspondence and 
numerous telephone calls were made in relation to violations of the State 
Plumbing Code. 

Licensing of plumbers began in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1910, 
followed shortly by a recommended State Plumbing Code. However, it was not 
until 1953 that the then small Town of Medfield first adopted a plumbing code 
of its own, with regular inspections beginning in 1953. Mr. J. Roger Petrie 
was appointed Plumbing Inspector, serving the town faithfully in that capacity 
until 1972. Mr. Walter R. Nye, Sr., was appointed Assistant Plumbing Inspec- 
tor, and has continuously served the town till the present time. Mr. George E. 
Nye, Sr., was appointed in 1972 following Mr. Petrie, and continues to serve 
in that capacity. 

In 1953, the model State Plumbing Code was a small pamphlet containing 
15 pages. Since 1965, when the Uniform State Plumbing Code was adopted by 
the legislature, the Code has gone through many changes, now containing 



85 



183 pages in a 8" x 12" notebook form. These rules and regulations were 
adopted and are enforced to protect the public health and safety. 

We wish to thank the other Town Inspectors, the Selectmen's Office, and 
Mrs. Mae Otting, Secretary for the Inspection Department for their assistance 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



THE GAS INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Gas Inspector for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

Number of permits issued 91 

Total fees collected $860.50 

Inspections by Gas Inspector 84 

Inspections by Acting Inspector 21 

Total Inspections 105 

Seven inspections were made to enforce correction of code violations or 
to investigate complaints of gas leaking. 

I wish to thank Mrs. Mae Otting for a fine job in taking over the issu- 
ing of permits and bookkeeping for my department. 

Respectfully submitted. 



WoZ^eA R. Hyo,, Gas inspector 



86 



THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my annual report for the year 1976. 

Scales Sealed 

Over 10,000 lbs. 1 

5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 

100 to 5,000 lbs. 6 

Under 100 lbs. 23 



Weights 

Avoirdupois 
Apothecary 



29 
22 



Automatic Measures 
Gas Pumps 
Grease Pumps 

Yard Sticks 

Tapes 



30 

1 
3 





Total 



113 



Trial Weighings of Commodities 

Unit prices in stores checked weekly. 

Expenses 
Salary 

Telephone and Transportation 
Bond 
Supplies 

Receipts 

Sealing Fees 



220 



$239. 


,00 


82. 


,00 


20. 


,00 








$321.00 



$121.50 



Respectfully submitted. 



liichcKit W. TammoAo, 

Sealer Weights and Measures 



87 




88 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my report for the year ending December 1976. 

Twenty-nine dogs were examined for having bitten or scratched people. 
These animals were subsequently quarantined for a period of ten days. When 
these animals were checked at the end of the quarantine period, none of them 
showed any evidence of rabies. Two bats, one cat, one rat and a squirrel 
were sent to the Wasserman Laboratory for examination for rabies. One of the 
bats showed evidence of rabies inclusion bodies in the brain and state and 
federal authorities were notified. 

Thirty-seven stables and paddocks used for shelters for horses, cattle, 
sheep, swine or goats were examined for general cleanliness, sufficient water, 
adequate light and conformance to board of health rules and regulations. 

For the annual inspection a total of 112 horses, 17 ponies, 16 cattle, 
37 sheep and 4 goats were inspected for, and appeared to be free from, any 
communicable diseases. 

Respectfully submitted, 

iJJ^buA M. SaJU^, V.VM. 
Animal Inspector 
{jJitbLam JznneJXe, 
Assistant Animal Inspector 

THE DOG OFFICER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Dog Officer for the year ending December 31, 
1976. 

Number of complaints responded to 1,130 

Amount of money assessed in fines $ 560.00 

Dogs killed by automobiles 21 

Dogs picked up by Dog Officer 366 

Court citations given 233 

People required to attend court 4 

People found guilty by District Court 4 

Injured animals attended to 97 

Dogs registered in 1976 1,220 

Kennels registered 1976 23 

Dogs returned to other towns 37 

At this time I would like to thank the Animal Humane Society of Medfield 
for their unselfish work in finding homes for unwanted animals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WLttiam J. JZYinoJXd,, 
Dog Officer 

89 




TOWN HALL BEFORE PLAZA BUILT 



90 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Development and Industrial Commission continued to be thwarted in 
its efforts to make any major forward steps toward bringing industry into 
Medfield. 

Nevertheless, several fruitful contacts were made with local industry 
and one very large national employer, and the outlook for future development 
of two properties seems favorable. 

The Commission was very successful in pursuing one of its additional 
charges, assigned to it by the Board of Selectmen in 1975, that being the 
beautif ication of the Central Business District. In May of 1976 the new 
Town Hall Plaza was completed. It has proven to be an inspirational impetus 
for the advancement of beautif ication not only for the Town but for the 
merchants located in the center. In this connection, the Medfield Garden 
Club and the other Boards and Departments of the Town, with particular em- 
phasis upon the Highway, Water & Sewer, and Tree Departments, must be 
mentioned as being particularly helpful and cooperative. Many individuals 
and service organizations also made considerable contributions toward the 
completion of the project. 

The commission is aware that its work must by its very nature move 
ahead without interruption in spite of the many obstacles which stand in the 
way of its fulfilling its prime purpose. The Town is not the owner of any 
of the land which could be developed industrially, and this of itself makes 
progress difficult, because the Commission's purposes are often not the same 
as those of the owners of the land. Neither is the Commission in a position 
where it can negotiate. Therefore, it must operate within very narrow con- 
straints, acting at its best as a catalyst between industrial landowners and 
potential builders of industrial plants. This is the charge which must con- 
tinue to be pursued, even during the most discouraging periods. 

The Commission regrets the departure from its membership of John Ekstrom 
and Arnold Coda, both having made notable contributions toward the Commis- 
sion's work. The Commission owes a debt of gratitude toward the many Boards 
and employees of the Town, without whose help its efforts would go for naught. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ifJatt^A M. F/iank, Chairman 
Geo/Lge GnRkam 
Tn.LmayL HoXkoAton 
VonaZd H. HoJicLlng 
iJjAlLiam P. HikdioYvU 
Norman G^ay 



91 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee was organized in the summer of 1976 to pursue the improve- 
ment of parking in the central business district with specific recommendations 
to be made to the Board of Selectmen by September 1, 1976. This initial 
charge was successfully accomplished so that these recommendations could be 
coordinated with the planning being done by the Town with the aid of the 
Department of Public Works for the reconstruction of North Street. 

Later in the year the Commission voluntarily increased its charge to 
encompass (a) to find additional parking areas which might be acquired by the 
Town, (b) to review traffic rules and regulations throughout the central busi- 
ness district, (c) to contribute suggestions for beautifying the downtown area 
and, (d) to act as a listening post for the merchants to make their views 
effectively known. Thus, the Committee whose membership, by design, is heavily 
weighted by merchants and members at large, has taken the stand that its work 
should continue on a more permanent basis. Many meetings were held during the 
Fall with the merchants and other Town Departments to plan for the future. A 
cooperative spirit has been indicated by several of the merchants, who have 
already made improvements on their own. It is clear that through the medium 
of this Committee, much progress can be made by the townspeople, the merchants, 
and the corporate body, working together toward one common goal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WoX^eA VKRYlk, Chairman 
iJJWUam H. Ma/in 
iJJUtlam E. HcCoAtky 
KmnoXk Ck^ZcU 
AlZan La/ikA-n 

LokAjClLyiq, HoZZand 

F^ed ClcvwidQ^ 

MoAgoAoX E^cLt2.n 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



93 




1906 PICTURE OF FIRST PARISH MEETING HOUSE CONSTRUCTED IN 1789 
DESIGNATED NATIONAL REGISTERED LANDMARK IN 1976 



94 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

The Historical Commission submits herewith its fourth annual report, 
covering the calendar year 1976, during which we met monthly; and which was 
the 325th Anniversary of Medfield' s incorporation as a town, the 300th year 
since the burning by King Philip's Indians, as well as the National Bicenten- 
nial. As our name itself indicates, most of our activities during the past 
year, as indeed continuously since 1973, have been related in some way to the 
1976 celebrations. Hence, we believe that a fairly detailed account of our 
work in 1976 is desirable and that a slight repetition under the first head- 
ing below is permissible. 

1. National Register of Historic Places . 

Two Medfield structures proposed for this listing by the Medfield 
Historical Commission were approved by the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
and the National Park Service. These buildings were: 

The First Parish Meeting House - as of April 19, 1974 

The Peak House - 347 Main Street - as of September 26, 1975 

(See To\<m Reports of those years for details; and also pages 55 and 

56 of Medfield Reflections , published by the Bicentennial Commission, 

where there is given the best documented account possible as of 

January 1977 regarding the probable age of the Peak House.) 

2. History of Medfield 1649 - 1886 . 

The above history by William S. Tilden, reprinted in 1975, sold so well 
that the bill could be paid early in 1976 by the Medfield Historical Society 
without utilizing the $1,500 loan that had been voted by the Town Meeting of 
April 1975 under Article 38 sponsored by this Commission. (Copies of the 
book are still available from the Medfield Historical Society headquarters at 
6 Pleasant Street on Saturday mornings.) 

3. Historic Names Suggested by the Commission . 

(a) Approved by the April 1976 Town Meeting were the following: 

Meetinghouse Pond (Article 28) - This name seems of more permanent 
significance than 19th century designations referring to businesses 
which no longer exist. There has been a meeting house on the present 
site of the First Parish Church since the early 1650 's and the build- 
ing is now on the National Register of Historic Places. The nam.e 
Meetinghouse Pond dates back to 1794 when Artemas Woodward was given 
permission to flood his meadow beside the meetinghouse. The Town 
purchased the pond area in 1946 to prevent commercial development. 

Brooks and Streams Crossing Major Highways (Article 24) . 

The following names were adopted as official: Mill Brook, Vine Brook, 



95 



Winter Brook, North Brook, Nantasket Brook and Stop River. Maps 
marked to indicate the routes of the above and detailed notations 
on their many changes of direction were prepared by Donald MacDonald 
and David Wilmarth and are in the Town Clerk's files. Most of the 
names suggested are of long usage; an exception is Nantasket Brook 
from a name applied by the Indians to the area near the present 
junction of Main and Pound Streets, and mentioned in early land grants. 

(b) Names for the Senior Citizens' Housing Complex on Pound Street 

suggested to the Medfield Housing Authority. 
Tilden Village - after our distinguished Medfield historian, 
William S. Tilden (1830-1912). 

For the separate houses : Two landholders whose original grants were 
either within or close to Tilden Village. These were: 

Samuel Bullen - Grant #3. 

Francis Hamant - Grant #7. 

Margaret Shepard - the first woman landholder in Medfield. She 
came in 1651 with the Braintree group after 
her husband's death. 

George Barber - Selectman 1652-1662, Town Clerk 23 years, 

military officer, built first mill, laid out 
first highways, served in General Court. 

Henry Adams - first Town Clerk, Selectman, Representative 
to General Court, military officer, slain by 
Indians in 1676; descendant of Henry of 
Braintree, from whom our pioneer historian 
Hannah Adams, as well as the presidential 
Adamses, are also descended. 

George Inness - celebrated landscape painter, who lived in 
Medfield 1859-1865, and who painted here 
some of his best known pictures such as 
"Peace and Plenty" and "Medfield Meadows." 

4. Restoration of Early Town Documents . 

A small beginning on this type of work was made in 1976, with the coopera- 
ation of the Town Clerk, who has legal custody of such material. In June 
Mr. Andrew Raymond, State Documents Analyst (from the Office of Secretary of 
the Commonwealth Guzzi) inspected several of our early records. At 
Mr. Raymond's suggestions, some of these were taken to the New England 
Documents Conservation Center in North Andover, Massachusetts, and estimates 
obtained for "restoration" which usually includes washing de-acidifying and 
rebinding. 

The Selectmen's Records 1817-1857, which had been scorched in one of the 
Town House fires, were left at the Center, where after preliminary treatment, 
each separate page was enclosed in a mylar case, the pages numbered in pencil 
to permit reading in proper order, and the complete succession of pages de- 
livered in a book-like box, labelled on the "spine." (Rebinding was not 
possible because of the scorched edges of the leaves.) This work was made 
possible by funds remaining at the end of the fiscal year 1976 in the budgets 
of both the Commission and the Town Clerk; and the restored "book" was ex- 
hibited by the latter at the Hometown Exposition in September. 

In November 1976 the Massachusetts Council on Arts and Humanities awarded 
us $140 as a "matching grant" for the restoration of the Selectmen's Records 



1796-1816. The Selectmen have offered a generous amount to help us "meet the 
match." 

To our best knowledge, it was not customary for Selectmen to keep records 
separate from Town Meeting records prior to 1830. We note after careful per- 
usal that Medfield's two sets of early Selectmen's records give a much clearer 
picture of Town responsibilities and their implementation 1796-185 7 than can 
be drawn from the Town Meeting records. We hope to publicize soon interesting 
details from these records. 

5. Sewer Routes and Indian Sites . 

The interest of the Medfield Historical Commission in this subject is 
dictated by its purpose as stated in Chapter 40, Section 8D of the General 
Laws to be "for the preservation, protection, and development of the historic- 
al or archeological assets of such city or town. Such commission shall con- 
duct researches for places of historic or archeological value, shall cooperate 
with the state archeologist in conducting such researches or other surveys." 

In pursuance of these obligations, after attending the open hearing 
conducted on February 4 by Mr. Leon Bombardier of Weston and Sampson, Engineers 
we presented to the Water and Sewerage Board evidence that the upland areas 
along the proposed Horse Brook, Sewall Brook and Charles River interceptor are 
sensitive Indian settlement sites. This evidence was in the form of letters 
from Mrs. Anne Chick, William Rogers, Frederick Schultz and Mrs. Richard Palson 
of Medfield, as well as Mrs. Elizabeth R. Amadon, Executive Secretary of the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission. Mrs. Chick submitted examples of Indian 
artifacts from the extensive collection made by her in conjunction with her 
late husband, Elwyn Chick, on their property near the intersection of South, 
Spring and High Streets. 

On the basis of the above-mentioned evidentiary material, and after con- 
sultation with Dr. Maurice Robbins, State Archeologist, the commission re- 
quested that an archeological survey be undertaken before construction on the 
sewer interceptor projects should be started. 

In August, we wrote Weston and Sampson that we saw no reason to object to 
the proposed street sewers in the Bridge Street and Charlesdale Road areas; 
but reiterated our request that there be an archeological survey before the 
beginning of work in the Horse Brook and Sewall Brook areas. We also said 
that we thought that this survey should be more thorough than the "walk-over" 
type. 

In September, we were informed by Weston and Sampson that the Environ- 
mental Protection Administration had agreed to provide funding for a walkover 
archeological survey in the proposed interceptor areas, and that the subsequent 
report on this survey would determine whether there was need for a more inten- 
sive survey. 

In December, the contract for the walkover survey was awarded to Brown 
University, under the direction of James Deetz with the required approval from 
the State Archeologist. Dr. David Wilmarth of our Commission, walked most of 
the proposed interceptor routes with Brown University archeologists and 
engineers from Weston and Sampson. We are expecting momentarily the report of 
this group. 



97 



6. Historical Inventory of the Town . 

This inventory which was begun by the Medfield Historical Society in the 
1960's, and enlarged since 1973 by this commission, has again been continued 
in 1976 by Mrs. Eleanor Anes , Mrs. Ann Mentzer and Mrs. Patricia Rioux, with 
assistance from members of the Historical Society. The Commission should soon 
be able to present a geographically arranged plan of the Town's historical 
assets for the consideration of Town boards and other citizens interested in 
preserving these assets when plans for the future are contemplated. 

7. Historic District Study Committee . 

This committee instituted by the Selectmen in 1976, has one representa- 
tive from this Commission, Mrs. Ann Mentzer. This committee will make use of 
the Historic Inventory in future recommendations to the Town concerning pos- 
sible creation of Historic Districts. 

8. Cemetery Inscriptions . 

Photocopies were made of a book (in the possession of the Medfield 
Historical Society) which contains the exact wording of gravestone inscrip- 
tions in Vine Lake Cemetery from 1651 to December 1899. As a result, work has 
begun on matching these inscriptions to a numbered plot plan of cemetery lots 
given us by Mr. Joseph Roberts of the Cemetery Commission, who reports that 
the records necessary to correlate inscriptions with lot numbers were destroy- 
ed in the Town Hall fire of 1924. Mrs. Evelyn Gruhn has been assisting the 
Commission in this "matching" process, which should bring to light many inter- 
esting aspects of our early history. 

9. Local Growth Policy Committee . 

Mrs. Eleanor Anes represented the Historical Commission on this committee, 
which met almost weekly for several months in the first half of 1976. At 
Mrs. Anes' suggestion, there was included in the committee's report to the 
Town and the State a recommendation that an historic preservation plan should 
be incorporated in Medfield' s Master Plan. 

As is apparent throughout this report, the work of this Commission in 
1976 was very dependent on the willing cooperation that we received from other 
Town boards and officials. We would like to thank, also, Michael Sullivan, 
Pauline Goucher, Charlotte Randolph and Nancy Franke, for assistance on 
-(troublesome details. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lau/LCi H. SnUXk, CkcuAman 

Vavid WLbnoAtk, Ulco, CkcuAman 

BuAge^4 P. SiayidZay, So^cAoXaAy 

NoHman Gnjay, J^. , VlnoincyiaJi Se^cAoXoAy 

Et^anoA Ane^ 

Ann MeKitzeA 

PoX/UcMl Rloui)c 

VonaJtd J. UacVonatd, k^^odiatQ, MembeA 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



98 




-a 
o <u 

o Cd 
>- JD 

oc o 
<: I— 



99 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

Our first meetings were held in the fall and dealt with the preliminaries 
of forming a study committee and reviewing the enabling legislation concerning 
Historic Districts. The Historic District Act, Chapter 40 C of the General 
Laws, was enacted by Chapter 372 of the Acts of 1960. All but section one of 
that Act was amended by Chapter 359 of the Acts of 1971. We also met with 
Mrs. Patricia Weslowski, Survey Director of the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission, who advises committees in towns on their Historic District studies. 

The purpose of the Study Committee is to make recommendations to the town 
for eventual Town Meeting approval of areas proposed for Historic Districts. 

The purpose of the Historic District, which will be administered by an 
Historic District Commission, is to preserve and protect the distinctive 
characteristics of buildings and places significant in the history and de- 
velopment of our town; to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings 
and places, and to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in 
the districts. 

The Historic District should offer a visual example of Medfield 's histor- 
ic and cultural heritage. To its residents, the District offers a measure of 
protection from the decrease of land values through deterioration of neighbor- 
hood blight. 

Our first meetings also included discussions of various historically or 
architecturally significant areas of the town with particular emphasis on the 
most endangered locations. 

We are indebted to the Historical Commission for their continuing House 
Inventory program which is an integral part of this study and will save con- 
siderable time and duplication of effort in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L^^ttQ, HoiajIqJX, CkcuAman 
Ann MenXzeA, So^cAeXoAy 
Ann SnjOiyton 
Vonald McDonald 



100 




c 



.Ifi 

JUNE STH- 11, „ 



^^1 





325th ANNIVERSARY PARADE 




101 




102 



325th ANNIVERSARY AND 
SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1976, the 325th Anniversary and Special Bicentennial Coiranittee pre- 
sented twelve events by and for our fellow townspeople commemorating our 
nation's Bicentennial and our town's 325th anniversary. 

The 300th anniversary of the burning of Medfield by King Philip was 
observed at the Town House on February 21st, coordinated by Mr. Robert Coulter, 
and researched by Richard DeSorgher and Richard G. Kenney. Although the day 
was cold, a great many of our townspeople attended. Several high school 
students participated by not only expressing the views of the Indians and 
settlers, but also presented a symbolic burning ceremony depicting the home- 
steads which were burned. Under the leadership of Mr. William McVicar, the 
Medfield Companies of Militia and Minutemen contributed a great deal of real- 
ism to the ceremony. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas V. Sweeney chaired and produced one of the finest 
variety shows in the town's history in February. Our senior citizens were 
invited to view our "old-fashioned show" as our guests the first night, and 
the entire three nights were standing-room-only performances. Through the 
tireless efforts of Tom and Elizabeth and the performers, approximately 1500 
of us laughed, clapped, and sang along. The grand finale was a particularly 
moving chorus of "God Bless America". Mr. Elton Basset t and family should be 
noted for an excellent job of stage management. 

Members of all faiths gathered together on Sunday, April 25th at Saint 
Edward's Catholic Church, under the leadership of Mr. Edward Otting, Mrs. 
Clinton Clark, and Mrs. Joseph Bruno. Clergy of all faiths participated in- 
cluding Father Ryan and Father Hannon of St. Edward's; Rev. Flanders of the 
Church of the Advent; Rev. Gregg, United Church of Christ; Rev. Norcross, 
First Baptist Church; Rev. Thayer of the Unitarian Church; Arthur McCarty of 
Christian Science denomination and Rabbi Zook of the Westwood Jewish Temple. 
Rain and cold outside did not have any effect, as the church was filled with 
warmth and friendship on the inside. This occasion is believed to be the very 
first in Medfield' s history that the clergy of all faiths have joined together 
to enjoy a true spiritual unity. Special thanks should go to the Bell Ringers 
of the United Church of Christ for their participation and the First Baptist 
Church for hosting the fine coffee reception after the service. Chorus 
members of all faiths provided meaningful and memorable hymns throughout the 
service. 

Town meeting was opened in 1976 with the reading of a Proclamation by 
Mr. Richard DeSorgher, noting the anniversary year of our nation. 

May arrived and the tempo of our town's anniversary began to swell. 
Mrs. Ronald Rioux began the town beautif ication program with the dedication 
of a 314 year-old tree, the oldest tree in town, as our Bicentennial Tree at 
the Town Pound on High Street. Appreciation is extended to our Tree Warden, 
Ellis N. Allen who aided us in this endeavor. 



103 




104 



One of the most memorable contributions of our youth was the re-enactment 
of "The Burning of the To\vn of Medfield". Town land across from the State 
Hospital provided the site; and an "original" replica of our village was re- 
created by our Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and their leaders, Mrs. Leo Holderreid 
and Mr. Richard G. Kenney, under the co-ordination of Mr. Robert Coulter. 

Mrs. Robert Maples, Mrs. Thomas McNeeley, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Belmont, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan S. Evans and Mr. and Mrs. Eric A. lafolla, combined to pro- 
duce a most memorable "Miss Medfield Pageant". Approximately thirty girls 
participated, and although this event was definitely not a "Beauty Contest", 
each girl, in her own way, was truly beautiful. Miss Sue Weagraff was the 
recipient of the first place award, and each girl received a gift for being a 
representative Medfield girl. Miss Weagraff rode in a place of honor with our 
honorary "Mayor for the Day" in our Anniversary Parade. 

The Medfield Jaycees, who were coordinated by Mrs. Ronald Rioux, conduct- 
ed a Mayoral contest. A very close and spirited battle between three front 
runners (each ballot costing five cents) resulted in the winner being 
Mr. George Hinkley. Also preparing for the Parade was the Medfield Lions Club, 
who purchased a one-quarter scale Model T Ford — both groups donating to the 
Bicentennial cause. Mr. Robert Dooley fully assembled the " sever al-hundred- 
of pieces car" with finishing touches done at Mr. Joseph L. Marcionette' s gas 
station. 

I don't think there ever has been, or ever will be, a more perfect day — 
weather-wise, spirit-wise, and community- wise than that of June 5th, our 
Anniversary Parade day. The town was decorated with bunting and logo and 
banners, logo having been designed by Ken Griffin. Long planning by 
Mr. Thomas Blake and Mrs. Francis Bibby, helped to give us a truly memorable 
event. By 6:00 a.m., units were rolling into town, and early that morning, the 
Connecticut Yanks, graciously brought here by Mr. Arthur Farrar, could be 
heard to the roll of their drums. 

The many hours of effort in planning and creating the floats of the 
various organizations and interested groups in town provided us with ingenious 
and beautiful memories. The Clydesdale horses were a sight to behold I We 
thank all those who participated including the visiting dignataries , among 
whom were our elder statesman from Dover, Senator Leverett Saltonstall, 
Representative George H. Sprague from Sherborn, Norfolk County Commissioners, 
Selectmen of neighboring towns and our own Grand Marshal, Joseph L. Marcionette, 
We were honored, too, with the presence of Mrs. Richard Huebener, who was pre- 
sent also at the 1901 celebration. The day moved along smoothly, and the 
"frosting on the cake" was an hour-long performance by the Connecticut Yanks 
at our High School field. 

On July 4th, Medfield joined with her sister towns across the nation, 
by tolling her bells at 2:00 p.m. The Unitarian Church, the Baptist Church, 
and St. Edward's Church bells rang simultaneously, and were preceded by a 
"1776" tribute by the fire whistle. We celebrated not only uniting our town 
that day, but uniting our nation. 

On September 18th, a Family Chicken Barbeque and Firemen's Muster were 
held. Mrs. John Edgar, with the cooperation of Mr. Robert Bond and Mr. Arthur 
Farrar, gave us another fun-filled family day. Members of the Boosters Club 
cooked and cooked and cooked, and Medfieldites ate, and ate and ate. The 
muster was a first-time event for many. Over 1200 people sang along with 
Melchiori's Music Makers. 



105 



Mrs. Pauline Goucher, Mrs. Ronald Rioux, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kinsman, 
and Mrs. Richard Downey, combined to hold an informative and exciting weekend, 
on September 25th and 26th, when a Memorabilia Display and an old-fashioned 
Home Town Exposition were held. Old items were literally dug out of homes 
from cellars to attics, and unbelievable crafts exhibited, being done by our 
fellow neighbors. Mr. Dan Hogan showed his slides of the events of 1976 which 
will enable future generations to witness our special year. Over 2000 people 
came from near and far to view the "mini-museum". 

On October 23rd, over 700 people gathered at Lan tana's ballroom in 
Randolph, for our never-to-be forgotten Anniversary Ball. Mr. Edward Doherty 
and Mrs. Anthony Pagliazzo, proved organization does show in the results. 
Residents stayed on long after the dance band ended, showing that the atmo- 
sphere was one of a town-together, sitting and eating with friends, dancing, 
and sharing a beautiful birthday cake. Reverend Wood, who delivered the in- 
vocation, made mention of a beautiful feeling in the room. My wife, Beverly, 
and I were deeply moved by being recognized by Representative George Sprague; 
Selectmen Chairman, Mr. Edward Beard and also by being named "Citizens of the 
Year" by the Medfield Lions Club. 

November included school programs and the closing of "Chenery Commemo- 
rative Corner". Mrs. William Hallowell and Co-Chairman Mrs. Richard Whelan, 
Financial Advisor, Mr. Edward Bayliss and Legal Counselor, Barrister Ralph 
Good, were responsible for its success, resulting in many lasting commemo- 
ratives being now in the homes of Medfield residents, as well as people who 
have been residents. Artwork for the town coin, and the town plate, were 
done by Mr. Byron Reed, and Mrs. Kenneth Brock, respectively. 

In December there was Christmas caroling, and on February 6th, 1977, at 
Tilden Village, the "Medfield Minute Maidens", under Mrs. William Hallowell, 
Publicity, and Mrs. Gail Leggett, "Minute Mom", will join with the new 
residents, on the exciting dedication of their new homes. The girls were in- 
vited to be present at the ground-breaking, and further accomplished our goal, 
of uniting youth and senior citizens. Our goal was again shown in uniting all 
area and age groups, by the completion of a beautiful town quilt, under the 
direction of Mrs. LeBaron Colt. Quilters met at Mrs. Robert Coulter's, co- 
ordinator of senior citizens, and together they watched it grow — a piece of 
art to go down in Medfield' s history. 

Mr. Edward Doherty 's Bicentennial newspaper. The Medfield Spy , kept 
residents posted and enthused about future events. 

Medfield Reflections , a hard-bound pictorial commemorative book, coordi- 
nated by Mrs. Howard Kane, and produced by Mr. Joseph Codispoti and Mr. Oney 
Shade with the help and cooperation of many other townsfolk, have given us a 
permanent record of highlights of our past, one that we are proud to pass on 
to our future generations. The Medfield Public Library, Medfield Historical 
Society and the Selectmen's Office have additional copies available for future 
purchases. 

Although it would be impossible to acknowledge everyone who generously 
contributed to our Bicentennial and Birthday activities, special thanks 
should be extended to Barrister Ralph Good, Representative George Sprague, 
the Board of Selectmen, Joseph L. Marcionette, the Auxiliary Police, Police 
Department, Fire Department, Highway Department, our schools, churches 
organizations, and above all to you - our fellow citizens of Medfield, without 
whose support and participation the successful events of 1976 would not have 
been possible. 



106 





325th ANNIVERSARY PARADE 




<^ll 





107 



All profits, not already returned to the town will be returned to the 
town shortly in the form of a lasting gift, in the hope that memories of 
1976 will never be forgotten. 

Respectfully submitted. 



WltUam L. HaZZoiMdUi, Chairman 
VoLLxLinii CoultzA 
RoboAX CoattoA 
Ba/ib(Via Ckoyilvi 
EdwoAd VohoJuty 
RoboAt E. Voole,y 
Gaylo. EdgoA 
Ralph C. Good, J/l. 
?a.uJU.Yi<i M. GouchoA 
BavQAly I. HalZovooM 
Von.othif KoLYid 
SkOil2.y Mpl(^ 
EdwoAd Ottlng 
Voutytlcyia. ZLoux 
MZahaeJt Tamm(in.o 

Ma/ule M. SuUike,, Associate Member 
Jo62.ph L. HoACLionoXtil, Honorary Chairman 
Special Bicentennial and 325th Anniversary 
Committee 




PARADE COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN HONORED 

Photo by Ann Thompson 
108 



THETRICOUNTY REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The year 1976 has witnessed the physical emergence of the Regional Voca- 
tional Technical School. It is with a great deal of satisfaction that this 
Committee can finally confirm the fact that the new school will open, as 
originally planned, in September 1977. 

In March of this year, our District office was moved from the Freeman 
Elementary School in Norfolk to St. Mary's School in Franklin. The new lo- 
cation has afforded us much needed additional space and close proximity to the 
construction site which is close to the intersection of Routes 140 and 495 in 
that town. 

The building is at this time entirely closed in and is at least fifty 
percent complete. Interior work such as partitions, floors, ceilings and 
various finish operations are well underway. All school furniture has been 
contracted for, as has been certain fixed equipment: kitchen, installed case- 
work, auditorium seating, automotive lifts, etc. Other heavy but movable 
equipment is currently out to bid and in the near future all tools, materials, 
and supplies will be provided for. 

With invaluable assistance of a number of volunteer advisory committee 
members, our staff continues to refine general course outlines toward the 
development of meaningful courses of study in all vocational and academic pro- 
gram offerings. Recognizing that educational excellence is totally dependent 
on educators elected to present such programs, we are at this time in the 
midst of interviewing, screening, and selecting the sixty teachers who will 
carry out that responsibility. 

The Fiscal Year 1977 Operating Budget which has been effective since last 
July was in the amount of $917,110.29. Medfield's assessment based on 10.25 
percent has been $94,003.80. The same percentage has been used to determine 
student quota, therefore seventy-seven Medfield ninth and tenth grade students 
will be part of the first year enrollment of seven hundred and fifty. A ninth 
grade class of three hundred and seventy-five will be admitted each year, and 
with all four grades represented in 1979 maximum enrollment will be fifteen 
hundred. 

The interest and support displayed by Medfield school personnel throughout 
our planning period has been most encouraging. Superintendent Cresto has 
participated in a number of advisory council meetings as has Robert Lynch. The 
administrators and guidance personnel have been very cooperative in arranging 
student assemblies and special parent meetings. Arrangements such as these 
have made it possible for us to inform all segments of the District public re- 
garding this new educational opportunity. 

Concern for equal educational opportunities for both sexes have been 
assigned high priority. Each of our twenty- three vocational programs have 
been designed to be equally attractive to boys and girls, and we are confident 
that appropriate work placement will be available to both upon graduation. 



109 



Similarly, we have spent a great deal of time and effort in order to as- 
sure special needs programs for the handicapped and/or disadvantaged. Special 
resource personnel will be employed to meet special needs and to guarantee 
individualized attention where needed. 

The advisory committee members from the Town of Medfield who have so 
diligently and capably served in all areas of planning are: Kenneth Childs, 
Clyde Deering, Kevin Flynn, Monya Geller, William O'Donnell, and William 
Sullivan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee 

ioKlviQ V. MaxwelZ, CkcuAman 
JamoA A. Spfiouil, Jn.. , ^{^.d^l^Zd 



SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is the report of the School Planning and Building Committee 
for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

At the Town Meeting held on April 26, 1976, $52,000 was appropriated by a 
vote of the townspeople for construction of laboratory facilities at the 
senior high school. 

On June 17, 1976 bids were opened for the renovation of two existing 
classrooms into science laboratories. This included the renovation of one 
general science room and one social studies room into a chemistry and a 
physics laboratory. Casby Brothers Construction Company was the low bidder 
and was awarded the general contract. 

Work started immediately and both laboratories were ready for occupancy 
when school started in September. This included renovation and the delivery 
and installation of laboratory equipment and furniture. 

We extend our appreciation to the school administration and the high 
school staff whose willingness and cooperation made our task possible and to 
the townspeople for their support in this important development. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RaZpk A. PoAinig^nQ,, Chairman 
VonaZd R. JvoA^on 
VkdUp J. BuAA, 
RoboAX. S. Coipoju, 
MaA.y2lZe,n M. [/aZzanla 

110 




SYMBOLIC RE-ENACTMENT OF BURNING OF TOWN, 
111 



JURY LIST 1976 



Olga Alberini 

Paul F. Alvarado 

William L. Anes 

John H. Armacost 

Clarence S. Armstrong, Jr, 

Barbara B. As tie 

John A. Auld 
Mary K. Barrett 

Donald Batting 
James M. Bertram 
William Boyko 
Mary D. Burks 

Donald L. Bush 
Anna Cafferelli 

Robert J. Campanella 
Christine Campbell 
John Capone 
Gretchen B. Childs 

Glen R. Clancy 
William E. Coffrin 
Phyllis P. Cohen 

Isaac M. Colbert 
Elizabeth L. Colbourn 

Julia A. Collins 

David F. Cook 
Henrietta B. Coolman 
James Richard Coolman 
John L. Coyne 
Karolyn Davey 
Nelson A. Davis 
John J. DeMartino, Jr. 
Muriel K. DePasqua 

Sedgren J. Dick 
Barbara B. Dooley 
Edward J. Dornig 
Robert Erickson 
Rolin C. Fahrenkrog 
Ann Ferguson 

Norman Fitch 
Raymond D. Florest 
Priscilla Cook Flynn 



36 Longmeadow Road 

2 Evergreen Way 
1 Cross Street 

16 Penobscot Street 

1 Flint Locke Lane 
10 Steven Lane 

25 Charlesdale Road 

3 Miller Street 

18 Longmeadow Road 
16 Belknap Road 

26 Summer Street 
39 Vinald Road 

12 Carmen Circle 

10 Grove Street 

2 Westview Road 
14 Juniper Lane 

37 Cypress Street 
9 Knollwood Road 

45 Elm Street 

71 Blacksmith Drive 

7 Country Way 

5 Rocky Lane 

18 Hartford Street 

51 High Street 

78 Adams Street 

19 Emerson Road 
19 Emerson Road 

13 Arnold Drive 

5 Bartlett Avenue 
26 Marlyn Road 
28 Lowell Mason Road 
5 Lantern Lane 

9 Bridge Street 
7 Arnold Drive 
44 Spring Street 
25 Kenney Road 
99 Granite Street 

11 Woodfall Road 

9 Fox Lane 

7 Spring Street 

16 Knollwood Road 



Waitress 

Regional Program Director 

Unemployed 

District Sales Manager 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife; 

Husband: Marketing Manager 

Fleet Service Manager 

Housewife; 

Husband: Banking Treasurer 

Radio News Announcer 

Mental Health Assistant 

Office Manager 

Housewife; 

Husband: Micro-Wave Assem. 

Asst. Department Manager 

Cashier; 

Husband: Retired 

Graduate Student 

Accounting Clerk 

District Sales Manager 

Registered Physical Ther. 

Husband: Company President 

Programmer 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife; 

Husband: Sales Engineer 

Assistant Professor 

Housewife ; 

Husband: District Sales Mgr. 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Dir. Theatre Oper. 

Carpenter 

Housewife ; 

Husband: District Sales Mgr, 

Business Office Manager 

Keypunch Operator 

Sales Engineer 

Newspaper Operator 

Housewife; 

Husband: Retired 

Mechanic 

Waitress 

Office Manager 

Cost Analyst 

Operations Vice President 

Housewife; 

Husband: Manager-Sales 

Senior Sales Engineer 

Agent 

Secretary 



112 



Kichard Goodwin, Jr. 
Walter Greenough 
Cheryl Grover 
David R. Guenette 
Richard Hall 
Vincent D. Hallowell 
John Hansen 
Patrick S. Harris 
John Henaff 
Hazel Henry- 
Michael P. Higgins 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 
Raymond G. Hollis 
Richard Holmquist 
Albert J. Houde 
Gregory S. Kurd 
Leona R. Hurd 

Grace M. lafolla 

Mildred lafolla 

Donald C. Johnson 

Colleen A. Kean 
; Michael C. Kiefer 
I Ernest Ellis Knotts 

Josetta P. Knopf 

Francis A. Logue 
' David M. Liker 
Arthur L. Lomker 
Joan R. Long 

Richard L. Lovell 

Jean C. Lynch 
I Bruce G. MacLeod 

George J. Maguire 

Bertha L. Malone 

Robert Maples 

Robert C. Marshall 

Richard Mastronardi 
I Leo J. McCabe 
: Susan G. McClure 
P Richard L. Middlesworth 
I Barbara T. Milligan 
i Barbara Monaghan 

V\ Margaret Munger 
Richard J. Murphy 
Althea Nannicelli 
William B. Nichols 
William Nightingale 
Robert T. Norton 
Janet M. 0' Toole 
Muriel C. Palumbo 



7 Pine Grove Road 
428 Main Street 

25 Frairy Street 
28 Cross Street 

3 Springvalley Road 
149 South Street 
34 Blacksmith Drive 
198 Causeway Street 

26 Winter Street 
49 Elm Street 

122 Harding Street 
106 Harding Street 

8 Pheasant Road 

67 Blacksmith Drive 
147 High Street 
21 Lee Road 
3 Westview Road 
3 Westview Road 

102 Spring Street 
34 Vinald Road 

27 Pound Street 
18 Fox Lane 

6 Curve Street 

16 Spring Valley Road 

90 Adams Street 

348 South Street 
24 Hillcrest Road 
14 Stoneybrook Road 
63 Adams Street 

82 Green Street 
76 Bridge Street 
322 Main Street 
33 Indian Hill Road 
73 Adams Street 
3 Came lot Lane 
5 Lawrence Court 
12 Green Street 

16 Lantern Lane 
67 North Street 
41 Colonial Road 
5 Noon Hill Road 
10 Juniper Lane 

1 Steven Lane 
24 Marlyn Road 

17 Kamark Drive 

4 Longmeadow Road 
55 Orchard Street 
24 Charlesdale Road 
31 Pound Street 
17 West Street 



Student Nurse 

Retired 

Assembler 

Student 

Staff Accountant 

School Custodian 

District Manager 

Consultant 

Computer System Designer 

Housewife; 

Husband: Pres. Trust Co. 

Telephone Salesman 

Driver 

Steam Fireman 

Manager 

Service Advisor 

Superintendant of Eng. 

Substitute Teacher 

Housewife; 

Husband: Broadcast Eng. 

Attendant Nurse 

Driver 

Owner-Service Station 

Bank Teller 

Sales Representative 

Manager-Accounts Records 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Owner-Spec. Shop 

Insurance Claim Superv. 

Sales /Engineering 

Computer Analyst 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Attorney 

Owner-Carpet Installation 

Receptionist 

Engineering Clerk 

CPA-Self -employed 

Clerk Typist 

Marketing Manager 

Carpenter 

Project Engineer 

Salesman 

Assembly Worker 

Manager-Owner 

Copywriter 

Housewife ; 

Husband: Director 

Artist 

Manager-Customer Service 

Secretary 

National Sales Manager 

Retail 

Pressroom Surveyor 

Secretary 

Housewife; 

Husband: Self-employed 



113 



Arthur M. Park 
William J. Pietrusiak 
Alma Richards 
Hanson C. Robbins 
Helen E. Rohnstock 

Helen Rulfs 
James A. Ryan 
Anne M. Sarno 
Jeanne Savage 

Louise A. Sears 
Joyce Smith 
Carol Strom 

Janice M. Suereth 

Robert T. Toubeau 
Linda Tuttle 
Ronald 0. Vartabedian 
Florence Vollmuth 
Sandra Wallace 
Annamae Ward 

Mary M. Welch 
Joan M. White 
Sherrel Davis-Williams 

Barbara J. Winans 
Robert B. Wot ton 
Jean T. Swaim 



23 Farm Street 
33 Cypress Street 

3 Johns Avenue 
72 Elm Street 

19 Forest Street 

4 Castle Avenue 

15 Lantern Lane 
50 Colonial Road 

9 Evergreen Way 

68 Philip Street 

Box 396 (Harding Street) 

2 Grove Street 

5 Pine Street 

52 Brook Street 

3 Hospital Road 
31 Vinald Road 
39 Marlyn Road 

91 Pleasant Street 
8 Haven Road 

115 High Street 

16 Flintlocke Lane 
72 High Street 

4 Woodfall Road 

20 Grove Street 
66 Foundry Street 



Custodian 

Owner-Vice-President 

Bbokkeeper 

Investment Banking 

Housewife; 

Husband : Warehouseman 

Receptionist 

Coordinating Marketing 

Bank Records Clerk 

Housewife; 

Husband: Sales Manager 

Office Worker 

Administrative Secretary 

Housewife; 

Husband : Teacher 

Housewife; 

Husband : Groundsman 

Utility Sander 

Junior Clerk-Typist 

U. S. Post Office 

General Office 

Licensing Clerk 

Housewife; 

Husband : Accountant 

Secretary 

Manager 

Housewife; 

Husband : Engineer 

Nurse' s Aide 

Supervisor 

Housewife; 

Husband: Insurance Broker 



114 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1976 



115 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The last year has been one of transition for Medfleld schools. 

Mr. Robert Cresto succeeded Dr. Bruce Pulsifer as Superintendent. Dr. 
Pulsifer, after 20 years in education, has chosen to try his hand at private 
business in Maine. We wish him well and thank him for his four years of 
service in Medfield. 

Mr. James Morris has retired after over twenty-two years in education. 
Jim was Assistant Superintendent with Dr. Pulsifer and completed his career 
as Acting Superintendent for Medfield 's schools helping to bridge the gap 
between Dr. Pulsifer and Mr. Cresto. We also wish Jim well as he enjoys the 
good life in Maine, and we extend to him heart-felt thanks for his many 
contributions to Medfield and its schools. 

Mr. Russell Devereau was appointed as the first Business Manager for 
Medfield 's schools. Russ distinguished himself as Principal of Memorial 
School and provides us with special talents and insights in his new position. 

We are pleased to point out that, with the help and cooperation of 
school administrators, we were able to accomplish our stated objectives of 
coming up with a 1976-77 budget which was no more than 5% over the 1975-76 
budget. Additionally, prudent management allowed the schools to return over 
$36,000 to the Town at the end of the 1975-76 school year. The School 
Committee and administration intend to continue to work diligently to 
provide sound education along with fiscal responsibility for Medfield. 

After recognizing the need to expand facilities to enable us to 
continue the demands for science courses, the Committee proposed, Town 
Meeting approved, and we additionally completed a new chemistry laboratory. 
This addition also addresses the recommendation made by the last Accredita- 
tion Team of the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
to visit Medfield. 

During the year the Committee and administration had developed the most 
comprehensive policy manual Medfield 's schools have ever had. Completed in 
collaboration with consultants of the National School Boards Association, 
the Manual promises to provide a significant tool for the more efficient 
management of our school system. 

Also worthy of note is that programs and emphasis have been discussed 
toward reducing the incidence of vandalism and its associated negative 
impact, and toward increasing student pride in our schools and its 
associated positive impact. Initial results, measured by feed-back 
regarding student attitudes and by monthly cost of vandalism reports indicate 
that we are on the right track. 

Finally, we wish to express our continuing gratitude to the many 



16 



Townspeople who support our schools with their volunteer services and to the 
Town departments whose support helps provide Medfield with a sound education 
system. 

John C. RixdUilt, J/l., ChcuAman 
ThomcUi McMu/iX^e, [/-icn- ChcuAman 

Vawn I. AiUtin, financial So-CAntoAy 
FkWip J. BuAA 




School Committee Members (standing) Philip Burr, Thomas McMurtrie, 
R. Bates, (seated) John Rudisill, Jr., and Dawn Austin. 



Barrel 



REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Members of the School Committee and the Citizens of Medfield: 

It is my privilege to submit this annual report of the educational 
activities and aspirations of the public schools for providing a curriculum 
of the highest possible calibre and at the same time mindful of the fiscal 
resources available. At this writing, I have been your Superintendent for 
two months and have begun to review curriculum needs, develop accountable 
budgetary requests for the 1977-78 school year, and with the School Committee 
address priority items which will serve to enhance the education of our 
youth. 



117 



CO 


f^ 


r-^ 


ON 


00 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 


a> 


CJN 


0^ 


CJN 


CJN 


1— 1 


■-' 


^ 


t— 1 


rH 


CO 


w 


CO 


CO 


CO 


a 


<u 


0) 


0) 


a) 


u 


^ 


)-l 


J-l 


>-i 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


cx 


D- 


d. 


CX 


O. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Q) 


(1) 


0) 


<u 


<u 


e 


E 


E 


E 


E 


u 


(-1 


Vj 


^ 


V-i 


0) 


QJ 


0) 


OJ 


0) 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 



(0 

-J 

o 
o 

X 

o 



4-1 


4-J 


>-l 


01 


u 


u 


u 


>^ 


CO 


4J 


C 


c 


cu 


<U 


(U 


cu 


cu 


u 


u 


CO 


(U 


cu 


00 


u 


oo 


cx 


o 


CD 


o 


•H 


"O 


T3 


(T3 


4-1 


CD 


cu 


•H 


4-1 


4-1 


cx 


c 


C 


c 


•H 


C 


(U 


14-1 


(U 


CD 


>^ 


0) 


QJ 


CT3 


g 


CD 


^ 


U-l 


V4 


c: 


H 


4-1 


4-1 


X 


g 


S 


^ 


O 


o 


•H 




c 


c 




O 




o 




CU 


TD 


^ 


•H 


•H 


CO 


u 


CO 


o 


1— t 


CO 


^ 


S-I 


»-i 


U 


CO 




CO 


PQ 


rH 




O 


QJ 


(U 


(V 


0) 


1— ( 


cu 




o 




o 


i-H 


a 


a 


c 


o 


c 




>-l 




CJ> 


CLJ 


3 


d 


•H 


o 


•H 




>^ 








CO 


CO 


CO 


j:: 


CO 




CD 




o 








3 


o 


3 




PL, 




4-) 






4-) 


PQ 


CO 


m 




^ 










c 










U 




>^ 






03 




T3 


o 




CU 




>-l 






4-1 




c 


4J 




cx 




CD 






CO 




CO 






cu 




4-1 






•H 






>. 




cu 




CU 






CO 




■U 


u 




^ 




u 






CO 




c 


CD 




^ 




o 






< 




<U 
T3 
C 
CU 
4-1 

c 

•H 
^4 
CU 

cx 

3 


4-t 

<u 
}-l 
o 

cu 
CO 




o 

o 

03 




cu 

CO 





UJ 
UJ 



O 
O 

_j 

o 
o 

X 

o 

CO 



S-I 5-1 


LU 


CD CO 

4J 4-1 


a 


irman 
g Secre 
1 Secre 


z 

UJ 


C CO C CO 
to ^ -H -H 


z 


E U TD O 


■^^ 


s-i 1 >-. c: 

•H cu O CO 


GC 


CD O O C 

x: -H cu -H 


LU 


CJ> > P^ fe 


Q. 



(0 



-) 






CO 
U 


#. 






•z. 




CO 




^^ 


u 










£ 


Qi^ 


• • 


c 


o 




M •-) 


J= 


X 


1— 1 




o 


H 


CU 


C CX 
3 'H 






s-< 




»■ 


l-l 


CD i-H 


r. 


Q> 


CD 


Q -H 


f— 1 


•H 


cn 


s: 


1— 1 


U 




•> Pu 


•H 


4J 


•> 


c: 


CO 


>-l 


(0 


•H - 


•H 


3 


CU 


■U M 


T3 


S 




CO >-i 


3 


o 


CD 


3 3 


ffJ 


s 


P3 


< CQ 



o 




UJ 


CO 


o 


O T) 


^IBB 


w 


U. 


"5 ^ 


u. 


CJ 


O 






T3 . • 




M S PQ 




S " cQ 



^ fQ 


;^ 










PQ < 


< 








CJ) 


< - 


-H 












.-1 


d hJ 


• 




Q - 


- K 


CU 




"Z ' 


• 


• 


4-1 


CO 


CD jr 


a 


< 


4-1 ffi 


S-I CO 


CO 


•H 4-J 


>> 




CU 


cu (U 


3 


c: 3 


Sh CD 


cu 


C CD 


^ E 


pc5 


•H pc: 


CD E 


•H 


CO X. 


O CD 




00 


S --H 


f— 1 


>-) CO 


oi •-) 


•N 


S-I ». 


CU 


•H 


5-1 




3 


•H >» 


•> CO 


E 


»> CD 


>> rv 


CO 


> ^ 


cu 


W 


CD 2 


O CO 


CU 


4-1 


3 - 




rH 


+J -H 


S-I 


•> S-I 


S-I S-I 


»• 


3 •- 


CO S-I 


cu 


S-I CD 


00 S-I 


00 


C 5-1 


cu S-I 


> 


U O 


3 CU 


c 


C -H 


S-I o 


(U 


CU o 


x; o 


•H 


CD 0) 


O 2 


o 


fc«i 2 


CO O 


t^ 


? = 



118 



c 
^ e 

•H C 
T> O 

(u a 



O c^ 
a^ ON 



^<rOLn<raN<toooNv£)mor~.<raNOoocx5^rnt-i^oro<r 

(J^O^O^O^(J^O^O^O^O^O^CT^<J^O^O^CT^O^O^O^(J^O^O^O^O^O^O^ 



o 
o 

X 

o 
</) 

X 

g 

X 
(£ 

o 

z 

LU 
(A 















CO 
































s 












w 
















s 








. 




































s 






















. 


W 
























s 




























>1 






H 


hJ 
























<s 












>^ 
















4-1 






























X) 










H 




4-1 
















•H 


• 




CO 


< 






• 
















w 


> 












•H 
















CO 


<: 












T3 


















•H 








< 




CO 
















5-1 






s 


s 






W 
















S 


c 












5-1 
















CU 


s 












• 


















pi 








S* 




CU 






• 










> 






»> 


»> 






S 














o 


r, 














> 






T3 


• 








•H 


•> 




• 


• 




















•H 


CU 


^ 








•^ 




•H 






W 












CO* 




x 


> 

•H 






c 














CO 


4-1 

CO 


5-1 
O 


•H 






(U 
00 




d 

13 






s 


X 








c 


CO 

CO 




;z 








5-4 
(U 














2 


4-1 
CO 


>4 


CO 

3 






CU 
rH 




d 


< 




•> 










o 


S 




U-l 








4-1 














PQ 




[3 


S 






rH 




o 






g 


•s 








4J 






o 


c 






CO 






< 




• 


• 




e 


CU 








o 






• pa 




s 


cu 








CO 


> 






CO 






CO 


• 


• 






-D 


T3 


»> 


CO 


z 


S 






u 




CO 


Td 




^ 


■p 








o 


•H 




• 


>> 






(U 


< 


<: 


pa 




W 


W 


a 


-C 














o 


w •> 




00 


CO 








pa 


C 




> 


<u 






x; 










• 


• 


•H 


00 


»> 


»> 






d 




PQ 


. OJ 




c 


u 










:d 




•H 


I— 1 






4J 


s 


s 


». 




S 


s 


CO 


c 


• 


o 






o 






S i^ 




•H 


w 








• 






c 


CO 






5-4 






f^ 








3 


•H 


<: 


•H 






4-1 




•> 


•H 




E 










T3 


f 




C3 


0) 






O 


>^ 


•V 






»- 


•> 


S 


E 




CO 






CO 




• 


- x 




CO 


C 








W 


• 






12 


• 


• 


^: 


• 


• 


•H 




• 


• 




CO 


pa 


3 






o 




Td 


• CO 




U 


o 










pa 




» 




< 


C/2 




PQ 


< 


CO 




CO 


CO 


«4-l 


5-4 




s 






pa 


• 


w 


CO a 




P^ 


4-1 








S 






• 


rv 






»> 


• 




5-1 








O 


fi4 


•• 










CO 




• E 






m 










<C 




CO 


• 


pa 


pa 


• 


<: 


PQ 


Q) 




pa 


pa 






CU 


pa 






^^ 




CO 


pa CO 




>s 


o 








•s 








CO 






CO 






> 








>. 


•> 


00 




• 




• 


pa 




pd 






pa 








• 


X 




pa 




»> 


r> 




». 


»> 


•H 




•N 


»> 


5-1 


• 


(U 


•> 


CO 




<: 




pa 






C/0 










<: 


QJ 






pa 


(U 


<u 


pa 


(U 


>^ 


c 


• 


0) 


<u 


O 


CO 


I— 1 


>. 




• 




r. 




>^ 5 






«v 










00 




»> 




4-1 


4-1 




00 


4-1 


^ 


CO 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 




>H 


4J 


PQ 


CO 


pa 


CU 


»> 


4-1 0) 




PQ 


• 








CQ 


OJ 


• 


dj 


». 


CO 


CO 


#v 


(U 


•H 






CO 


CO 


CO 


PQ 


o 


•H 








4-1 


CU 


•H 2 






<; 










rH 


pa 


4-1 


CU 


4-1 


4-1 


OJ 


I— 1 


CO 


0) 


PQ 


4-1 


4-1 


> 




u 


CO 


•V 


CQ 


•V 


CO 


4J 


CO 




•s 










^ 


.— 1 




CO 


00 CO 


cn 


oo 


rH 


5-1 


4-1 




CO 


CO 


5-1 


r> 




5-1 


CU 




CU 


4-1 


CO 


^-1 4-4 




c 


pa 








c 


o 


J 


4J 


<v 






OJ 


o 


0) 


CO 


•V 






(V 


c 


Td 


(U 


00 


•s 


00 CO 


+J 


OJ o 




>-^ 










5-1 


CJ 




CO 


t— 1 


u 


5-1 


T— 1 


o 


> 


4-1 


'Td 


5-1 


5-1 


CO 


5-1 


d 


> 


0) 


CU 


CU 




CO 


> 




(U 


<s 








(U 




hJ 




I— 1 


CU 


CU 


rH 




•H 


cn 


I— 1 


OJ 


(U 


c 


CU 


CO 


•H 


I— 1 


4-1 


r-{ 


e 




•H >> 


c 


^ 


I— 1 








4-1 


riii 




5-4 


o 


4-1 


4-1 


o 


>. 


c 




<u 


4-1 


4-1 


o 


4-1 


i-H 


d 


rH 


CO 


iH 


CO 


00 


d -1-1 


o 


CO 


t— 1 








CO 


O 


r. 


(U 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CU 


D 


c 


•H 


CO 


CO 


CJ 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


4J 


o 


x: 


u 


13 -H 


•H 


CO 


•H 








CO 


CO 


^ 


4-1 




5 


^ 




1—1 




CO 


U-l 


^ 


:5 




CO 


M 




CJ 


CO 


CJ 


00 


3 


CO 


•U 


0) 


j:: 








<u 


e 


1—1 


CO 


c 


<v 


(U 


c 


CO 


5^ 


00 


00 


Q) 


0) 


c 


(U 




d 








d 


XI 


d 5-1 


CO 


x; 


0) 








x; 


•H 


o 


0) 


o 


oo 


00 


o 


0) 


O 


•H 


c 


OO 


00 


o 


X 


CU 


o 


CO 


g 


CO 


•H 


x 


O 0) 


O 


4-1 


c 








4-1 


5-1 


M-l 


o 


4-1 


-o 


^3 


4-1 


1—1 


I— 1 


X 


•H 


Id 


Xl 


4J 


4-1 


TJ 


4-1 


4-1 


QJ 


•H 


e 


CJ 


4-1 > 


3 


!-i 


o 








5-1 


5-1 


U-< 


5-- 


CO 


•H 


•H 


CO 


1—1 


>% 


a 


U 


•H 


•H 


CO 


u 


O 


CO 


U-4 


iH 


00 


CO 


4-1 


CO -H 


TJ 


O 


4-1 








o 


0) 


3 


O 


o 


5-1 


5-1 


o 


<u 


CO 


•H 


d. 


}-i 


J-i 


o 


o 


X 


o 


3 


CO 


o; 


5-1 


•H 


o d 


W 


2 


CO 

CO 

a 

•H 








z 


(-1 
O 
O 


C/0 

CO 
4J 
5-1 

< 


5-1 
O 


pa 

T3 
5-1 
O 
O 

o 


pa 
CO 


pa 


pa 


;3 


pa 


CO 


CO 

t3 
O 


PQ 
CO 

tu 

•H 


CO 


pa 


z 


Pi; 


PQ 

X3 


H 

Td 


CO 


Pi 


CO 
O 
•H 

e 


CO 
4-1 
5^ 

< 


pa p 
>^ 

5-4 
4-J 

CO CO 
CU -H 
•H g 
Td OJ 






O 










U 


I— 1 


O 


4-1 


a 




5-1 






4-1 


O 


3 


o 








5-1 


w 






o 


iH 


3 X 




I— 1 


C 


>^ 


>, 


>, 






CO 


O 


CO 


•H 




o 


>> 




4-1 


CJ 


4J 


•H 








O 








d 


CO 


•M CJ 


c 


CO 


•H 


5-1 


5-1 


^-1 




T3 


•H 




CO 


4-1 




o 


5-1 




CO 




CO 


4-1 








O 


rH 


CO 




o 


•H 


CO \ 


o 


a 


!-i 


CO 


CO 


CO 


x; 


D 


5-1 


QJ 


< 


CO 


<u 


u 


4J 


x 


V4 


TD 




CO 




x 




CJ 


CO 


CO 


jz 


o 


5-1 


>% 


•H 


•H 


Ph 


4J 


4J 


4-) 


CO 


4J 


4-1 


CJ 






a 




CO 


CO 


u 


W 


p-H 


e 




CO 


jd 




O 


0) 


CO 


w 


4-1 


r-l 00 


4J 


CJ 




CU 


(U 


01 


•H 


CO 


CO 


c 


• 


<U 


c 


• 


•H 


•H 






CO 


(U 


o 


•H 


o 


o 


•H 


d 


•H 




CO 


CO O 


•H 


c 


4J 


u 


S-i 


5-1 


r— 1 




3 


QJ 


x: 


X 


(U 


X 


g 


I— 1 


CO 


CO 


•H 


x: 


•H 


I— 1 


c 


•H 


CO 


•H 


rH 


CU 


3 


•H iH 


cn 


•H 


CO 


o 


o 


O 


00 


o 


T3 


•H 


4-1 


4J 


•H 


4-1 


OJ 


00 


4-1 


>^ 


O 


4J 


CO 


OO 


(U 


CO 


>. 


CO 


00 


e 


TD 


CJ O 


o 


5-1 


CO 


Q) 


OJ 


CJ 


c 


o 


C 


CJ 


CO 


CO 


O 


CO 


X 


C 


5-4 


x 


O 


CO 


3 


c 


5-1 


3 


X 


3 


d 


o 


d 


O -H 


Ph 


PLI 


< 


W 


C/2 


CO 


w 


0^ 


M 


C/D 


S 


s 


CO 


s 


CJ 


W 


<: 


Ah 


CO 


S 


s 


w 


p^ 


s 


Ph 


pa 


w 


ffi 


M 


CO pa 







5-1 


, 














4-1 


. 


























. 


*-) 


O 










. 




CU 


s 








. . 


. 






, 


. 








PM 




CO 








• S 


•-) 




X 

CO • 


CO 




. 




:s ph 


fe 


, 




CO 


w 








CO 


• 


rH 






• 


s 


OJ . . 


. 


N pa 


0) 




< 




CO CO 


CU 


Q 


. 


u 


CU 


, 


. . 




O 


f^ 


iH 


• 




fe 


TJ 


oo CJ <; 


u 


•H 


o 


. 






CO CU 


5-1 




w 


CU 


d 


W 


W W 




CO 




•H 


CO 


• 




CO 5-1 


i-t 


•-3 


iH Q) 


d 


w 


Xl 


< 


iH iH 


•H 


4-1 




d 


d 








CO 


d 


CJ 




CO fc 


CO 


•H CO 


o d CO 




w d 


CO 




iH 




00 5^ 


CO 


5-1 


>. • 


CO 


CO 


CO 


d X 




CO 


x 


CO 


x: 




OJ 


CJ S 


CU CO d 


f. 


3 


5-1 


TJ 


CO 


d 


3 CO 


rH 


0) 


o w 


•-) 


CO 


tu 


X J-i 




H 


o 


•H 


4J 


5^ d 


E 


d T3 


CJ CO d 


d 


>. '-d 


f^ 


•H 


d 


X 


O X 


U 


X 


d 




3 


E 


O -H 






i-d 


5-1 


3 


O CU 


CO 


CO W 


3 o 


X 


5-1 




> 


o 


o 


Q CJ 




O 


CO CU 


r. 


CO 


CO 


>-> Td 




». 




PL, 


Pi 


z .-1 


•-:) 


5-1 


»> CO Q 


o 


CO - 


r. 


CO 


Q 


•-d 




rv 


pti 


S d 


4J 




i-d 


3 




CO 


•V 






rH 




Cr, . 


d 


^ 


S CO 


5-1 


Q 






r. >^ 


CU 




CO 


4-J 


«s 




^ K^ 




<u 


X 


r. 


r. 


-< 


»> 


>. 


CO •> »■ 




o 


CU 




^ 


•^ 


>^rH 


4-1 


^^. 


^ 1-^ 


O 


CO 


<^ 


CO 




Td 


4-1 


CU 


CO 


>> 


d 


-^ 


X >> CU 


•^ 


- E 


X 


•\ 


Td 


•Td 


CU iH 


4J 


CU 


>. 




QJ 


CO 


r-i «> 




(U 


CO 


r^ 


5-4 


.H •> 


o 


>^ CO 


CO CU O 


o 


CU o 


CJ 


CO 


5-1 


5-1 


5-1 CO 


CU 


0) 


OJ .s 


5-1 


iH 


•H 


O (U 


CU 


rH 


5-1 


5-1 


CU 


CU 5-1 


4-1 


X CU 


rH d CO 


a 


CO d 


4-1 


X 


CO 


CO 


<4-l T3 


d 


CO 


rH Td 


(U 


^ 


5-( 


X --H 


s 


iH 


CJ 


CO 


a^ CU 


5-1 


X rH 


iH l-i iH 


o 


[5 o 


(U 


X 


5-1 


5-4 


Td o 


0) 


5-1 


M 5-1 


Q 


a 


J-i 


a X 


CO 


•H 


CJ 


iH 


CO 


CO N 


CO 


•H O 


CO CO O 


3 


o u 


rH 


•H 


•H 


•H 


o o 


3 


(U 


CU o 


a 


•H 


O 


•H o 


2 


1^ 


S 


U 




^ < 


pa 


pa pa 


CJ CJ a 


U 


Q w 


fe 
^ 


CJ 


O 


CJ 


CJ O 


CJ 


ffi 


i^ hJ 


S 


X 


s 


2 2 



119 



lo ro \C -<T 



vDogr^\£)Oa>mmrH^mcNcx) 

Q^O^0^0^CT^O^0^O^CT^0^C7^O^O^ 



r-- <Ti CsJ o^ <r 
^ ^ r^ vo r^ 
0^ ON On CTn CTn 













< 






•^ 






Pu 
















































2 






> 

•H 






5-1 

CU 
















































•V 






C 






4.) 
















































>. 






3 






CO 














































• 


4-1 












OJ 






















XI 
























-o 


•H 






CU 






X 


• 




















w 
























w 


Cfl 






CO 

3 




< 


o 
o 


< 














XJ 






s 
























s 


0) 






a 






p^ 


S 












XI 


w 


























H 






> 

•H 






CO 

^-1 




s 


1+-I 














W 


s 




XI 


" 






<C 














< 




c 
^-1 


13 




< 


CO 




c 


o 


>^ 












S 






S 


> 

•H 




















S 




01 

4-1 


CO 




S 


^ 


CO 


i-1 

CU 


>^ 


•H 
CO 












CO 


CU 

4-1 












^ 








, 






•» 




m 


C 




•> 






4-) 


•H 


5-1 












4-J 


CO 




e" 








• 








< 






OJ 


en 


CO 


CO 






en 


s 


CO 


CO 


0) 




• 








4-1 


4-1 




CO 


c 






< 














i-H 


• 


0) 


•H 




w 






CO 


5-1 


> 




< 








d 


CO 




x 


o 














CQ 






a 


CQ 


j= 


X) 




CO 


CQ 


». 


CU 


(U 


•H 












H 






00 


4-1 






PQ 














>- 




4-1 


c 




CO 




(U 


^ 


> 


c 




S 










c 




c 


CO 














•^ 








r. 


5-1 


M 




S 


•\ 


e 


■u 


•H 


:i) 












>^ 


o 




■H 


o 






r. 








4J 






" 


•H 


O 


^ 




HD 




CO 
Q 


5-1 

o 


:i3 


c 




•^ 






. 


< 


4-1 
CO 




e 

CO 


CO 






CU 
00 








3 

o 




, 


< 


C 




< 






o 


tu 


•z 




o 

4-1 


. 


CQ 




< 


PQ 


CQ 


o 

CQ 


-J 


5-1 


^ 






0) 








•H 
4-1 




CO 


PQ 


o 








. 




S-i 


r. 




CO 


CO 


< 




cq' 


< 








en 






, — 1 




en 




O 


. 


• 




14-1 


en 


P3 




ea 


5 


4-J 




CO 


o 


. 










r. 


«v 


O 


r. 








o 




. 




0> 


X) 


P3 


•V 


•H 










OJ 


o 


< 




CQ 


CQ 


«N 




r. 


^ 


X 


. 




CQ 






CJ 


. 


CQ 




c 


w 




(U 


-H 


CQ 


•^ 




< 


2: 


z 




fQ 






0) 




CU 


>^ 


CO 


en 


en 










en 




• 


c 


• 


•> 


60 


« 




OJ 










PQ 




f 


•^ 


oc 




4-J 


4-1 


■U 


• 


o 




<^ 






00 


• 


»^ 


CO 


o 


PQ 


cu 


0) 


o 


»> 


00 




»- 


U-l 


». 




ry 


• 


CU 


tu 




CO 


•H 


P 


PQ 


CQ 


OJ 






5-1 


PQ 


CU 




o 




GO.-I 




0) 


Q) 




0) 


o 




•< 


01 


< 


4-1 


I-H 




4-1 


CO 






X 




4-1 






CU 




oo CQ 




r. 


(U 


i-H 


U-J 


GO r-H 




00 




m 


CU 


00 




CO 


I-H 


CO 


CO 


5-1 


4-1 


fS 


r, 


CO 






x 


»- 


OJ 




C4H 


0) 


I— 1 


o 


O 


0) 


T-i 




Q) 


CU 


• 


oo 


0) 


CQ 


4-1 


O 






q; 


o 


c 


o 


a 


4-1 






CO 


C 


I-H 


«v 


o 


■u 


r-H 


u 




I— 1 


O 




rH 


00 <: 


CU 


I-H 




CO 


o 


CQ* 


5-4 


> 




5-1 


5-1 


en 






X) 


!-i 


I-H 


c 




n3 


O 




>, rH 


U 




I-^ 


CU 




I-H 


I-H 


r. 








CU 


•H 


>^ 


OJ 


01 








3 


01 


O 


5-1 


>N 


•u 


o 


>^ 


•u 


O 






o 


r-H 


•> 


I-H 


O 


CU 


00 ^ 


r< 


4-1 


c 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


oo 






o 


+J 


U 


CU 


4-J 


C/D 




(U 


•H 


u 


CO 




CJ 


I-H 


I-H 


O 


CJ 


U-l 


5-1 


+J 


X. 


CO 


p 


•H 


CO 


CO 


S-I 






5-1 


CO 






•H 




"O 


I-H 


W 




4-1 






O 


CU 


CJ 




4-1 


d 


3 


4-J 


^ 




CO 


CO 


I 


CO 









4-1 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C 


}-l 


M 


)-i 


4-1 


4-1 




c 


O 


d 




C 


•H 


XI 


O 


CU 


OJ 


c 


5-1 


0) 


CU 


X 






en 


13 


C 


CO 


5-1 


o 


o 


<U 


01 


c 


QJ 




o 




c 


CO 


O 


r-H 


rC 


e 


V4 


00 


o 


OJ 


X 


x 


x 








X: 


O 


CU 


CU 


4-» 


o 


rH 


> 


CO 


•H 




4-1 


>. 


CO 


CU 


4-1 


o 


u 




CO 


X) 


4J 


> 


4-1 


CD 


4-1 


o 






4-1 


4-1 


g 


X 


> 


m 


c 


>—) 


•H 


>. 


>-i 




CO 


4-1 


E 


4-1 


CO 


XJ 


4-1 


V-i 


N 


•H 


CO 


•H 


!-4 


5-1 


4-1 






CO 


5-< 


e 


4_J 


•H 


o 


o 


QJ 


c 


i-i 


CO 




o 


•H 


£ 


CO 


O 


CO 


•H 


CO 


CO 


S-i 


o 


c 


O 


^^m 


O 


•H 






CO 


O 


•H 


5-1 


C 


CQ 


u 


12 


:=) 


CQ 


S 




P3 


u 


W 


CQ 
•X3 


X) 


Pd 


PH 


Q 


z 


CQ 


CQ 


D 


Z 


X 


Z 


P^ 






x5 


2 


en 


o 
is 

c 


P 
















o 






U 


H 












XI 














u 






O 












-a 






4J 






O 


o 




• 








CO 






o 










o 






•H 












a 






CO 






o 


o 




O 








0) 














o 






4-1 








W 


03 


01 




w 


c 






u 


CJ 




CU 


• 






p:: 








I-H 






CJ 






CO 








o; 


O 


:x 




QJ 


•H 












I-H 


X) 












z 




CO 












o 








•H 


•H 






•H 


nd 






4-1 


4-1 




w 


5-1 






4-1 








P- 






4-J 






3 




w 




T3 


E 


4-1 




T3 


u 




CO 


CO 


CO 




~-^ 


O 






en. 








•H 






CO 




CO 


XI 




o 




3 


O 


cx 




D 


o 




CJ 


CO 


CO 






O 






01 






^ 




O 






CO 




o 


W 




•H 




•u 


d 


cu 




■U 


o 


>. 


•H 


< 


< 




IS 


a 






Q 






i-H 


C 


>^ 


>^ <C 




■H 






•u 




C/2 


o 


Q 




CO 


o 


>-( 


4-1 








CO 




CO 




» 




CO 


-> 


CO 


•H 


5-1 


5-1 






4-1 


I-H 




CO 






a 




x: 






4-1 


CO 


x; 


(U 


rC 


5-1 


x: 


CO 


X 


X 


CO 


CO 


p. 


5-1 


CO 


CO 


(U 


X 


CO 


CO 


CU 


s 




.—I 


w 


X) 


CO 


iH 


4-1 


CO 


E 


CO 


a 


CO 


Q 


CO 


CU 


CO 


CO 


o 


CU 




•H 


PM 


4-J 


4-1 


o 


CO 


e 


O 


a 


0) 




f3 




u 


•H 


CO 


CO 


•H 


CU 


•H 


C 


•H 


. 


•H 


c 


•H 


•H 


•H 


c 




O 




01 


CU 


a 


•H 


CU 


•H 


a 








0; 




c 


•H 


•H 


E 


x; 


I-H 


0) 


I-H 


x; 




•H 


I-H 


C 


CO 


•H 




C 


4-1 


5-1 


5-1 


CU 


r-H 


X 


CO 


CU 


-—1 


-^ 


O 


£ 


en 


CO 


O 


CO 


0) 


4-1 


00 


•H 


00 


a 


00 


CO 


00 


CO 


>^ 


CO 




•H 


CO 


o 


O 


•H 


00 


4-1 


>^ 


•H 


r;; 


'(-. 


Q 


O 


D 


cx 


o 


CO 


x^ 


CO 


c 


CJ 


C 


CU 


c 


d 


C 


CX X 


3 




5-1 


CO 


CU 


CU 


o 


c 


CO 


X 


o 


ZI 


< 


cc 


::: 


ca 


CD 


CO 


< 


o 


:s 


w 


tn 


w 


2 


w 


CQ 


W 


CO 


Ph 


PQ 




P-i 


<: 


en 


en 


en 


W 


s 


Ph 


en 



>. 






»— ; 








4J 


• en CU . c CO CO 












i-l 


•— ^ 




• H 


-< • rH ^ CU 'H 'H 




Zj i-H 


• 




X 


;- 




CO 


J-i 


OJ ►-) 1-1 (U > .H 


E 


O -H 


U- 


• 


o 


o 


X3 


•H 


0) . 


CO rH CO >^ rH rH 3 


•H 


J-i CO 




^ 




-C 


^ 


5-4 


3 X 


CUrHrHX ox >.'-3 


CO 


o o 


c 




ri 




r; 


5-1 


00 


E (U 3 O 3 4-) en 


r-H 


Q 


CO 


73 


>— ; 


c2 


c. 


r. 


5-1 <U 


(0 4-" CO kJ CO 


I-H 




CO 


> 






;_i 


^ 


CO (U 


•-> CO (X, - :^ •> c 


•rH 


». ^ 


3 


CiJ 


r 


•- 


O 




S hJ 


w c - (u o 


:s 


r-H ^ 


en 




^ 


Q 


CQ 


«> 




" .- CO I-I " 4J 4-1 




.— 1 f-H 




•> 


u 


5-1 




c 


» «> 


rH »^>a)4-lC5-l 


^ 


V -H 


•> 


CO 


•H 


o 


•> 


o 


0) x 


3>-Hp.H.-H(UC03 


00 


5 (U 


Q> 


-u 


c 


4-1 


CO 


CO 


C 4-» 


OX J-Ji-H C Ci-HX 


c 


V- Q 


00 


4-1 


c 


C 


OJ 


E 


>: -H 


5-4COcOi-HCOrH5-i 


3 


r^ _ 




r, 


o 








-t E 


CX4-I4-I3C0XCUC0 


o 


z c 


C~. 


P- 


c^ 


vv 


v: 


CO 


CO en 


^j u-j Wj 'Si ^ \r^ ":> ':i. 


w 



CO 




. 


<; 


. 




CO 


CU 


CO 


en 




hJ 


CU 


O -P M 


E 


CO 




>. 




c 


5h O 


CO 


I-H 


CO 


rH 


4-1 


CO 


CO CU X 


^ 


00 


•rH 


5-1 


5-1 


•H 


C X (U 




3 


5-1 


0) 


0) 


Q 


C O Q 


.^ 


o 


O 


> 


X 




O Pi 


.-H 


Q 


Q 


CU 


o 


»^ 


Q 


r-H 






PQ 


Pi 


c 


»- iH 


CU 




»^ 






o 


»- 4-1 rH 


C 


CJ 


01 


•^ 


^ 


CO 


T3 a OJ 


c 




4-1 


X 


c 


5-1 


O O X 


o 


#> 


CO 


00 


o 


CU 


o e o 


CJ 


QJ 


o 


•H 




XI 


:2 ^ 5h 




X3 


5-1 


CO 


H 


C 


4-1 OJ -H 


o 


M 


Q 


p:: 


-5 


< 


< CQ PQ 



120 



v£>o~)vr><ro^I^o^ooa^rovDLnlnvo^o^o^I— lOi— loooooLocNii— lvo^DcN<J■vDa^oo 

O^O^0^CT>0^O^0^0^O^O^a^C3^O^0^O^0^O^0^0^O^0^0^0^0^0^O^O^O^O^O^0^C3^(J^0^0^0^ 









s 






























CO 

< 








































a 







































































•H 
CO 






























" 








































D 






























> 








































S 






























•H 
















CO 
























S 


















na 












c 










> 

•H 






S 












<* 












«< 


















w 























Q 




• 


























>^ 




















• 










4-1 












CO 


X 


»< 










CO 


S 












v-i 


















;s 


<; 










CO 










s 


• 


w 


4-1 
























o 




























• 















X 


• 


3 










s 


»> 












4-1 


















•N 


s 








X 


PQ 










«N 




s 















• 






^3 






CO 


















QJ 










M 












c 


r^ 




•H 










». 


> 






c 






> 


















4J 


r. 










r^ 













0) 


»> 


4-1 











S 


•H 






03 






S-i 


















CO 


X 








S 


• 










4J 


4-1 


QJ 











•H 




C 






-H 






QJ 


















4-1 


•H 










X 










5 


CO 


00 


QJ 








CO 


oa 


P 






W 






CO 


















CO 


5-1 








•\ 


w 










QJ 


4-1 


QJ 


c 








3 










M 






o 


















c 


X 
CO 










s 










2: 


CO 


r-i 


c 









S 


<: 


3 







CU 






u 














• 




o 


X 






• 


CO 












5-1 


c 





CJ 








PQ 


CO 


4-1 






T3 




















CO 




4J 








< 


4-J 


«~ 










QJ 





CJ 




• 








CO 


CO 






O 






c 


















CD 


14-4 








CO 


QJ 










> 


4-1 




rH 


<: 






»> 


X 









^ 






o 














X 




O 





X 




S 




4-1 













CO 


5-1 


CO 




• 




CJ 


QJ 


PQ 






Cii 






4-J 
CO 


















PQ 


>^ 


w 


< 







CO 

u 






CO 




X 

c 



PQ 


QJ 
•H 


5-4 
4-1 


PQ 


< 




•H 

CO 


H 


^ 






^-^ 






o 




. 




. 


. 


• 


e 




•V 


4-1 


CO 




CO 


4-1 


CO 




• 






< 




> 


C 


r. 


1^4 




3 


r. 


• 






o 






m 




< 

PQ 




XI 


XI 

w 


CO 

PQ 


CO 
00 




< 


•H 

CO 

5-1 


PQ* 


X 


CO 

CO 


CO 

PQ 


c 





X 


PQ 






CO 


•H 
Pi 


QJ 



4-1 

•H 


PQ 




4-( 


CO* 


< 
PQ 






> 


. 




. 








S 


s 




c 




PQ* 


QJ 


r> 


. 






4-1 


• 


S* 


4-1 




< 




r. 


^ 


CO 


•^ 







PQ 








•H 


<: 


. 


XI 




>, 








rv 


•H 






> 


4-t 


PQ 


pi 


«^ 


CO 


CO 




C 




• 


PQ 




• 


5-1 


4-1 








r. 




• 


c 




CO 


w 








rv 


r. 


QJ 


£ 




«^ 


•H 


5-1 






• 







•s 







PQ 




<* 


CO 


QJ 


^4 


• 


>. 


r. 







< 


P 


PQ 








CO 






. 


C 


CO 




QJ 


C 


< 


<* 


•^ 


PQ 


PQ 


PQ* 


• 


£ 






r. 






> 


<: 


X 


5-1 


>^rH 










PQ 


CO 


< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•H 


^-1 




00:3 






• 


• 






CO 


5-1 




»• 


>^ PQ 


PQ 


•H 




W 





E 


CO 




PQ* 


•V 


r, 




a 




CO 


. 






CO 


fc 


<c 


Q) 




•4-1 


r^ 


< 


<C 


>^ 


•N 


. 


QJ 


• 


4-1 


4-1 






C 


M-l 


• 


4-1 


QJ 


u-i 


• 




0) 


0) 


r. 


s 


PQ 


S 


PQ 


PQ 


PQ* 


S 






.-f 


>^ 





QJ 






• 


QJ 


PQ 


> 


CO 


C 


•H 


•X 


r, 


P 





CO 


CO 


X 


U-l 


< 


«^ 


■P 


4-1 


QJ 
















#. 


PQ 


rH 






4-1 


PQ 


•^ 


PQ 


4-1 






• 




CO 


Q) 


• 






• 


> 


CO 


3 




QJ 


CO 


CO 


bO PQ 


r. 


<4-< 


•^ 


r. 


•^ 


M-l 









H 


QJ 


CO 




CO 




CO 


r. 


M-l 


PQ 


i < 


u 


00 


CO 


QJ 


QJ 


PQ 


5-1 





PQ 


PQ* 


00 


•t-i 


+J 


CU 


• 


QJ 


O 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


O 


CO 


r. 


U 




00 


4-1 


»> 


— 


< 


4J 


c 







5-1 • 


QJ 


QJ 


CO 


4-1 


00 




QJ 


< 






QJ 


W 


C/2 


T-{ 


> 


4-i 




4-1 


4-1 


4-1 






^ 




PQ 


QJ 


CO 


U 


rH 




CO 


5-1 




•N 


QJ PQ 


> 


rH 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


»^ 


CO 




4-1 


•> 


rH 






rH 


•H 


CO 


>^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ PQ 


QJ 


c 




t-H 




QJ 


QJ 


•> 




QJ 


>^ 


e 


> 


•H 


,—\ 


S 


4-1 


,-i 


B 


c 


rH 


CO 


B 


rH 


00 


^ 


O 


c 


4-1 


4-) 


4J 


4-1 


4J 


4-1 




4-1 





». 


rH 


5-1 


4-1 


CO 


M 


00 


4-1 


4-1 


CO 




C 







CO 


r-{ 


CO 





CO 




CO 





$-( 


0) 


u 


j:3 


CO 


•H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•H 


•^ 


CO 


4-1 


rH 





•H 


CO 


^ 





u 


CO 


•H 


^ 


M-l rH 


P 


CJ 


M-l 







x: 


CJ 


> 




^ 


u 


3 


4-1 








CO 








CO 


r-\ 


!3 


00 


Q) 


u 


CO 


:s 





CO 


d 


CO 


CO 


00 


QJ 









CO 


CJ 


00 




CO 


H 


00 




rQ 


w 


4-1 


C 


c 


}-l 


C 


C 


C 


U 


tH 


QJ 


c 


3 




rH 


QJ 


•H 


e 


rT^ 


QJ 


5-4 


c 


3 


C 


c 




X 




c 


c 


2 




c 


c 


^ 


QJ 


c 


o 


o 


QJ 


o 


O 


o 


QJ 


QJ 


00 


•H 


C 


QJ 





OOS 


•H 


^ 


X 


QJ 


•H 


• C 








• 


•H 


• 


•H 







p 


•H 





O 


O 


CO 


4-1 


4-1 


> 


4-1 


4-) 


4-1 


> 


C 


XI 


5-1 


CO 


5-1 


4J 


X 




!-i 





4-1 


> 


e 


> CO 


4-1 


4-1 


> 


!-4 


CO 


B 


4-1 






e 


4J 


4J 


}-4 


>^ 


CO 


CO 


•H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•H 


5-1 


•H 


5-t 







C 


•H 


• 


5-( 


4-1 


5-1 


•H 


CO 


•'-' 6 


CO 


CO 


•H 





CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IS 


CO 


CO 


•H 


o 


5-1 


o 


o 


a 


o 


O 


o 


C 


O 


5-1 


CO 


g 








5-1 


4J 


QJ 


•H 





C 


5-1 


c S 








C 


<-i 


CO 


5-4 









5-1 





PL^ 


^2 


PQ 


PQ 


PQ 


Ha 


PQ 


PQ 


PQ 


!I3 

XI 
5-1 
O 


U 


PQ 


PQ 




s 


s 


PQ 


CO 


S 


Ph 


z 


P 


PH 


p w 


PQ 
X 

5-4 





PQ 


P 


U-i 


S 


f^ 


PQ 


p 


CO 


Ph 


PQ 


cn 


















O 




















CO 










U 






















4-t 










CO 








O 






CO 












• 


4-J 






CO 


CO x: 












CO 








CO 




u 










QJ 














QJ 












X 


5-1 






a 


QJ CO 


4-1 



















Q) 




< 










•H 
XI 








4J 
CO 






•H 
X 






CO 




00 


5-t 




< 




X 


•H 

e 


•H 'H 

X c 


CO 
CO 


CO 




CO 




•H 

E 




CO 




•H 
X 


CO 


iH 










D 








CO 


















•H 





rH 




W 





3 CO 


<; 


CJ 




CJ 














3 


a 


CO 










4-1 








< 






4-1 






•H 




a CJ 


CO 






c 


4J a 




•H 




•H 




C 




•H 




u 


•H 


•H 




CO 






CO 














CO 






4-1 




>. 




•H 




rH 





CO CO 


X 


4J 




4-1 









4-J 




CO 


4-1 


^ 


^ 


CO 




rC 




-C 


QJ 


X 


x: 


QJ 


.£ 




x: 




CO 


QJ 


H 


00 


5-1 


00 


CO 


a 




3 


CO 


QJ 


CO 









CO 






CO 


■P 


CO 


0) 




CO 


rH 


CO 


O 


CO 


CO 


O 


CO 


rH 


CO 




e 


CJ 




c 


4.J 


C 





w 


rH X 


4-1 


e 





e 




w 




g 


x^ 


rH 


g 


W 


•H 


c 


CJ 


•H 


CO 


•H 


C 


•H 


•H 


c 


•H 


CO 


•H 




QJ 


C 


c 


•H 


CO 


•H 


•H 




CO a 


CO 


QJ 


c 


QJ 






CJ 


QJ 





CO 


QJ 


3 


rH 


•H 


•H 


M 


•H 


C 


QJ 


rH 


rH 


QJ 


.H 


•H 


c 




rC 


QJ 


•H 


X 


3 


X 


CO 


QJ 


•H C 




x: 


QJ 


rC 




QJ 


•H 


X 


C 


•H 


rC 


X) 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


O 


CO 


•H 


DO 


00 


•H 


00 





CO 


4-1 


4-1 


•H 


4-1 


CO 


X 


CO 


>, 




QJ 


CJ 


4-1 


•H 




4-1 


e 


CO 


4-1 


QJ 


a 


4-1 


C 


C 


D 


D 


C 


O 


a 


O 


C 


c 


a 


C 





(X 


5-1 


CO 





CO 


Q) 


c 


QJ 


rC 





u 





CO 


CJ 


CO 


5-1 





3 


CO 


!H 





CO 


1— 1 


W 


PQ 


S 


w 


CO 


CO 


CO 


W 


w 


CO 


w 


CO 


CO 


<: 


S 


CO 


hJ 


Pi 


M 


oi 


Ph 


X 


CO fi4 


CO 


S 


CO 


S 


<! 


ffi 


S 


s 


P4 


CO 


s 



QJ f-3 
00 

5-1 t3 
O C • 
QJ O CJ 

•> CO rC 

CO pc; o 

•H i-D 

5-1 »> 

QJ CO » 



X 5-1 

5-1 CO QJ <! 

CO XI !-i 

X: CJ -H X 

a -H CO vi 

•H Pi rH CO 

Pi ox 
o 

- S-I •> 



a QJ 

3 rH 

CO QJ 

2 m 



>, QJ 

rH X 



5-1 00 

CO 00 

CO rH e QJ 

5-1 CO CO rH 

PQ U CJ CJ 



00 -H 
!-i rH 
O QJ 
CO fJ-t 
QJ 'H 
Q P 



Pi . .^ 

^ 00 

•> X C " 

CO CO -H CO 

CO X e QJ 

g 00 QJ -H 

3 C rH !-4 

Q W |i^ PL^ 



QJ 














. 


<c 


s 


5-1 








C 










s 


^ s 


Ph • 






•-) 









CO 


• 


• <: • 










S 


CO 


QJ 




Qh* 






•-) 


s 


• <: h4 






CO 


CD C 


. CO 


5-4 


CO 


«v 






>^ 






C '-n CO 


W* 




•H 


3 


1x4 QJ QJ 


CO 


•H 




X 


PQ 


u • 


>^ IS* 


QJ 


CO i-H QJ X 




P 





5-4 QJ 


e 3 


X 


3 


:2* 


u 




CO <; 


5-1 





CO X rH C 


X • 




•H 


X CO 3 


• S-i 







CO 


3 


CJ 


CO C 


•H 


3 QJ 5-1 5-1 CO 


api 


QJ 


5-1 


CO CD 


G- ►-) CO 


<; CO 


P 


3 


X 


•H 


g 


S 


3 


CO 5-1 CO CO g 


rH 


3 


+-1 


3 


QJ N 


M 




X 





X 


^ CO 


X 


CO 


X CJ X 5-1 


CO CO 


3 


CO 


4-1 PKj 


CO - 3 


3 


•s 





•H 





QJ -H 


" 1-4 


^ 


• rH CJ <: 


Pi X 


CO 


PM 


CO 


3 CO 


3 - 


3 


>-) 


Pi 


Pi 


00 rH 


CO 




S -H - 


c 


N 






I-) -H 


<; >. 











X rH 


4J 


r. 


IS ^ - - 


" -H 


3 


>^ 


r, X 


rH ». 


4-1 


CO 


r, 


«v 


•s 


•H -H 


4-1 


c 


Q) >^l+H 


QJ hJ 


CO 


•H 


X <-\ 


- X 3 


^ CO 


X 


•H 


QJ 


Ai 


V4 12 


- 


CO 


3 - C 4J 3 


M 




N 


U CO 


X 00 


>^ S: 


5-1 


3 


3 


CO 


X 


•H QJ 


B 


CO 5-4 CO 5-1 QJ 


QJ - 


r. 


CO 


CO 3 


00 3 4-1 


CO CO 


CO 


•H 





5-1 


,i^ - 


rH C 


M-4 


00 QJ N QJ 


rH CO 


^ 


4-1 


3 


3 CO rH 


5-1 X 


X 


CD 


CD 


CO 


U MH 


00 X 


UH 


5-1 Q) [^ > X 


CJ rH 





+J 


>^ Q 


P P 3 


5-4 CO 





CD 


CD 


X 





3 





3 5-1 CO QJ 


QJ 





3 


CO 


CJ 


3 CO 


•H 





CO 





4-1 


ffi 


P 


P fc£i fc^ eJ hJ 


hJ P 

■K 


P 


p 


S S 


s s s 


S 2 


Pi 


Pi 


CO 


CO 


CO H 



121 






vcocsirooN-j-r^O'— ivDvDCNiocrimoovocr>i/^or-^ 

O^a^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^a^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^0^ 

























< 
























X) 


















































u 


























S 












, 












S 


























n 












•a 






































4J 












w 












•> 


























3 
























(U 
















• 










O 












s 












■M 
















H 










•H 
























(0 
















• 










4-1 












•< 












4J 
















< 


















en 




E 

03 












CO 
















S 










c 












-C 












u 




• 






















c 








CQ 




OO 












03 




CO 












»- 




< 






o 












C 












4-) 




• 












01 










u 








•> 




•H 












CO 




PQ 








en 




4-1 

03 




s 














CU 

oo 




E 

03 










en 


01 




^ 








CQ 




4-1 




•> 






p 








03 




J-i 












)-l 




>^ 












CO 




e 














I-H 




i^ 


• 








CQ 


o 


CO* 


■U 




-a 




•> 








03 






#> 








rH 






< 










2: 




•H 




w 




QJ 




c 


< 


4= 






• 








o 




w. 










•V 




PQ* 


(0 




• 




GO 




o 




M 




• 


en 




• 




o 




• 


^ 








0) 


r> 




V^ 




s 




0) 




4-1 


CQ 


C 




<: 






<c 






• 


< 










00 


• 


•N 


0) 


^ 






t— 1 




CO 




•H 






CQ 








rH 


t3 




CQ 








03 


< 


03 


> 


r. 




rH 




o 


>^ 


E 




CQ 






CQ 




03 


W 


CQ 










rH 




>-( • 


• -H 


o 


• 




O 




CQ 


OJ 


03 






r. 








C 


• 




>s 








I-H 


CQ 


03 CO 


:r. c 


XI 




O 






QO 


J-i 




•. 


>^ 




r. 




o 


S 


«v 


>% 








O 




^ • 


• ZD 


w 








r. 


QJ 


Ci. 


• 


0) 


4J 




>^ 




•H 




03 


4-1 








CLJ 


« 


03 CQ 


CQ 


o 






OJ 


tyD 




rH 




CO 


GO 


•H 


• 


4-1 




4-1 


•V 


OO 


•H 










>. 


rH 


QJ 


en 




+J 




< 


M 


•> 


• 


OJ 


CO 


en 


•H 




03 


• 


03 


CO 




en 


cn 


C 


4-1 


03 - 


•" 4-1 


I 






« 


CQ 




O 




CQ 


iH 


u 




CO 


cn 


C 


cn 


rH 


!-i 








3-1 


•H 


Q 03 


(D cc 


CQ 




4-1 




CQ 


o 


CO 




1 — 1 


0) 


CQ 


!-i 




5-1 


• 


1 — 1 


01 


en 


CQ 


CQ 


OJ 


CO 


00 


CC JJ 


o 

CO 






CO 


•v 






• 


•V 


o 


> 




03 


CQ 


03 


CQ 


o 


> 








^ 


)-i 


M-i QJ 


0; m 


r. 






0) 


». 


01 


CQ 


0) 


CJ 


•H 


•> 


> 




4-1 




u 


•H 


CQ 


f 


•N 


4-1 


QJ 


O M 


— 


u 




c 


4-J 


• 


4-1 




4-1 




C 


!-i 


•H 


•^ 


C 


»> 




c 




u 


S-I 


3 


> 


I-H 


^- c 


0) 




CO 


03 


W 


03 


». 


03 


0) 


^ 


03 


C 


B 


M 


E 


03 


^ 


»> 


OJ 


OJ 


O 


•H 


>. O 


c c 


■U 




•H 


4-1 


CO 


4-) 


00 


4-1 


e 




4-1 


^3 


03 




03 


E 




OO 


4-1 


4-1 


en 


C 


•u O 


CJ -u 


H 


CB 




X 


en 


03 


en 


u 


cn 


03 


01 


03 




J= 


c 


-C 


03 


QJ 


3-1 


03 


03 




113 


•H 


tc 


5 




a 




X 




3 




o 


en 


^ 


c 


00 


03 


00 Q 


CO 


3 


15 


:b 


03 




CO C 


c c 


LJJ 


<U 




« 


c 




i-H 


J3 


c 




3 


03 


o 


c 


CJ 


d 




3 


^ 


0) 


QJ 


X 


c 


S-i O 


C -M 


&c 




i-H 


o 


M-l 


M 


x: 


o 


0) 


ej 


00 


Cfl 


•H 


•H 


•H 


QJ 


a 


^ 


GO 


GO 


•H 


o 


03 CO 


■u. ^ 


LAJ 


-o 




n3 


4-1 


O 


0) 


a 


4-1 


>-i 


03 


X) 


^ 


E 


S-i 


E 


i~i 


03 


O 


X 


X 


U 


4-1 


> -H 


w « 


•H 




CX 


CO 




^ 


4-1 


cn 


4-) 


>-l 


•H 


o 


03 


03 


03 


4J 


3-1 


4-1 


•H 


•H 


o 


CO 


•H X 


C C5 


GC 


u 




cx 


o 




O 


•H 


o 


O 


>% 


}-i 


03 


»-i 


1 


5-1 


O 


>^ 


•H 


3-1 


>-i 


rH 


o 


C 03 


EC 3 


CQ 




< 


CQ 


;=) 


kJ 


li. 


CQ 


2 


en 


CQ 


n 


fe 


P^ 


2 


en 


PH 


CQ 


PQ 


f^ 


CQ 


P S 




1- 


















































CO 
























C 

o 

•H 






















c 
o 

•H 


tc 


UJ 
























■P 
















00 






4J 


w c 










CO 














CO 














CO 


c 




CO 


03 


O -H 


< 










<u 














O 














QJ 


•H 




OJ 


O 


— ~ 










•H 














3 














•H 


X 




•H 


3 


sJ C^ 










73 






CO 








TS 












CO 


XI 


03 




X 


X CO 


- O 










3 






o 








w 












a 


3 


OJ 




3 


w a 


•ui &; 


o 


I— 1 


>, 






4-) 






•H 




















•H 


4J 


P^ 




4-1 


•H 


'y: --^ 


n3 


u 






CO 






4-1 








-H 












4-1 


en 






CO 


.H 4J 


^ 




D, 


d 


W) 


QJ 






01 


03 


OJ 


GO ^ 


03 


m 


00 


OO c^ 




03 




4= 


x; 




03 03 


— 1 'X 




•H 


XJ 


c 


a 


f— 1 




a 


E 


a 


c 


crj 


O 




c 


c 






E 


I-H 


CO 


CO 


rH 


O E 


r: -H 




O 


01 


•H 


c 


03 


CJ 


C 


OJ 


c 


•H 


•H 


•H 


03 


•H 


•H 


03 




03 


03 


•H 


•H 


03 


•H 03 


•H i-H 




c 


t-i 


-o 


QJ 


•H 


•H 


01 


x 


01 


Xl 


r-H 


CO 


X) 


X) 


XI 


X 




x: 


•H 


>-l 


1— 1 


•H 


CO x 


o cc 




•H 


o 


fO 


•H 


U 


Cfl 


•H 


4-1 


•H 


03 


00 


>^ 


03 


03 


03 


03 


4-1 


•U 


O 


00 


00 


O 


>^ -u 


o c 




>-i 


01 


q; 


a 


O 


3 


a 


03 


a 


OJ 


c 


-n 


(-1 


01 


03 


U 


}-l 


03 


O 


C 


C 


O 


X 03 


c/i a 




Cu 


en 


0!i 


en 


in 


s 


CO 


:s 


en 


Cci 


w 


Pu 


O 


PC 


PC 


o 


< 


2 


en 


W 


W 


CO 


P^ 2 





S 






w 


J 


4J 

QJ 


c 

QJ 


X 




QJ • < 


>. • • 






CO 

CO 


Ui 


>^ 




• 


< ^ 




C 


5-1 




J 


C 03 


U kJ o 






03 4-1 PQ 




X 


• 


"-3 


o 


C 


03 


3 


03 




03 03 -H 


03 • 




u 


t—\ 4J 


C 


4-1 


e: 




S-I c 


•H 


•-3 


03 


•H 


0! 


00 C O 


E 2 -c QJ 






C GO QJ X 


03 


O 




^ 


QJ 03 


> 




hJ 


CJ 


X 


S-I -H 'H 


01 4-1 C 


> 


4-1 


QJ 3 S-I QJ 


I-H 


S-I 


•H 


c 


4-1 OJ 


0) 


»• 




5-1 


c 


O 00 V^ 


CO C -r^ 'r^ 




01 


rH O S-I S-I 


fH 


o 


E 


cfl 


QJ ^ 


t^ 


^ 


». 


03 


•H 


03 Q3 4-1 


O C X 03 


03 


c 


QJ Q 03 X 


< 


Q 


O 


S-I 


Di W 




CJ 


c 


S 


-J 


O OCJ 03 


Oi >^ 3 S-I 


C 


03 


X CJ -H 






03 


PL, 




•« 


•H 


o 






Oh 


^ "-i U 


C 


>-> 


•H 


» 


•- 


Z 




». w^ 


4-1 


S-J 




». 


•> 


- •^ 


O 


< 




- C - 2 


S-I 


01 




•- 


>, 03 


4J 


4-1 


00 


C 


X 


C 4-1 - 


C - - kJ 




»■ 


rH S-I C 


OJ 


3 


•> 


Q 


01 -H 


•H 


03 


c 


o 


c 


O -H ,H 


03 QJ X 


" 


CO 


OJ 3 QJ - 


x 


4= 


X 


X 


rH 5-1 


S-I 


D- 


•H 


CO 


03 


CO 03 -H 


^ rH 00 - 


•H 


XI 


4J X X 4-1 


a 


o; 


S-I 


c 


X 03 


QJ 


N 


S-I 


01 


rO 


5^ 5 -H 


O ^ 3 X 


CO 


5j 


4J X rH X 


.-H 


c 


03 


o 


2^ 


E 


4J 


V^ 


c 


CO 


QJ rH O 


o S-I o 00 


CO 


01 


•H O 3 C 


QJ 


o 


01 


•H 


QJ 


•H 


03 


01 


3 


> 03 a 


a QJ rH 3 


o 


x; 


CX O O 3 


CO 


Q 


CQ 


CQ 


PQ Q 


Q 


fc 


ad 


3C 


ac 


M 1^ 2 


S 2 Pu Pm 


oi 


en 


CO 12 >H >H 



122 



Oi— la^voc^J^-^o^mm<rsl^oo^<ra^oo^ooa^Ln 
o^ o^ o^ o\ o^ o^ o^ (y^ o^ o^ o^ o^ o^ o^ o^ o^ o^ ^^ o^ o^ 



O 
O 

X 

o 

(0 

-J 

< 
cc 

o 

UJ 













^ 
















, 








CD 




















}-i 










. 






CO 








3 




















<u 










13 






• 








S 




















4-1 










Cd 


< 




pa 




























CO 








en 


• 














S 




















5 










S 


S 




»> 


















• 










0) 








pa 








QJ 


• 






»^ 


• 








^3 










00 










#. 


». 




00 c/^ 






o 


cn 








M 










T3 








•s 


Td 


• 




QJ 


• 




• 


•H 


• 


















•H 








>. 


u 


C/D 




i-H 


pa 




C/0 


CD 


pa 








s 






• 




S-i 




• 




4.J 


CO 






1 — 1 






• 


3 
















cn 




PQ 




CO 




•H 


> 


pa 




o 


r. 


• 


pa 


:z: 


•^ 




CO 




r< 


















CD 


»-i 






u 


0) 


CO 






>^ 








. 




• 


m 




«> 




m 


• 


}-i 


CO 


•> 






00 


• 


». 


pa 


4-1 




pa 




< 




C/3 








• 




CO 


0) 


!£ 


>. 




CD 


OJ 


PQ 


QJ 




•H 














•N 




m 


<; 


•s 




> 




4-1 




5-1 


I-H 




c 


» 


CD 


• 


f 




m 




pa 


>, 








>. pa 


•H 


•^ 


•H 




. QJ 


I-H 


•N 


•H 


>. 


5h 


C/3 


>. 










+-> 




< 


pq 


■u 




c 


• 


CD 


• 


x; 


O 


QJ 


CO 


4-J 


QJ 




4-i 


• 


r. 




r. 




CO 






•H 


r. 


:=) 


CO 


5-1 


C/D 


a 


u 


OO S 


•H 


> 


pa 


•H 


en 


<u 




Q) 


CO 




<^ 


r> 


CD 


QJ 






QJ 




CO 




QJ 




CD 


•H 




CD 




00 




00 


s_ 


PQ 


QJ 


0) 


>-i 


00 


c 


pq* 


> 


pa 


OJ 


Q) 


I-H 


14H 


5h 


C 


•^ 


5-1 


pa 


(U 




QJ 


OJ 




00 


oo 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 




•H 




H 


4-1 


I-H 


O 


QJ 


P 


QJ 


QJ 




I-l 




,—1 


> 


r. 


QJ 


QJ 


> 


T— 1 


QJ 


^ 


c 


•N 




CO 


O 




> 




4-1 


> 


- 


I— 1 




iH 




a 


,-H 


rH 


•H 


i-H 


S-i 


s 


p 


£ 


c 


4-1 


CJ 


>^ 


•H 


QJ 


CO 


iH 


B 


o 




O 


e 


CD 


rH 


rH 


c 


o 


O 


CO 




CO 


o 


CO 




4-1 


C 


4-1 


4-1 


C 


CO 


o 




u 


=> 


X 


o 


o 


p) 


o 




x; 


QJ 


x: 


u 




CO 


•H 


P 


CO 


CO 


P 


X 










00 o 


C_) 






OO 


00 


CD 


oo 


00 


CO 


+J 


CD 




4-) 






00 


c 




>, 


c 


c 






c 


?^ 


c 


c 


d 


c 


c 


•H 


CO 


5h 


c 


CD 


c 


c 


c 


o 




QJ 


o 


•H 


en 


CD 


o 


QJ 


•H 


•H 


o 


•H 


•H 


5-1 


•H 


QJ 


o 




o 


o 


•H 






iH 


J-l 


e 


•H 


•H 


u 


r-H 


I— I 


e 


CO 


E 


6 


O 


d 


> 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


4-) 


£ 


m 




CD 


M 


CO 


00 


00 


CD 


CD 


[3 


CT3 


S-i 


CO 


5-1 


d- 


CO 


•H 


CD 


c 


CD 


CD 


CO 


o 




QJ 


O 


u 


0) 


OJ 


O 


q; 





5-1 


>^ 


5-1 


CO 


B 


D 


C 


O 


QJ 


O 


O 


5-^ 


« 




C 
QJ 
4-1 


m 


g 

•H 
+J 
CO 
O 

3 

s 


Pi 


P^ 


pa 


hJ 


pa 


fe 


C/3 

c 

QJ 

4-1 


c 

QJ 
4J 


fe 


W 


•-) 


P 


pa 


fc«i 


pa 


pa 


(^ 


rH 


>^ 


)-l 


















5-1 


5-1 




















CvJ 


u 


03 




; — 1 














CO 


CO 




















a 


CO 


00 CN 


CO 


00 




CNl 


<rsj 


en 


,-H 


00 


00 CN 


en 


,-H 


I-H 




CN 


rH 


m 


, — 1 


•H 


4-> 


U 




CJ 


c 












S-I 


5-1 




















a 


QJ 


OJ 


QJ 


•H 


•H 




QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


Q) 


QJ 


QJ 


a 


0) 


QJ 


OJ 


QJ 


C 


J-i 


-o 


-o 


W 


^3 




T3 


T3 


-o 


Td 


-o 


-a 


T3 


-a 


T3 


XI 


•H 


T3 


-a 


-a 


TJ 


•H 


O 


c 


CD 


>. 


CO 


u 


CO 


CO 


CT3 


CO 


C 


c 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


5-1 


QJ 


•H 


S-i 


x: 


cu 


u 


!-i 


U 


>-i 


!-i 


•H 


•H 


5-1 


5-1 


5h 


5-1 


3 


!-i 


5-1 


5-1 


U 


PL, 


CO 


fc^ 


O 


fi^ 


0i 


< 


U 


o 


O 


O 


fc^ 


^ 


O 


o 


O 


O 


S 


O 


O 


o 


o 





















QJ 


0) 












-a 
















fe 


I-H 


I-H 






o 






JH 


















rH 


I-H 












CO 










• 






• 0) 


•rH 





CJ 




S-I 






rC • P^ 










Pi 






< 3 


a 


X 






o 


. 




a Pi 


• 






• • 








•iH 


3 


a 


X 




3 


w 


• 


•H . OJ 


<; 


• 


• 


W ►-J 


QJ W 


J 




>. X 


hJ 


•rH 


+J 


J 


CO 




X 


OS hJ CO 3 




s 


s 




a 




QJ 


x a 




X. 


•rH 




OJ 


CO 




•H -H 


QJ 






CO CO 


•H 5h 


3 


•H 


+J OJ 


«> 




T3 


CO 


I-H 


•rH 


3 


- >. X 5h 


3 


3 


CO 


00 5-1 


3 O 


>^ 


Sh 


O CD 


X 


r. 


3 


Sh 


w 


X 


CO 


^ O 4J QJ 


3 


QJ 


5h 


I-H T3 


CO 3 


iH 


O 


5^ O 




3 


1-1 


X) 




4-1 


OJ 


a t-3 3 x 


CO 


<-i 


3 


O 3 


►-3 CO 


•H 


•r-i 


o 1-^ 


Sh 


•H 




3 


r. 


3 


►d 


•H >, 4-1 


QJ 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


Sh 


5-1 


Q 


O 


CO 


r> 


CO 


5-1 


>. 




^4 »> CJ CO 


*-: 


K 


S 


- CO 


" I-H 


CO 


CO 




3 


B 


3 


CO 


QJ 


CJ 


•V 


■UJ CO U 








3 


4-1 W 


S 


S 


- 3 


CD 


u 


CO 




4-1 




QJ 


CO iH •> 


f 


r. 


•^ 


o - 


■ut 






QJ O 


QJ 


QJ 


X 


r. 


CD 


•V 


5-J 


a rH c - 


>^ 


3 


QJ 


CD QJ 


0) ^ 


«s 


•V 


I-H X 


rH 


CJJ 


5-1 


4-1 


QJ 


XI 


Q 


N O >. --H 


X2 


3 


^ 


^ > 


3 UH 


CO 


N 


4-1 CO 


TJ 




QJ 


Sh 


> 


o 


g 


4-1 M-i r-t 1-H 


X 


CO 


5-1 


5h -H 


5h l+H 


Xl 


■Ul 


■M S 


'O 




rC 


O 


rH 


o 


4J 


•H CO iH QJ 


•H 


S-I 


3 


CO I-H 


CO 3 


3 


CO 


•H O 


•H 


.U 


a 


X 


i^ 


S-I 


(U 


p=L, M < pa 


pa 


pa 


pa 


U U 


O ffi 


'-D 


^ 


kJ S 


S 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


H 


:2 



123 



vc.— 1-— i<roo>coi/^cNCNimr^crv<r<rocsjcNoroCT\vDcr>cT\aNt-HcNm 

CT^0^0^0^0^O^0^0^0^0^O^O^O^CT^O^CT^O^O^C7^0^O^CT^O^0^CT^a^O^CT^ 



o 
o 

X 

o 

o 
o 

_l 

UJ 
UJ 



< 















































T) 


























































U 
































< 


























S 






























































XJ 




























S 


























4-1 




W 




























•> 


























•H 




S 




























E 




















• 






CO 














• 


















CO 




















< 






>-i 




»> 










•o 


















X 


























CU 




CU 










M 


















OO -13 


















PQ 






> 




00 


• 


























c 


w 
























•H 




CU 


cn 








s* 


















•H 

6 


<: 


















O 






CD 




I-H 


pq' 








«> 


















0) 




















C 










O 










(U 


















}-4 


s 


















•H 






C 




CJ 


rv 


XI 






■M 


















fe 




















XI 






o 






3 


w 






to 




















»> 


















>-l 






4-1 




3 


J-i 








4J 


















•^ 


cu 


















03 






CO 


X3 


o 


CU 


s 






cn 


















PQ 


4-1 

0! 


















5-1 






o 

PQ 


W 


4-1 
CO 


CO 








c 




















■M 


















CU 








S 


o 


03 


E*^ 






o 


















< 


CO 


















PQ 






»^ 




PQ 


CU 


CO 






■UI 
























<^ 




















• 


^^ 




x: 


x: 






CD 


















»> 


c 


















C 






cn 


CU 


•^ 


4J 


OO 






O 


















CU 


o 




PQ 














03 


o 




• 


4-1 


• 


U 


C 






pq 












. 


. 




00 

OJ 


4-1 

cn 


. 






CO 






. 




CO 


•H 
CO 




PQ 


03 

4-1 


cn 


o 


•H 

E 




. 


t\ 












<c 


< 




<—\ 


o 


CO 


>^ 




• 






cn 




4J 


3 




r. 


cn 


pq' 




0) 




cn 


• 


















iH 


PQ 




4-1 


cn 


PQ 










03 


s 




c 






M-l 


5-1 






en 












PQ* 


PQ 


. 


o 




PQ* 


•H 
CO 


pq' 




. 




PQ* 


< 


>. 






•H 
CO 


o 


>^ 


o 


PH 




PQ 


CQ 




• 








>^ 


r. 


CO 




. 


r. 


V-i 




co" 


PQ 




rv 




4J 


PQ 




C 


4-1 


4-1 


CU 


«v 




^ 






CO 








Cfl 


OJ 




i-H 


cn 


. 


CU 


•s 


E 






OJ 


pq' 


•H 






o 


CO 


•H 


OO 


. 




. 


•> 












0) 


OO PQ 


i-H 


• 


CO 


> 


>^ nH 


< 




00 




CO 


»> 




o 


o 


CO 


CU 


< 


• 


CO 


OJ 




PQ 






• 


X 


CJ 




03 


PQ 


CO 


•H 


4-) 


W 






CU 


" 


>-i 


>. cn 


CO 


PQ 


u 


rH 




CO 


CO • 


GO 








• 


CO 


0) 


I— 1 


»> 


^ 




03 


C 


•H 




»- 


• 


rH 


0) 


CU 


4-1 


• 


•H 




CU 


rH 


PQ 


• 


0! cn 


0) 




•> 


en 


en 


• 


H 


1—1 


0) 


w 


r. 


s 


t^ 


CO 


OJ 


CU 


CO 


rH 


OO 


> 


•H 


PQ 


rs 


•> 


> 


o 




PQ 


S • 


I— t 




<u 


• 


• 


PQ 




o 


•u 


}-l 


CD 






»-i 


X 


00 


• 


o 


CU 


•H 


CO 






• 


•H 


o 


•\ 




PQ 


iH 




u 


PQ 


PQ 




M-( 


CJ) 


03 


03 


00M-( 


C 


0) 


4-1 


CU 


PQ 


CJ) 


J—i 


C 


}-i 


«\ 


<4-4 


PQ 


3 




CU 


•V 


<+H 


O 




rt 






n 


O 




4-1 


S 


(U 


o 


03 


> 




I-H 






rH 


;:d 


CU 


CU 


O 




p 


CU 


OO 


CU 


o - 


U 




4-) 


«s 


r. 


5-1 




u 


cn 




i-H 




>s 


•H 


<+-( 


r-^ 


-. 


^3 


o 




> 


4-1 




< 




> 


CU 


4-1 


S-I 






cn 


6 


E 


(U 


>-. 


CO 




■^ 


i-H 


>^ 


CU 


C 


o 


o 


E 


rH 


u 


CU 


•H 


0) 


>^ 




CU 


3 


I-H 


03 


>. CU 


I— 1 






03 


03 


4J 


4-1 


QJ 


x) 




O 


4-1 


iH 


tD 




U 


03 


CU 




4-1 


c 


4J 


4-1 


•^ 


4-1 


O 


rH 


4J 


+J 4J 


I— 1 




c 


x; 


x: 


03 


•H 


>-4 


iH 


C 


O 


•H 


CO 




>. 




X 


•H 


rH 


03 


:=) 


CO 


•H 


rH 


03 


PQ 


O 


cn 


•H 03 


•H 




3 


&o 


00 


5 


CO 


u 


(U 


•H 




CO 


(U 


E 


XI 


c 


00 


>4-( 


CU 


4-J 






CO 


CU 


4J 




CJ 




CO [5 


X 




O 


c 


c 


0) 


>-l 




•H 


rH 


c 


!-< 


:2 


oJ 


03 


o 


c 


OO 


3 


CO 


c 


C 


>-4 


3 


cn 


3 




3 


5-1 CU 


0) 




4-1 


•H 


•H 


00 


(U 


>-< 


M-l 


^ 


o 


CU 




x 


t-J 


4-1 


•H 


C 


c 




o 


o 


CU 


3 




O 


0) 


O 


CU OO 


c 




N 


e 


6 


-a 


> 


03 


4J 


c 


CO 


> 


o 


XI 




0! 


E 


•rH 


03 






4-i 


> 


o3 


4-1 


4-1 


^ 


4-1 


> XI 


o 




4-1 


03 


03 


•H 


•H 


^ 


W 


03 


X 


•H 


•H 


!-i 


S-i 


CU 


03 


>-l 


E 


rH 


CO 


CO 


•H 


E 


3 


CO 


3 


CO 


•H -H 


■u 




3 


U 


U 


>-i 


C 


CU 


01 


U 


0) 


c 


X 


O 


3 


jC 


>-i 


Cu 


E 


0) 


o 


o 


c 


E 


CU 


o 


CU 


o 


3 i-l 


w 




t^ 


f^ 


fn 


PQ 
w 

4J 

< 


c 
o 

•H 

4-) 

03 
O 

W 


U 


c 
cu 


Cfi 

(U 

•H 
X) 

3 


PQ 

CO 

o 


P 


o 


CO 
4-1 


O 




P^ 


CO 


w 


CJ 


PQ 


pq 

CO 
CU 
•H 
X3 
3 


p 




^ 


PQ 
3 

o 

•H 
4-i 
0) 
O 

3 
X3 
W 


t^ 


P3 

CO 
o 


p PQ 


i-H 


>^ 














i-l 


4-1 


•H 






















4-1 












•H 




CO 


i-l 








0) 


t— 1 




03 


cn 


4-1 






CU 
















CO 








rH 




4-1 




D- 


03 


i-H 


<r 


CN 


00 


03 


ro 


00 




03 


CNl 


<t 


00 CNJ 


rH 


<r 


rn 




CN 






t-o 


rH 


-d- 


03 


00 


0) 


CU rH 


•H 


4-1 








03 


O 




i-t 


r-H 


E 






03 
















rH 








a 


c 


E 


O 


O 


0) 


0) 


cu 


CU 


3 


•H 


0) 


(U 


0) 


CU 


<u 


0) 


d 


CU 


CU 


CU 


CU 




CU 


O 


03 


CU 


CU 


cu 


•H 


•H 


CU 


3 CU 


C 


V^ 


-o 


-a 


T3 


00 


C/3 


XI 


tJ 


•H 


x: 


XI 


XI 


00 X) 


X3 


X3 


XI 




XI 


•H 


•H 


X3 


X) 


XI 


CO 


XI 


X 


CU X3 


•H 


a 


03 


03 


OJ 


c 


>^ 


03 


c 


O 


4J 


0) 


03 


c 


03 


03 


03 


03 


4-1 


03 


CO 


a 


03 


03 


03 


>^ 


03 


4-1 


•H 03 


>-i 


<u 


U 


u 


>-i 


03 


X 


U 


•H 


O 


03 


!-i 


)-i 


03 


u 


U 


u 


i-l 


>-( 


u 


3 


o 


U 


i-t 


u 


x 


CU 


03 


O 5-1 


Pl, 


CO 


u 


o 


o 


hJ 


Pm 


o 


i^ 


CO 


S 


O 


O 


hJ 


O 


O 


o 


O 


<: 


o 


S 


CO 


o 


O 


O 


Pm 


t:^ 


S 


cn O 







S^ 




. 
















H 







. 








W 




hJ 






. 


CU 


. 


CJ 






















<: • 










OJ 






. 


^ 


E 3 


U • 








rJ 






W 




4J 


03 




pd 






3 


>. 





>^ < 


2 


t—J 




03 -H 


w 


03 




PQ 












OJ 


•H 




3 


. 




3 


5-4 


3 


X 






03 


'H 5-1 


>% 


XI 


. 




XI 




. 


3 


CU 


V-i 


X 




>. x 


<: 




<: 


03 


03 


4-1 OJ 


03 •-) 


^ 


1-1 


i-l OJ 


5-1 CO 


3 


PQ 


^ 


i-l 




IS 


>^ 


3 


0) cn 


4-1 




rH 0) 




• 




2 


4-1 


rH 


5-1 


c 


03 


•H x: 


• 03 03 


•H 




3 


03 


fx.* 




rH 


3 


00 


3 


CU 


•H 5-1 


CU 


2 


>^ 




CO 


5-1 


3 03 


03 


JD 


2: 4-" 


^ 2 E 


hJ 


03 


03 


5 




3 


CU 


03 


i-l 3 


>> 


3 


5-< 


a 




5-1 


•> 


3 


5-1 


03 CO 


5-1 


S-i 


03 







r-i 


i-l 


X) 


>^ 


CU 


Ti 


CU 


03 3 


CJ 


QJ 


03 X 


•H 


03 


03 


CU 





P 03 


hJ 0) 


u^ 


03 


- Ui 


3 - x: 


r. 


3 


(i^ 


w 





I-H 


03 


CO 


S < 




rH 


2 CU 


3 


3 


2 








U 


5-1 




PQ 


>-, 


C I-H H 


CU 


03 






3 


OJ 


2 







»> 


5-1 


^ Q 


03 


03 




•H 




»> 


„ 01 


f 




X - 


<: rH 


c 


Oh 


»> 


>> 


03 


X 




c^ 


•^ ». 


3 


< 




•-) 


•H 


r. 


Pi 


»> 


13 '• 


CO X 


3 


•» 


4J 4-) 


0) ► 


03 




E 


3 


2 




•> 




CO U-I 


CU 




>% " 




Q 





1 


CO 


CU 


5-1 H 




>. 


0) 3 


- 5 rH 


3 


•- 


03 


CU 




K 


CU 


•^ 


3 


CO 


r~ 


X 3 


•N 




4-1 


CO 


3 


3 


OJ 


E 


01 


3 


>.XI rH 


•H 


CO 


X 


rH 


r. 


T3 


3 


CO 


•H 4-1 


3 





03 


3 


•> 


3 


0) 


•H 


15 -H 


XI »> 


U-i 


3 


U E 


CU rH (U 


rH 


•H 


3 


-o 


x 


rH 


CU 


CO 


^ CO 


OJ 


r-i 


CJ CO 





CO 


3 


XI 


XI 


^ 03 


3 >. 


tl_l 


3 


CU rH 


M 3 5 


r-H 


> 


i-l 


3 


CO 


3 


(U 





3 -H 


i-l 


r-i 


f-i rH 


CO 


>H 


3 





X 


E 


3 03 


o 


CU 


x <u 


03 03 


3 


03 


03 


•H 


•H 


Q 


i-l 


i-l 


CU 1-1 


03 





3 CU 


rH 


U 


QJ 


X 








03 X 


3C 


^ 


< (£> 


CJ CJ 


(J 





fju 


tlH 


PH 


<iD 


CJ 


CJ 


•-) |:>!i 


hJ 


s 


2 Z 








CU 


P!i 


pc; 


P£i Pii 


CO cn 



124 



00 r^ CO 
v«D vo t^ 
On 0> C3^ 






ON ON 



0^ ON 





















CO* 
































< 




























































PQ 




























pq 
































•> 




























n 






















. 










CO 




























CU 






















CO 










4J 




























oo 








• 




• 










• 










c 




























cu 








CO 




CO 










S 










o 




























I— 1 


















2: 














QJ 




























rH 








s 




s 










r. 




CO 






d 




























O 


















oi 




• 




• 






o 
















• 












CJ> 








•s 




». 










> 




s 






















CO 




















• 




>. 






»v 




•H 










+j 




























C 








c 




4-1 






oo 




c 




». 






CO 
















s 












o 








c 




•H 




• 


c 




P 




d 
















• 


















4-) 








o 




CO 




< 


•H 








s-l 






^ 










CO 






K 












CO 








u 




!-i 






CO 




d 




QJ 






5-1 
















(U 












O 












QJ 




S 


!-i 




o 




4-1 






O 










• M 






bO 












PQ 








c 




> 






d 




4-1 




CO 






>-' 










< 






0) 




















S-i 




•H 




>^ 


2 




CO 




CO 
















• (V 






rH 












•> 








QJ 




C 




• 






o 




QJ 






:5 










PQ QJ 






iH 












• 








^ 




r:3 




<: 


t4-< 




PQ 




X 






0) 










W) 






o 












23 








4-J 










o 








4-1 






2 










^ 0) 






CJ 




















d 




C 




pq' 






r. 




S-l 








• 








(U iH 
















. 


fii 








o 




O 






i-H 




• 




o 






"4-1 


CO 








U rH 






c 










T3 










CO 




4-1 




»> 


O 




CO 




z 






o 


• 








•H O 






o 










W 


•^ 












CO 




4-1 


o 




• 












S 






• 


r^ U 






4-1 










• 


rH 








r, 




o 




d 


x: 




PQ 




r. 






QJ 








t3 


CO 






CO 










S 


CO 












PQ 




o 


a 








• 






OO 


f^ 






ly 


ex 0) 


CO 




o 






• 






4-1 








< 








•H 


CO 




»> 




CO 






QJ 


>-. 






• 


e ^ 


• 




M 






CO 




»> 


•H 












•< 




4-1 






CO 




• 






rH 


4-1 






s 


03 nj 


m 


(/> 








. 






a 








pq' 








U 


r-i 




TJ 




PQ 






i-H 


•H 








ffi -u 




^ 






PQ 




CO 


CO 




< 








< 




QJ 


CO 




•H 








• 


O 


CO 






^ 


CO 


«> 


LU 












. 


O 








•s 








C 


4-J 




^ 




r^ 




< 


CJI 


U 






• 


;5 


>^ 


CO 






•^ 




PQ 


ffi 




PQ 




QJ 




PQ 




C 


•H 




o 




>^ 








QJ 






CO 


QJ 60 


■M 


o 








QJ 














4-1 








O 


a 




rH 




4-1 




PQ 


>^ 


> 






• 


IS 5-1 


•H 


PQ 






4-1 




»^ 


CO 




•> 




CO 




»• 




u 


CO 




fXH 




•H 






4-1 


•H 






PQ 


d 


CO 










CO 




QJ 


•- 




QJ 




4-) 




0) 






o 








CO 




•^ 


•H 


C 








M-l ^ 


U 


> 


•< 






4J 




00 x: 




00 




CO 




00 




14-1 


ffi 




M-l 




!-i 




QJ 


CO 


^ 






•^ 


o m 


0) 


CU 






CO 




QJ 


4-J 




QJ 








QJ 




o 






O 




QJ 




00 


5-1 








0) 


TJ 


> 


cr 


■U 










iH 


0) 




rH 




S-I 




rH 






rH 








> 




Q) 


QJ 


QJ 






4-1 


>^ a 


•H 


CO 






e 




iH 


,i3 




rH 




QJ 




rH 




>. 


QJ 




>% 




•H 




r-^ 


> 


4-1 






CO 


■P o 


C 


LU 


•p 






CO 




O 


CO 




o 




4-1 




O 




4-> 


CO 




4-1 




C 




rH 


•H 


CO 






4-1 


•H ^ 


P> 


CO 






-C 




U 


N 




o 




CO 




o 




•H 


5-1 




•H 




13 




o 


d 


4-1 






CO 


CO -U 




CO 








00 






•H 








13 








CO 


CO 




CO 








o 


^ 


CO 








U CO 


c 


c 






c 




c 


tH 




c 




QJ 




CO 




S-l 


M 




5-1 




C 














C 


(1) 


o 


o 






•H 




o 


W 




O 




00 




c 




QJ 






QJ 




o 




>^ 


cu 








o 


> 4J 


4J 


^ 


•1-J 






e 




4-1 






4-1 




T3 




QJ 




> 


x. 




> 




4-1 




u 


4_) 


d 






4J 


•H CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 




CO 


• 




CO 




•H 




QJ 




•H 


4-1 




•H 




CO 




5-1 


CO 


d 






CO 


C cd 


o 


< 


o 






5-1 




o 


4-J 




o 




^4 




d 




C 


Q) 




C 




o 




d 


4-1 


0) 






o 


1:3 w 


PQ 


pq 




CO 


pM 




PQ 


CO 




PQ 




PQ 




CD- 




t3 


PQ 




1=) 




PQ 


CO 


u 


CO 


Plh 




CO 


PQ 












0) 




































QJ 










0) 








o 






•H 
4-1 




































•H 










•H 
4-1 




CO 




LU 






•H 




C 






c 


















iH 








•H 










•H 




4-1 








I— 1 




O 






o 












00 






CO 








rH 








d 


rH 




^ 




Q. 






•H 




•H 






•H 




0) 




QJ 




c 






c 




QJ 




•H 








CO 


•H 




<: 








rJ3 




4-J 






4-1 




00 




00 




•H 






O 




00 




rP 








•H 


X3 








0) 






CO 




CO 






CO 




CO 




CO 




c 


!-i 




•H 




CO 




CO 








o 


CO 




ti 


C 






CO 




CJ 




QJ 


o 




d 




d 




5-1 


QJ 


0) 


4-J 




d 




CO 




4-1 




•H 


CO 




c 


cu 








•H 




d 




CO 







00 




00 




CO 


XI 


CO 


CO 




00 




•H 




CO 




CO 


•H 




CO 


4-J 








Q 




X) 




5-1 


T3 




c 




c 




Q) 


O 


^( 


CX 




c 




Q 




•H 




>.Q 




J 


i-l 






>. 






w 




D 


W 




CO 


C 


CO 


c 


hJ 


CO 


d 


d 


■M 


CO 


C 






00 




X 






-->- 


CO 




!-i 


^-1 


00 








IS 






hJ 


CO 


J 


CO 




QJ 


2: 


o 


CO 


h-:i 


CO 


OO 




O 




Ph 


OO 




(U m 


£>0 







CO 


C 


5-1 


rH 


5-1 




rH 


5-1 


1 


•H 


1 


•H 


00 H 




o 


•H 


"--. 


•H 


d 


s-l 


rH 






C 


5-1 


CJ 


!-i 




4-J 


4-1 


•H 


QJ 


CO 


QJ 


>H 


CO 


QJ 


x: 


a 


^ 


O 


C 


• 


rH 


o 


Ph X 


O 


•H 


QJ 


o 




rH 


•H 


QJ 


C (U 


0) 




O 


QJ 


C 


^ 


•H 


x; 


O 


•H 


x: 


o 


•H 


o 


•H 


•H 


Xi 


o 




CO 


o 


•H 


c 


rC 


X 




O 


C 


X 


Q) 'O 


-13 




QJ 


5-1 


5-1 


O 


O 


o 


O 


CJ 


o 


QJ 


c 


QJ 


C 


Md 


CO 


o 


• 


S-i 


QJ 


c 


S-l 


u 


CJ 




o 


5-1 


O 


•H CO 


C 




U 


O 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


CO 


^ 


QJ 


CO 


QJ 


•H 


QJ 


•H 


CO 


CO 


rC 


Q 


QJ 


QJ 


•H 


CO 


CO 


>. 




X 


CO 


CO 


O !-i 


•H 




•H 


QJ 


QJ 


Q) 


P- 


QJ 


o 


a 


QJ 


(X rH 


(X rH 


QJ 


•H 


o 




X 


PL, <-{ 


QJ 


0) 


CO 




o 


QJ 


QJ 


C/3 O 


t^ 




Q 


CO 


i-J 


H 


CO 


H 


CO 


CO 


H 


CO 


U 


CO 


O 


C^ 


Q 


CO 


hJ 


EH 


CO 


O 


hJ 


H 


Ph 




CO 


.4 


H 



d 


d 


•H 


>% 


o 


> 


S-l 


5-1 


•H 


x: 


QJ 


> 


4J 


> 




CO 




» 


^ 


r. 


S-l 




d 


0) 


rv 


CO 


4-J 


>^ 


e 


CO 


Q) 


sH 


;3 


x; 


QJ 


4J 


d 


4-1 


CO 


o 


CO 


QJ 


H 


^ 


:s 





. 






w 


QJ 
PQ 




. 










S <3 


, 


s 


QJ 

00 




1—1 


i-H 


CO 


u 






. 


. 


^ CO 
>^ -H 


s 


4-1 


XI 


U QJ 


•H 


QJ 


CO 


>. 






<: 


I-H 


QJ d 




QJ 


d 


d 


CO 


S-l 


•H 


o 




J 






x; -H 


•-3 QJ 


S-l 


1-2 


X: 'H 


CJ 


d 


a 


d 






CO 


!>^ 


O 00 


Ph 


CO 




+J 5-1 




CO 


•H 


CO 




4-1 


•H 


O 


4J 5-1 


d O 


00 


CO 


d QJ 


r^ 


J 


5-1 


S 




QJ 


> 


d 


•H -H 


•H ji: 


5-1 


rH 


Pi X 


•H 




4-1 




CO 


d 


rH 


CO 


Pi > 


> 


CO 


d 


4J 


CO 


r. 


CO 


•s 


•H 


CO 


>^ 


13 




(U r, 


S 


CO 


- CO 


CO 


Xl 


Ph 


CO 


5-1 


i-D 


CO 




. r. 


fc^ CO 




Ph 


rH O 


o 


QJ 




d 


M 






r^ 


<3 d 


•H 


r. 




rH 


5-1 


•H 


^ 


QJ 




•V 


r. 


o 


CO 


- o 


5-1 


r^ 


CU - 


00 


^H 


O 


rH 


r^ 


d 


CO 


d 


- > 


d d 


QJ 


g 


XI d 


QJ 


M-l 


•H 


CO 


rd 


QJ 


•H 


OO 


00 -H 


d QJ 


00 


Ph CO 


4-J 


4-1 


rH 


x 


00 


rH 


rH 


CO 


00 rH 


>^ rH 


iH 


o 


e w) 


d 


4-1 


rH 


CO 


•H 


rH 


rH 


Ph 


CO rH 


iH CO 


O 


5-1 


CO d 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


4-1 d 


fe o 


PQ 


PQ 




PCH 


CJ 


i^ 


t^ 


hJ 


s 


Ph 


Ph 


CO CO 



125 



in in 

ON ON 



o o 


, 1 


m \D 


r~^ ^ 


r-^ 


r-. vD 


ON ON 


ON 


a^ a^ 











. 








< 










na 


















Q 






TS 












w 
























w 


S 




























X 


















s 


















d^ 






4 


B 




























« 






p^ 


CO 










cu . 


















o 






4J 


X 










4-1 ID 


















T3 






•H 


00 








• 


CO W 


















CO 






CO 


C 








nd 


4-1 












• 






M 






»-4 


•H 








w 


CO 2 








> 




2 






O 






CU 


a 


















CO 










•H 






> 


CO 








s 


>-i " 










• 


OS 






O 






•H 


^ 










0) (U 




CO 




J 


•o 








O 






d 


fc 








r> 


4-1 00 










U 


« 












1=3 






. 




QJ 


CO cu 




2 




s 


• 


OX) 






c 








•^ 




•n 




4_J 


(U rH 










S 


c 






u 






c 






. w 




CO 


X -H 




«^ 




r. 




•H 






QJ 






o 


PQ 




CO • 




4-1 


CJ o 




5-1 




QJ 


•> 


CO 






■M 












• S 




CO 


u 




CU 




00 


(U 


Vi 






CO 






CO 


< 




2 










4-1 




QJ 


00 


3 






(U 






o 










d 


CO d 




(0 




>-H 


(U 


2 






:2 






CQ 


•V 




.. cu 




o 


(U o 




:3 




rH 


I— 1 
















CO 




cu 4-1 




4-1 


:s ^ 




cu 




o 


I— 1 


U-l 






in 






•V 


B 




4-1 CT3 




CO 


x 




oc 




CJ 


o 


O 






• 






• 


iH 




CO -U 




o 


- 




Xl 






u 








T3 






< 


w 




4-» CO 




PQ 


• PQ 




•H 




CO 


c 


iH 
O 


LU 




W 






PQ 


0) 




CO 

d 




^ 


< 




5-1 

PQ 




d 
o 


o 


O 


o 




s 








x; 




d o 




CJ 


PQ* " 








e • 


■M 


^ 










>s 


4-1 




O 4-1 




•H 


PQ 




«. 




e CO 


CO 


o 


z 




>> 






00 






4J CO 




CO 


r. . 








•H 


o 


CO 










u 


14-1 




CO o 




d 


-^ < 




CO 




CO PQ 


PQ 






CO 






3 


O 




O PQ 




S 


S-I 




• 








I— 1 


< 










^ 






PQ 






o - 




PQ 




•s •s 


»> 


CO 




CQ 






CO 


>> 




•^ 




PQ 


>-' >. 








• • 


• 


iJ 


o 










4-J 


t3 




r. • 






u 




r. 




PQ CO 


CO 


•H 




•> 






4-1 


CO 




• CO 




>^ 


15 CO 




P^ 




• CO 


• 


a 


^^B 




>^ 






•H 


hJ 




CO • 




4J 


CU d 


< 


4-1 




< CO 


eQ 


CO 

o 


3 




•H 






Ph 


V^ 




• PQ 
PQ 




•H 
CO 


Z -H 


•H 
CO 




s 


•« 


PC 


CD 




CO 






<4-l 


D 




r. 




V-i 


UH CU 


Q 


5h 




QJ MH 


0) 


J>^ 




cu 






O 


O 




- d 
cu u 




> 


O CO 


QJ 

> 




00 o 
QJ 


CO 


■Ul 


1 




> 






>^U^ 




4-1 QJ 




•H 


>. CO 


LU 


•H 




rH >. 


4J 


•H 






•H 






4-1 


o 




CO 4-1 




d 


4J - 


d 




rH 4-1 


CO 


U 


CO 










•H 

CO 


a; 




4-1 CO 
CO CO 




13 


•H d 

CO ^ 


S 


D 




O -H 
CJ CO 


c 


c 


LU 










>-l 


oo 




OJ 




d 


u o 




d 




5h 


o 


o 




CO 






cu 


0) 




B rC 




o 


cu '-) 


? 


o 




CO QJ 


u 


4-1 


O 




4J 






> 


i-H 




0) 4-1 




4-1 


> 






CU > 


CD 


CO 




M-l 






•H 


, — 1 




.-H 5-1 




CO 


•H 


CC 


CO 




4-1 -H 


o 


o 


w^mm 




d 






d 


o 




CO O 




o 


d 4-1 


o 




CO d 




PQ 


> 




H 






ZD 


CJ 




CO Z 




pa 


IZD CO 


< 

cc 

CD 


PQ 




PQ pi 


•H 
•U 




cc 






















^_^ 








•H 
iH 




UJ 






^^ 


'^ 


^_^ 


^ 




^ /— V 


^ 




rH '^ 








J3 




(/> 






CO 


d: 


CO 


re 




CO • 
• CO 


cu 
t— 1 




CU 3: 
cu . 








to 

CO 


Q) 


_J 




4-1 
CO 


3: 


•-5 


p:: 








CO 
Q 




§^ 


^ 








•H 


It) 


< 




•H 




























O 


U 




M 










I-H 


!-i 


r. 
















3 




O 


>, 


>, 


V4 


>-( 


CO 


o u 


>-l 


I-H 


i-> yi 






>. 




^ 


z 


^^" 


pH 


I— t 


S-i 


}-i 


o 


o 


d 


--H O 


o 


CO 


o o 




>-i 


Vh 


4«i 


C !- 




o 


CO 


O 


CO 


CO 


rH 


I— ( 


o 


0) <-t 


I-H 


•H 


r-\ rH 




o 


CO 


a 


•r-^ O 


^H 


o 


4^ 


4J 


4_| 


CU 


(U 


•H 


CO cu 


CU 


}-l 


QJ cu 




4-1 


4-1 


o 


C ^ 


G 


LU 


•H 


a 


OJ 


(U 


CO 


c/. 


4-1 


d CO 


CO 


o 


CO CO 




o 


QJ 


T-\ 


>-i o 


O 


C 


>% 


u 


(-1 


d 


d 


CO 


d d 


d 


e 


d d 




QJ 


5h 


QJ QJ 


P3 TO 


x. 


0. 


•H 


CO 


u 


a 


d 


d 


o 


o d 


d 


<u 


d d 




5-1 


CJ 


QJ rH 


(U oj 


U 


rH 


p-> 


0) 


cu 


o 


o 


o 


CJ o 


o 


s 


o o 




•H 


QJ 


x: CO 

5 Q 


^ H 


cn 


CO 


C-) 




CO 


CO 


o 


CJ 


> 


o 


u 




CJ CJ 




O 


CO 



5-1 




















o 




. 
















r 




■^ 








pJ 


CJ 






w 




>^ 




• 


. 






• 


• 




2 


^ 


. 


CiJ 


pH 


to 


e 


o 


fx. 


d 




u 


CO 






QJ 


CO 






CO 


d 


o 




CO 


4-1 


B 


•H 


CO 


d 


I— 1 


CO 


^4 


r-t 


•H 


5-1 


CO 


rH 


U 


•H 


< 


•H 


o 


O 


O 


QJ 


•-) 


t-H 


X 


4-1 




1— 1 


Q 


u 


hJ 


X 




•H 


QJ 


5-1 


•. 


rH 




CO 




O 


•. 


:s 


P 


JO 


CO 


•H 


•. 


CJ 


•. 


Pi 


p^ 








00 


J 


N 




4-1 




X 


r. 


^ 




d 




4-1 


^ 


5-. 


r. 


4-1 


d 


U 


#> 


•H 


r. 


r-t 


QJ 


OJ 


x: 


5-1 


CO 


QJ 


CO 


4-J 


j; 


d 


d 


Xi 


o 


CO 


X 


d 


^ 


CO 


o 


JZ 


•H 


B 


d 


CJ 


QJ 


4-1 


rH 


CO 


01 


'J 


CO 


CO 


t^. 


o 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


X. 


^ 


CO 


CQ 


,-J 


hJ 




s 


p^ 


CO 



nH 


•H 


5-1 


O 


QJ 


d 


CO 


►-3 


•H 


d 


XI 




d 


w 


U 


•V 


CO 




CO 


QJ 


o 


#. 


PQ 


•H 




d 




^3 


». 


CO 


•^ 


d 


d 


d 


>^ 


QJ 


CO 


d 


>H 


t^ 


oo 


QJ 


CO 


o 


o 


U 


0) 


CO 


K 


PQ 


hJ 


S 



126 



iH CN 0> 
r^ vD vO 
CT\ 0\ G^ 



cn <t <f <r) ■^ 
r--, r--. r-- r^ r-. 
0^ O^ 0^ On Q^ 





<: 




PQ 




„ 


, 


c 


tJ 


•H 


w 


w 




c 


^ s 


o 




o 


PQ „ 


m 




•H 


<d c/3 


^ 


•> pq 


<+-! 


(U 


o 


&0 •> 




QJ g 


>. 


rH C« 


4J 


-H ^ 


•H 


O 60 


cn 


U C 


5-1 


•H 


0) 


oj e 


> 


a CO 


•H 


o u 


c 


m fe 


pi 



00 o 
•H O 

o 

!-< CO 

O 

•H x: 
c M 



CO 
LU 
O 



< 



o 

LU 

H 

>- 

cr 

< 



UJ 

o 

< 
a: 

LU 

X 

o 

< 

LU 



O bO 
O -H 

O 

o 

00 (=1 
•H d 
K "-5 



c 


c 


c 


c 


C 


CU 


0) 


0) 


QJ 


QJ 


4-1 


4J 


4-1 


4-1 


U 


i-t 


U 


i-l 


!-i 


U 


Clj 


03 


03 


cfl 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


!-j 


5-1 


U 


t-i 


M 


0) 


dJ 


0) 


QJ 


QJ 


-o 


MS 


XI 


T3 


T3 


c 


C 


c 


C 


C 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


^ 


t^ 


^ 


rH 


r-) 


^ 


tH 


U 


rt 


cd 


O 


03 


o 


•H 


•H 


O 


•H 


T— 1 


!-( 


5-1 


M 


5-1 


QJ 




O 


QJ 


O 


0) 


g 


e 


QJ 


e 


^ 


0) 


0) 


X 


Q) 



5-( 


QJ 




03 


O 




,C 


c 


• 


O 


03 


O 


•H 


4-) 




Pi 


Cfl 


c 




c 


C 


»^ 


o 


<! 


c 


u 


o 


c 




*-) 


03 


>v 






00 


^ 


QJ 


03 


03 


a 


XI 


^ 


•H 


rCl 


>^ 


QJ 


03 


O 


Pi 


C/2 


C/3 



•H QJ 

XI C 

4-1 U 

c o 
o 

>. 03 

T3 a 

C -H 

03 > 

rH O 

pq S 





Q 


U 


u 


03 






XI 


•H 


CO 


03 


C 


O 


• 5-4 


O 


03 


•H 


U 03 


•H 


X 


5-4 


X 


C 


QJ 


4-1 


03 H 


O 


>H 


03 


C 03 


5-4 


<: 


Ph 


C P5 


QJ 






<: 


> 


•s 


». 






c 


OD 


r. >, 


r, 


o 


5-1 


m X 


c 


Cfl 


QJ 


C ^ 


o 


^i 


■XJ 


•H 5-< 


X 


QJ 


C 


00 0) 


03 


/^ 


03 


OO O 


s 


O 


t-H 


•H O 


a 


•H 



127 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



Avery, Dorothy E. 
*Holland, Lorraine G. 

Catenacci, Rita 
*Collins, Marsha A. 

Dick, Doris R. 

Flynn, Janet M. 

Grover, Mildred H. 
*Haxton, Janet M. 

Morgan, Mary 
*Howard, Ruth D. 

Hutt, Mary Rita A. 

Ingraham, Dorothy M. 

Kuhlman, Deborah L. 
*Leslie, Patricia E. 

O'Donnell, Lenora M. 

Oglesby, Loretta A. 

Papsis, Gloria 

Petersen, Leonora M. 
*Simonaitis , Ann H. 

Sloan, Marjorie 
*Smith, Arlene F. 

Smith, Jean M. 

Stewart, Alice L. 

Szylkonis, Irene F. 
*Thayer, E. Ruth 



School Lunch Director 

Clerk 

Memorial 

Junior High 

Junior High 

Junior High (Mgr.) 

Dale Street (Mgr.) 

Dale Street-Aide 

Wheelock (Mgr.) 

Junior High 

High School 

Wheelock 

Junior High 

Dale Street 

Dale Street 

High School 

Wheelock 

Wheelock 

High School 

Memorial (Mgr.) 

High School 

Dale Street 

High School (Mgr.) 

Junior High 

Memorial 



CUSTODIANS 



Pritoni, Harold F. 
Boudreau, Joseph I. 
Boudreau, William F. 
Capocci, William L. 
DiNardo, John J. 
Giard, Arnold U. 
Grover, John T. 
Hallowell, Vincent D. 
Hennahane, Micnael V. 
Kilmer, Howard L. 
LaPlante, Thomas M. 
McCormack, John D. 
Motes, Carlis E. 
Mott, Harold S. 
Suereth, Eric T. 
Sweet, Reginald 0. 
Timmerman, Joseph W. 
Vienot, Charles G. 
Walls, Thomas R. 
Wilson, Daniel G. 



Director of Buildings and Grounds 
Groundskeeper 
Wheelock 
Dale Street 
Groundskeeper 
Junior High 
Maintenance 
Wheelock 
High School 
High School 
Junior High 
Memorial 
Dale 

Memorial 
Groundskeeper 
Junior High 
High School 
Maintenance 
Wheelock 
Dale Street 



128 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



New Personnel 



Appointment Effective 



ADMINISTRATION 



Cresto, Robert, Superintendent 
Devereau, Russell A. , Business Manager 



November 
July 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Mickles, Susanne 
Page, Susan 
*Schmitt, Jean 
Thonet, Kathleen 
Wakely, Norma 



September 
September 
September 
September 
November 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Camara , Raymond 
DeSorgher, Richard 
Engdahl, Nancy 

*Lola, Linda 
Murray, Ann 
Sassone, Richard 

*Vasaturo, Margaret 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



DALE STREET 



*Iverson, Georganne 
Kalweit, Regina 
Sherbs, Janet 



September 
September 
September 



129 



WHEELOCK 



Abernethy, Miriam September 



MEMORIAL 



Fitzpatrick, Richard (Principal) September 

Nickerson, Alexandra (Aide) September 



SPECIAL SERVICES 

*Campbell, Ruth September 



CAFETERIA 



*Harris, Muriel (Clerk) February 

*Haxton, Janet (Aide) October 

*Holland, Lorraine (Clerk) October 

*Iverson, Georgann (Aide) September 



CUSTODIANS 



Vienot, Charles September 

Wilson, Daniel September 



Part Time Employees 



130 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 



Burke, Maura 
Hunter, Robert 
Kryzanek, Carol 
Look, Suzanne 
McDermott, Janet 
Torem, Esther 



November 

September 

November 

December 

September 

September 



TERMINATIONS 



ADMINISTRATION 



Morris, James 
Pulsifer, Bruce 



December 
December 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Lloyd, Linda 
Modica, Barbara 
Schmitt, Jean 



May 

September 

October 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Camara, Raymond 
Ekstrom, John 
Feeney, Daniel 
Graham, Karen 
lonson, Martha 
Nelson, Carol 
Sauer, John 



December 
June 
August 
June 
June 
August 
June 



DALE STREET 



Sauer, Elizabeth 



June 



131 



MEMORIAL 



Devereau, Russell A. (Principal) 
Mayland, Catherine (Aide) 



July 
June 



WHEELOCK 



Schneider, Paulette 



July 
January 



SPECIAL SERVICES 



Barrett, Joan 



July 



CAFETERIA 



Boulter, Jean 
*Hallett, Elaine (Clerk) 
*Harris, Muriel (Clerk) 

Wenz, Shirley 



August 

January 

June 

August 



CUSTODIANS 



Bridges, Frank 
Brock, James 



June 
July 



* Part time employee 



132 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 
Ten Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 
67-68 68-69 69-70 70-71 71-72 72-73 73-74 74-75 



75-76 76-77 



SPED 


(10) 


10 


12 


14 


16 


12 


11 


17 


13 


16 


Kg. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


181 


183 


187 


174 


1 


228 


243 


235 


229 


247 


221 


203 


201 


185 


194 


2 


228 


227 


235 


220 


223 


240 


212 


205 


192 


192 


3 


210 


249 


233 


233 


232 


224 


218 


218 


211 


192 


4 


195 


225 


259 


235 


238 


246 


209 


215 


212 


208 


5 


209 


204 


237 


248 


236 


249 


251 


210 


221 


216 


6 


193 


219 


222 


236 


253 


237 


247 


253 


225 


226 


7 


189 


197 


228 


227 


244 


251 


230 


250 


255 


232 


8 


179 


188 


210 


234 


236 


248 


242 


227 


250 


245 


9 


165 


178 


194 


209 


240 


235 


233 


235 


219 


240 


10 


145 


160 


177 


201 


207 


232 


231 


220 


230 


218 


11 


115 


148 


172 


165 


193 


203 


221 


227 


212 


226 


12 


113 


116 


155 


169 


149 


183 


188 


207 


215 


205 



Totals 2179 2364 2569 2620 2714 2781 2877 



2868 2827 



2784 



Commentary: 

The 1976-77 incoming first grade was 21 students smaller than the 
outgoing graduating class of the previous year 1975-76. The Kindergarten 
program in its fourth year enrolled 174 pupils compared with 187, 183, and 181 
in previous years. The overall enrollment in 1976-77 decreased by 43 
students over the previous year's decline of 41 students. 

The overall outlook appears to be one of gradually decreasing 
enrollments in the next few years. In addition to the number of students 
who will enroll at the Tri-County Vocational-Technical School in the next 
three years (Medfield's total allocated spaces by 1979-80 will be 156), 
continued declining enrollment is expected at the Kindergarten level for the 
next couple of years. The reason for the declines, past and immediate future, 
appears to be related to the fewer number of resident births and single- 
family housing, both of which have occurred at lower rates in the seventies 
than in the sixties. However, the upswing in the issuance of single-family 
permits in 1976, the issuance of permits for multi-family construction and 
the fact that the birth rate, according to State statistics, appears to be 
stabilizing suggests that these factors bear close watching in the next few 
years. 

SPECIAL FUNDING 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Public Law 
89-10, Title I funded $11,554 for a summer school program held at the Dale 
Street School involving primarily students from the Memorial and Dale Street 
Schools with a few from Wheelock School. The growing Federal emphasis in 
these programs is to provide relatively large sums of money for relatively 
few children in order to make significant educational gains for those in 
need - especially at the pre-school and primary grade levels. Children in 



133 



Grades 1 through 5 were served by this project. The Wheelock attendance 
area as a whole was again ruled ineligible as a primary target group. The 
past summer was the last summer program to be held under Title I. In the 
future all monies will be spent during the school year. This will be done at 
the request of both our State Department of Education and the U.S. Office of 
Education. The rationale behind this change is that the small amount of 
money allotted to Medfield can be more effectively used during the school 
year. 

A small Title I Year-round program has been funded using volunteer 
mothers as tutors at two of our elementary schools. A total of $500 in 
Federal funds have been used to purchase materials to meet the instructional 
needs of students. 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title II, funded over 
$2,663 as a continuation of the help that libraries have received in the 
purchase of materials since 1965. This is the last year that these Title II 
monies will be available. 

Under Title III (NDEA) the Medfield Public Schools received reim- 
bursements in the amount of $1,500 for previously approved Reading projects. 
Additional reimbursements for reading and science projects will be received 
during 1977 for projects already approved. 

A new grant of money under Title IV, Part B of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act was received in the amount of $1,355. This Title IV, 
Part B allocation is as a result of the direct merger of the Title II ESEA 
Library and the Title III NDEA programs. This grant was used for audio- 
visual equipment at the Secondary level to supplement our normal fundings. 

Under the Vocational Education Act the Federal government allotted a 
grant of $17,300 to be used in our Junior High School Industrial Arts 
department to up-grade their curriculum. Power technology equipment to 
introduce two new projects - "Power Technology" and "The World of Construc- 
tion" - was purchased, and the Industrial Arts rooms were renovated with 
these funds, also, to accommodate the labs for these new programs. 



The administrative changes created by the School Committee will have 
the Superintendent of Schools actively involved in the evaluation, modifica- 
tion and development of curriculum and with the overall responsibility for 
the effective operation of the schools through policy development of the 
School Committee. Business affairs, including transportation, building and 
grounds, food services and purchasing, will be the responsibility of 
Russell Devereau, Business Manager. 

The retirement of James Morris, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, 
will be a void in that he has served the Medfield Schools for twenty-two 
years. I am indebted to him for his assistance in the transition of the 
Central Administration. 

One of my first duties was the implementation of a budget request 
system for the 1977-78 school year which specifically and concisely explains 
the monetary requests by category and with supportive information to justify 
the need of the school system. 



134 



All Administrators and Curriculum Coordinators are developing 
short and long term goals and objectives as a means toward efficient program 
planning for the future. Joining the administrative staff this year was 
Richard Fitzpatrick who assumed the position of Principal of the Memorial 
School. 

Establishing effective communication with the community at large is 
another prime objective. To begin this process, a Community Advisory Council 
to the Superintendent, comprised of parents and business persons, has been 
established and will begin meeting in January. 

A committee is actively working toward the recommendation of system- 
atic standards for measuring the educational achievement of our students in 
relation to the curriculum offered. My emphasis will also be to improve 
instruction to the extent that our high school students will continue to 
improve performance on College Entrance Examination Board tests. An 
innovation to this end is the School Committee's approval for an Advanced 
Placement Science course (college level) for the next school year for those 
students who have displayed proficiency in the field and seek the challenge 
this course will offer. A committee comprised of school staff and community 
volunteers is also developing recommendations for a program in the near 
future that will provide services to the academic and creatively talented 
students. 

A systematic program for the development of writing skills through- 
out the grades is currently in progress and will be implemented throughout 
all curriculum areas for consistency and uniformity of expectations. 

The teaching staff is continually seeking improved methods for 
classroom instruction. The Inservice educational days have proved to be 
effective in establishing curriculum sequences, equalization of educational 
opportunities in all schools, and this important program will continue to 
focus on instructional improvements. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

All that the schools have accomplished would not have been possible 
without the support of the administrators and staff and of the many school 
volunteers who assist in the classrooms and in other supportive ways. We 
are also indebted for the contributions of parent associations, civic 
organizations. Town offices. Corning, local businesses and all individuals 
and groups who have been of service to our schools. Our gratitude is also 
expressed to the School Planning and Building Committee for its work in 
providing the new Science labs at the high school and to the Army Corps of 
Engineers for the construction of playing fields at Wheelock, Memorial and 
the Senior High Schools, and the survey of the baseball diamond at the 
Junior High School. 



135 



I pledge my continuing efforts for quality education to the 
Medfield School Committee and for the confidence it has expressed in electing 
me to the superintendency . The dedication and contributions to the education 
of the children in Medfield by the School Committee is commendable. I look 
forward to cooperating with Town officials and residents so we can continue 
to realize a mutual effort in assisting our young people to aspire and 
realize career goals they will set for themselves. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rob2MX C^QJitO 

Superintendent of Schools 




Mr. Robert Cresto, Superintendent of Schools. 



136 



REPORT OF THE 
MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit the Memorial School annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 1976. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Our enrollment of 392 pupils shows a slight decline from the previous 
year. This decrease, a result of a smaller kindergarten class, has been 
offset by a large first grade. (The decrease has not affected the pupil- 
teacher ratio which remains the same as last year, 22 to 1. The pupil- 
teacher ratio at the kindergarten level is currently 17 to 1.) 

Except for two positions created by leaves of absence, the entire 
experienced staff has remained at the Memorial School. 

PROGRAMS 

The Memorial School I.M.C. instituted a comprehensive schedule to 
provide all pupils with an opportunity to become more familiar with the 
materials available through the I.M.C, as well as develop basic skills in 
library usage. 

The Bicentennial float was the culminating activity of a unit of study 
on Medfield History completed by two of our first grade classes. The parents 
of the children worked with the children to construct a large birthday cake 
from egg cartons. The response from the community indicated that the entire 
activity was a hugh success. 

Through the cooperative efforts of the Memorial School staff, existing 
programs are being reviewed in an attempt to examine alternative approaches 
to instruction. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

The annual October Open House was an overwhelming success as pupils 
guided parents and friends through the school and introduced their families 
to their teachers. Outlines dealing with current materials and subject- 
matter content were made available for all visitors. In addition, the 
building contained a variety of examples of the childrens ' classroom 
activities . 

Over 400 parent conferences were held during the November reporting 
period. The interest and enthusiasm, as well as the number of fathers and 
mothers that attended, demonstrates the desirability of this personal 
evaluation technique. 

Visitors toured the Memorial School facility and observed classroom 
instruction during American Education Week. Displays and informative 



137 



materials were placed throughout the building to give all parents an 
opportunity to review the materials currently used by their children at 
school . 

In an effort to continue to improve home-school communications, a 
Memorial School Newsletter was established. In addition, information 
regarding programs and activities of interest was furnished for publication 
in the local press. 

Through the sustained efforts of the Memorial School staff, and with 
the continued encouragement of the Superintendent, we look to continued 
growth in our educational programs. We extend our appreciation to the 
School Committee, Central Office staff, parents and school volunteers for 
their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RiahoAd M. fiZzpatnA-dk 

Principal 




Memorial School students Rhonda Gottsche, Heather Zahner and Cindy Powers do 
some sentence building in the resource room. 



138 







^' 



f 



^*?^l\ Vx 



^^^ Vx^X^# 



.^> 



4-1 C 

c o 

CO 'H 
U 4J 
03 Cti 

a >-i 
.o 

CD d) 

^ .-H 

■U 0) 

O 

CO 
Q) ^ 

Xi -H 
•H PQ 

4-1 x: 

C 4-1 
O LT) 

a cN ' 



> ,,'f 

«.>^ 




o - 

-H 13 

U-l ^ 
CD 

^ -H 

O M-J 

O 13 

^ QJ 

O S 

CO 

o 



!-i o 

o o 

0) o 



139 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, it is my pleasure to submit my 
fourteenth Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

PROGRAMS 

During our country's two-hundredth birthday celebration all regular 
curricula programs were enhanced by the infusion of related Bicentennial 
information and activities. Included in our observances were the making of 
a Bicentennial Music Quilt by a group of twenty-six grade six students, a 
daily Bicentennial Minute reporting on a historical happening of two hundred 
years ago, and classroom plays depicting Colonial America. 

Within a helpful and supportive environment, our program of studies and 
staff continued to emphasize the development and improvement of the knowledge 

and learning skills of each student. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Our enrollment has been basically stable this year. At present there 
are four students less then December 31, 1975. There was an increase of 
17 pupils from January 1, 1976, to June 23, 1976. One staff member retired 
in June and the vacancy was filled. The staff was reduced by 4/5 of a 
teacher in Physical Education for September, 1976. Two Cafeteria Aides were 
hired for one and one-half hours per day for four days to allow teachers to 
supervise activity periods. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 

1. Fire drills were conducted in May, September, and October. 

The average time for evacuation was one minute, sixteen seconds. 

2. Participation in National Assessment of Educational Progress. 

3. Curriculum oriented Field Trip for each grade. 

4. There were ten major school assemblies for the children during 
the year. 

5. The Annual Art and Music Festival was held in May. 

6. Intramural activities for boys and girls were offered throughout 
the year. 

7. Grade six students experienced the "Outdoor Classroom" for one 
week at Ponkapoag in Canton this Fall. 



140 



8. The band and chorus performed for the students of the Memorial 
School. 

9. Separate Field Days were held for grades four, five, and six. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

We welcome the community's participation in the Dale Street School's 
educational program. I wish to thank the many parents and friends who have 
voluntarily given their time and effort to broaden the learning experiences o 
of the children. Some examples of this community and school cooperation are: 

1. Field Trip chaperones. 

2. Refreshments for Open House. 

3. Community speakers on a variety of subjects in different curricula 
areas. 

4. Six-week Baby-Sitting course offered by parents for grade six 
students. 

5. Parent assistance in IMC. 

6. Parent organization and supervision of the Bookmobile. 

7. Parent tutors in Reading. 

8. Parents Advisory Council to the Principal. 

9. Parents of sixth grade students who participated in fund-raising 
activities for Ponkapoag. 

10. Individual grade-level Open House. 

11. Distribution of over four hundred seedlings for planting in 
Medfield courtesy of Mr. Ellis Allen. 

I wish to thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, the Faculty, and the citizens of Medfield for their cooperation 
and assistance during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MUan K. BeZchoA 

Principal 




Karen Morgan, Eric Heyer, Kathleen Good, Michael St. Germain, Michael Noon. 
Louis Reinemann with Bicentennial quilt made by Dale Street students. 

141 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The eighth annual report is being submitted from the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1976. To commemorate the 
Bicentennial and Medfield's 325th Birthday, the Wheelock faculty scheduled a 
series of events and activities that culminated with a Pioneer Day on 
June 6th. A re-enactment of a typical school day in 1876 and an Early 
American Crafts Fair constituted this memorable event. Teachers and students 
dressed authentically and participated in the learning adventures of that 
period. Children were taught some of the folkcrafts of our country during 
scheduled workshops. The articles that were produced by each class were 
included in the Crafts Fair which was attended by 600 people from the 
community. Afternoon festivities were further enhanced by a special perfor- 
mance of the High School Band. The proceeds of this event were utilized to 
beautify the center courtyard. 



oo 



^^^ 




The faculty of the Ralph Wheelock School participating in Pioneer Day held on 
June 4, 1976. 

At the fourth grade level we implemented an organizational structure 
that is similar to third grade. A team of 4th grade teachers is responsible 
for teaching only 4th grade students. Our goals for this program are as 
follows: 

1. To help children identify more readily with a teacher who works 
with them for longer periods of time. 

2. To give teachers an opportunity to have a better understanding of 
each child's needs. 



142 



3. To enable teachers to integrate the Language Arts Skills program 
with other academic areas. 

A. To provide time during the school day for a relaxed recess 
activity period. 

5. To enhance the ability to give children individual help at any time 
during the school day. 

This program is being initiated on a one year basis with an evaluative 
process to determine its continuance in the future. 

"Discussion Nights" were held periodically to provide parents with 
specific information regarding curriculum areas and to answer questions 
concerning any aspect of the total school situation. These meetings were 
open to parents of all grade levels. Coordinators and teachers provided 
valuable input to the discussion, and parents offered good ideas and 
suggestions relating to school programs. In our continuing efforts to 
establish communication between school and home, we implemented "Open House" 
Programs, Parent Conferences, Classrooms and School Newsletters, and 
Progress Reports. 

Our Tutorial Program at ^^eelock contributes effectively to the total 
school program. Tutors have worked with groups of students in enrichment 
activities in Grades 1-5 benefiting approximately 16 children in the past 
year. We are hoping to expand the program in the near future. Reinforce- 
ment learning activities are also provided by tutors to children either 
individually or in small groups. These children number about 30. Guidance 
has incorporated discussion groups for students on a volunteer basis. The 
goal of this program is to foster an understanding of human behavior, 
feelings, a sense of values, responsibilities, decision-making skills and 
career awareness. With individual, group counselling, and developmental 
guidance programs, guidance is available to all students. 

The Study Skills Program at the intermediate level (grades 4-6) 
continues to give students an opportunity to reinforce skills previously 
learned in other subject areas. Once a week students engage in activities 
such as outlining, utilizing the dictionary, beginning research reports, 
and the like. These exercises are conducted by the classroom teacher during 
an assigned study. During this period the teacher checks each child's work 
and allows students who are proficient in certain areas to help other pupils 
who need this reinforcement. 

Chorus periods are scheduled for grades 4-6 during the school day. At 
this writing, two hundred students are participating. 

The Language Arts block at the intermediate level continues to provide 
a greater continuity and application of fundamental skills to all areas of 
Reading and English. 

Basic skills in Mathematics is continually being stressed at all levels, 
Reinforcement of concepts and extra help is given during assigned study 
periods in grades 5 and 6. 



143 



Gratitude is extended to the Central Office Administration and School 
Committee for their support and cooperation. A special note of appreciation 
to the faculty at Wheelock who sincerely and enthusiastically have provided 
for the students' needs. We are also grateful for the involvement of 
coordinators, all other school personnel, volunteers, and parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

fn.ank J. Ho{^{iman 

Principal 




Robert Hatfield's work gets look of approval from 5th grade teacher, Janice 
Olson at Wheelock School. 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

With pleasure, I am submitting the Annual Report for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

Our September enrollment was 730 students distributed over three grade 
levels as follows: 

Grade seven 233; grade eight 246; grade nine 240; and 11 SPED students. 



144 



As part of our celebration of America's birthday, our Seventh and 
Eighth grade Social Science classes held a Bicentennial Fair at which 
student projects were displayed. Project themes included Medfield's history, 
Westward Expansion, Economic growth, social changes through our history, and 
Famous Americans. Prizes in the form of Medfield's Bicentennial Medal were 
awarded to the outstanding publicly displayed projects. 

In April our school received a grant from the Department of Education in 
the area of occupational and career education. This grant provided us with 
two new programs in our Industrial Arts curriculum - Power Technology at 
grade 9 and World of Construction at grades 7 and 8. 

New staff members to our school replacing resigned or retired members 
include Miss Anne Murray and Mr. Richard Sassone in Math, Mrs. Margaret 
Vasaturo and Mr. Richard DeSorgher in Social Science, Mrs. Linda Lola in 
Reading, Mrs. Bonnie Totman in Physical Education, Mrs. Nancy Engdahl in 
Language Arts, Mrs. Dorothy Burstein in Science, and Mr. Ray Camara in 
Business Education. 

A Parent Advisory Council was established and a Newsletter was developed. 
Presently a parent-student handbook is being developed for use in the 1977-78 
academic year. 

In addition, the PAC has helped to organize a series of guest speaker 
presentations the first of which was held in November. Dr. Maurice 
Vanderpol spoke on the early adolescent. 

The Student Council again held a very successful fund raising activity 
and in December presented poinsettia plants to the new residents of Tilden 
Village, Medfield's Housing Authority complex adjacent to the Junior High 
School. 

Efforts have been made to provide proper orientation for the Tri-County 
Vocational School program which will be available to next year's ninth and 
tenth grade students. Mr. Tim Rioux, Pupil Personnel Director of Tri- 
County has presented a number of orientation programs to our students and 
parents throughout the fall. 

I thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, parents, faculty 
and school personnel for their continued assistance and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jo/ne^ W. O'CoYiYiaZt 

Principal 



145 



nLLif 




Junior High librarian, Connie Sabbag, shows helper Barbara Secrist how to 
use the card file. 



REPORT OF THE 
AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our annual 
report for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

The official enrollment for the High School this year was 649. There 
were 214 graduates in the Class of 1976. Of these, 49% went on to a four 
year college; 16% to a two year college; 2% to other post high school 
institutions of high education; 2% joined the Armed Services and 31% entered 
the world of work. 

The faculty of our school consists of 54 certified professionals. 
Advanced degrees are held by 65% of the staff. 

During this past year we have worked closely with our Coordinators, 
Department Heads and Team Leaders in order to improve our curriculum 
offerings. We have introduced the following new courses: 

English Department Advanced Composition 

Social Studies Department. . . .Futuristics 

Western Civilization 

Business Department Business English 

Mathematics Department World of Mathematics 

Art Department Studio Class 



146 



We are proud of our new laboratory additions to the Science Department, 
With a new chemistry and physics laboratory, we are better able to teach 
these two laboratory courses effectively. 




New Science Laboratory at the High School has offered students James Connor, 
Keith Ulrich, Bill Dhmitri new experiences such as using the electrostatic 
generator. 



This is the first year that we are requiring all students to take a 
minimum of one course in literature, one course in composition, and one 
course in speech or drama, during their high school career. We are also 
stressing reading, writing, speaking and listening in each of our English 
courses. 

Many of our students participated in the "Beautif ication Project" which 
was sponsored by the Student Council. Students contributed by planting trees 
and shrubs on the campus grounds, by building and installing new benches in 
the outside commons, and by hanging paintings on the walls of the auditorium, 
cafeteria and corridors. 

During this Bicentennial year many of our high school students 
participated in several of the Town-sponsored activities. 

Our Student/Faculty /Parent Advisory Committee, the Faculty Executive 
Board and the Academic Standards Committee have been very active during this 
past year. These committees have been responsible for helping to improve our 
school in many ways. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent, the Assistant Superintendent, the Business 
Manager, and the many parent groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T(U^o6 P. fAlZedeA 
Principal 



147 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS of 1976 



SUNDAY, JUNE 6, 1976 4:00 P.M. 

PROGRAM 

Processional Class of 1976 

Medfield High School Band 
Douglas Godfrey, Director 

MARSHALL S 
Elizabeth Ann Alexander Jeffrey Allan Lavanier 

Invocation The Reverend David H. Flanders 

The National Anthem Medfield High School Band 

Welcome Peter J. Moynihan, President, Class of 1976 

Honor Essays 

Stephen Eric Moffatt Edwin James Hilpert, Jr. 

Selections by the Glee Club and Special Chorus 

Presentation of Class Gift James W. Sullivan 

Vice President, Class of 1976 

Presentation of Student Council Scholastic Awards Kenneth R. Cruickshank 

President, Student Council 

Presentation of the American Field Service Representative R. Edward Beard 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Presentation of Awards Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

A Letter to the graduates of Medfield High School from the President 

of the United States 
Harvard Prize Book 
D.A.R. Certificate 
Bausch & Lomb Science Award 
Faculty Award of Merit 
Family Leader of Tomorrow Award 

Presentation of Scholarships 

Mrs. Edward G. Byrnes, Hannah Adams Club 

John Booth, President, Medfield Lions Club 

Thomas A. Madsen, President, Medfield Jaycees 

George J. Callahan, President, Medfield Teachers Association 

Paul E. Hinkley, A.L. Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 



148 



Francis A. Woodlock, Commander, A.L. Beckwith Post No. 110 
Richard D. Bishop, President, Medfield Police Association 
John C. Rudisill, Jr., Corning Glass Company 

Tassos P. Filledes, Medfield Chapter of the National Honor Society 
Tassos P. Filledes, Woman's Auxiliary to the Norfolk District Medical 
Society 

Presentation of American Legion Medals Albert J. Manganello, Jr. 

Jr. Vice Commander, A.L. Beckwith Post No. 110 



Medfield High School Concert Band 
Second American Folk Rhapsody 

Presentation of Diplomas 



Clare Grundman 



John C. Rudisill, Jr., Chairman, Medfield School Committee 
Dr. Bruce C. Pulsifer, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



Benediction 

Recessional 

Consecration of the House 



The Reverend Father Lawrence Ryan 



Beethoven 



CLASS OF 1976 



Paul B. Allen 

Donald Scott Akin 

Catherine L. Anastasi 

Vincent Louis Andella, Jr. 

James Edward Angelis 

Donna Armstrong 
*John Andrew Auld, Jr. 

Kenneth Earl Balcom 

Stephanie Ann Bassett 

Karen Ann Batting 

Michael Martin Battisti 

Scott Alan Berry 
^Barbara Anne Bertram 
*Janet Lee Beswick 

David Allen Bird 

Robin Blandy 

Andrew Ralph Bombelli, Jr. 

Robert Thomas Booth 

* *Marlene Fader Boughton 

Mark Davidson Boulter 
David Michael Bowman 

*Lynne Tyson Breed 
David True Brown, Jr. 

*Anne Elizabeth Bruno 

* *Joseph Michael Bruno 
Philip James Burr, Jr. 



*Richard Alan Burr 
*David Peter Byrnes 

JoAnn Callow 

MaryLouise Canty 

William Morrison Capen, Jr. 

Lauren Carton 

Sheryl A. Caruso 

Robert John Casey 
*Thomas James Cauley 

Diane Michelle Chick 

Wendy Anne Chudzik 

Philip Daniel Colella 

Alan Richard Connors 
*Christine Karen Constas 

Jonathan Philip Cook 

Mark Ronald Coomber 

Julie Anne Copeland 

Starr Copithorne 

Elizabeth Anderson Cowen 

Michael Patrick Coyne 

Richard Alan Cranshaw 

MaryLouise Cribbin 

Kenneth Robert Cruickshank 

Marianne Curry 

Richard Stephen Gushing 

Victor Peter Daloia 



149 



Robert Francis Xavier Danyla 

Theresa A. Davis 

Sheree Lee Dawe 

Eileen Frances DeSorgher 

Joseph Michael deVeer 
*Pamela L. Draheim 

Deborah Ellinor Dutchka 
*Susan Ann Eilertson 

Robert Brian Ellena 

Audrey L. Evans 

Linda Hill Fawcett 

Corinne Anne Feehan 
*Laura Michele Fellini 

Eugene Carl Fetteroll, III 
*Susan Marie Finerty 
*Sandra Lee Flagg 

Christopher Clough Flanders 

John James Gallagher 

Terrie A. Gallagher 

Philip Michael Gavrilles 

Brian Patrick Gibson 
^Deborah Suzanne Gifford 

Timothy Edward Gillespie 

Bernard Francis Gilooly 

Richard Eric Glass 

Keith William Goodwin 

Karen Anne Gorman 

Alan Christopher Haigh 

Diana Marie Hallal 
*Deborah Jean Hallinan 

Laura Jean Handy 

Jon David Hansen 

William Gregory Harrison 

Sally Elizabeth Hay 

Patricia Lynn Hersee 
*Edwin James Hilpert, Jr. 
*Robert Michael Hilpert 
*Sheryl Ann Hobel 

Deborah Ann Hogg 

Trygve Hoist 

Thomas Joseph Hunt 

Christine Marie Johannessen 
^Stephen Wesley Johnson 
*Sally Ann Juda 
*Cynthia Anne Kalweit 

Peter Joseph Kelleher 

Theresa Kerekon 

Michael Joseph Keris 

Allan Alonzo Kingsbury, III 
*Mary Ann Kluga 

Harry Jean Kohn 
4-*Kirsi Kyllikki Kotiranta 

Linda Marie Laakso 

Cheryl Lynn Langley 

Suzanne E. Larkin 



Richard Dennis Larson 
Robert Wade Larson 
Bruce William LeClaire 
Dianne Ledwith 
Alan John Levy 

*Dawn Rae Lomker 
Donna Marie Lyall 
Michael Anthony MacDonald 
Nancy Anne Mahoney 
Rhona Marie Manganello 
Patti Ann Maples 
Blair Roberts March 
Dawn Frances Marinella 
Christopher Brent Mayland 
Maureen Teresa McCarthy 
Richard T. McCarthy 
Leslie Anne McCarty 
David Ralph McDowell 
Edward Ralph McGlynn 
Thomas James McGrath 
Sherrill Lynn McKay 

^Patricia Susan McKnight 
Richard Mark McKnight 
Joyce Ellen McLaughlin 
John Thomas McMahon 

*William Albert McManus 

*Kim Amy McMurtrie 
Elizabeth Eileen Meagher 
Doreen Ayn Mills 

^Stephen Eric Moffatt 
Lisa Anne Moore 

*Leslie Anne Morgan 
Michael Preston Morgan 
Peter James Moynihan 
Keith Thomas Mozer 
Brian Patrick Murphy 
Michael Joseph Murphy 
Cynthia Carol Neff 
William Arthur Nightingale 
David Joseph Nyren 
Patrick James O'Brien 
Mary Elizabeth O'Dell 

*Karen Ann O'Donnell 
Susan Elizabeth O'Malley 
Denise Marie 0' Toole 
Thomas Earle Owen 
Edward Joseph Papsis, Jr. 
Daniel Joseph Pellegrini 
Judith Lynn Perry 

^Cheryl Ann Phipps 
Ronald Wayne Pinder, Jr. 
Bruce Edward Powell 
Juliette Marie Powers 
Deborah Lee Priestley 
Anthony John Pritoni 



150 



Janet Lynn Rayner 
Paul Christopher Reardon 
Cynthia June Regan 
Laurie Jean Renzi 
Douglas Gerard Richard 
Donna M. Rossi 
Keith Roy Rutherford 
Robert Francis Ryan, Jr. 
Steven Salemi 
Richard Marc Salisbury 
Kathleen Tinun Sander 
Stephen Paul Saulnier 
Russell P. Scarlata 
JoAnne Schortmann 
Jean Marie Senatore 
John Deeb Shagoury 
Linda Claire Shaw 
Carolyn Frances Shea 
Thomas Leo Shiels 
Kingsley Huntington Shinner 
Douglas Price Smith 
Nancy Ellen Smith 
William Everett Smith 
Jamie AnnMarie Spittel 
John Joseph Sproules 
James Worden Steamer 



Richard Michael Stetson 

Michael Allen Stokes 

Sandra Cecelia Strittmatter 

Christine Marie Sullivan 

James Will Sullivan 
*Mark Tyrell Sullivan 

Renee Briana Teresa Sumner 

Paul Roger Superior 

Stephanie J. Thayer 
'^Catherine Jane Timmerman 

Ann Louise Tripp 

Ian Robert Ulrich 

David James Vanslette 

Nancy Ellen Walker 

Michael Keenan Walsh 

Linda Marie Walton 

Charles Thomas Warren, III 
*Kimberly Paige Warren 

Scott Arthur Watkins 

Deborah Louise Weir 
^Jennifer Ann Wenz 

Christopher West Wetmore 

Stephen Paul Wiberg 

Robert Charles Winters 
*Russell Crockett Woglom 
*George Borkey Yundt 



^Members of the National Honor Society 
+American Field Service Student 



REPORTOFTHE 
DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my third annual report on the Special Services 
Department. 1976 was a year of change in the system as a whole and I would 
like to thank former administrators for their support of programs for 
children with special needs. I look forward with confidence to continued 
support for special needs programming from the new Superintendent and 
greater assistance in financial management from our new Busin^^ss Manager. 

The Special Services Department has many sections providing service to 
all children in the system. These sections are: guidance, health, 
psychology, speech and language, and learning disabilities. 

Major emphasis in 1976 has been continuation of thorough diagnostic- 
prescriptive planning as mandated under Chapter 766. With the initial 
evaluations completed on all special needs students, more of the staff's 
efforts are devoted to maintaining the existing plans. New referrals have 
stabilized. 



151 



Our pre-school and kindergarten-entry screening programs have been very 
successful in identifying students who need additional help to benefit from 
the early school experiences. 

With the assistance of AVIS volunteers, the school nurses have for the 
first time completed the vision and hearing screening programs before the 
Christmas vacation. Community help has also been provided in the health area 
by the Lions Club during the kindergarten-entry screening, and by the 
Visiting Nurse Association with the immunization clinic. 

In anticipation of the opening of the Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School, the Guidance Department of the Junior High School and the 
Career Counselor have scheduled student and parent meetings to explain the 
course offerings of the new school. As 1976 came to a close, a new Career 
Decision Making Profile was administered to the eighth and ninth grade 
students to assist in making decisions about which high school a student 
should attend. To assist in post-high school planning, all eleventh grade 
students also completed this profile. 

In last year's report I indicated that our focus would be on quality 
service delivery for 1976. I am confident that this objective has been met. 
Looking forward to 1977, the community can expect continued quality service 
with additional diversification in services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Keu^n J. Vlynn 

Director of Special Services 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MEDIA SERVICES 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit this report for Library/IMC services in the 
schools for the year of 1976. It has been a successful year, and the on- 
going programs of the school IMCs continue to show progress. 

Our major direction for the year has been in the area of instruction in 
library skills, and the development of formal instruction in this area. As a 
result of a pilot program in the Ralph Wheelock School, a workshop was held 
in June, 1976, in which six classroom teachers and two librarians spent one 
week developing a coordinated program for grades K-9, with demonstration 
materials to accompany instruction. This program was implemented in all 
these levels in September, 1976; on the premise that library skills are most 
effectively learned through the subject areas, librarians have worked with 
individual class teachers in presenting materials. The program has been well 
received. 

Continued training has been continually offered to teachers in the 
production of audio-visual materials and the use of equipment to make these 
materials effective in the classroom. In-service time has been given to 
this project, and the librarians also sponsored for the second time the 
course "Media in Medfield". In the current school year, workshops are being 
offered on demand by the teachers in each school. 

152 



Our general services continue to provide teachers with technical 
assistance in the audio-visual area and in teaching resources, to students 
in the area of resources and training, and in the provision of material and 
service to the public. The Department has continued to provide equipment 
for public use in the school buildings, and has participated in two major 
areas of the community Bicentennial activities. We are in the process of 
completing a 2x2" slide record of the community activities during 1976 which 
will be offered to the public, and we participated in the Medfield 
Memorabilia exhibition with an exhibit of these slides. We have also worked 
with the Time Capsule committee in editing a taped commentary by the people 
of Medfield to be included in the capsule. 

In the area of general usage of the school IMCs for the school year 
1975-76, there are several statistics of note. More than 1000 scheduled 
classes were conducted in the IMCs; in addition to this number, there was a 
daily average of 127 students who used the IMCs for their individual needs. 

Total scheduled classes 1,070 

Average daily student utilization . . . 127 
Average daily "outside" circulation . . 74 

Inventory: books 29,408 

Inventory: audiovisuals 5,343 

Inventory: items of equipment 546 

We continue to have the utmost respect for the individuals from the 
community who volunteer to work in the school libraries; there are currently 
over 50 people who contribute approximately two hours per week in this area, 
and we thank them. As the first volunteer group in the schools of Medfield, 
this group is still going strong; in addition to their dull routine duties, 
they have sponsored and operated book fairs in all elementary buildings, 
and by these efforts have made possible several improvements in our school 
IMCs which would otherwise have been impossible. 

We would like to thank the administration, school committee and public 
for their continued support of this vital educational service, and again 
invite the public to come in to the school IMCs, either to visit us or to 
use whatever materials they might find of interest. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Van E. Hogan 

Director of Media Services 



153 



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit the first annual report of the Medfield Public 
School's Business Manager. 

The position of Business Manager was created effective July 1, 1976. 
Specific responsibilities assigned to this area include; financial 
management and budget development, maintenance and operation of school plant 
and equipment, school transportation services, food services, and purchasing 
supervision. Throughout the initial six month period emphasis has been 
placed on several major areas as dictated by need. 

School transportation programs have been reviewed and several procedural 
changes have been made to comply with recent legislation. Materials for 
classroom instruction regarding school bus safety have been developed in the 
system. A school bus conduct form has been instituted to assist drivers in 
maintaining a high level of safety standards. 

The organization of the maintenance department has been enhanced through 
the development of a Work Order System which assigns a priority for 
unscheduled work and makes more efficient use of personnel time. Previously 
vacant positions have been filled with specifically qualified personnel who 
provide our system with added maintenance capabilities. 

Successful audits of all Federal Grants and the School Lunch Services 
have been conducted during this fiscal year. The status of these programs 
has been positively confirmed providing the department with a firm basis to 
initiate change and increase efficiency. In concert with this work, a new 
Purchase Order format has been established providing increased control of 
expenditures and more efficient processing of invoices. 

Budget development has proceeded throughout the months of September - 
December. A new presentation format has been instituted which summarizes 
all projections and reduces the volume of back-up material. 

Studies have been initiated in several of the operational areas under 
the direction of the School Committee and Superintendent: Use of School 
Facilities, School Bus Transportation, Centralized Purchasing, and Long 
Term Preventative Maintenance plans. 

Reports of individual departments are filed separately to provide 
greater detail. 



154 



The cooperative spirit and active support of the Clerical Staff, 
Cafeteria Workers and Custodians have been instrumental in the successful 
implementation of the Business Manager concept. Additionally, the support 
of the School Committee, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, Town 
Officials and Citizens has been commendable and deeply appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rll66qM a. PeueAeau 

Business Manager 



REPORT OF MEDFIELD ADULT EDUCATION 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 6, 1976, was the beginning of the second semester of the 1975- 
76 Adult Education Program. A total of 24 classes in 20 different courses 
were continued by the Director. The courses continued were Flower Arrange- 
ment, Clothing I, Clothing II, Driver Education, Typing, Painting I, 
Drawing, Woodworking, Men's Gym, Slimnastics, Tennis, Italian Cooking, Craft 
Boutique, Needlepoint, Shorthand, Bridge, Photography, Law for the Layman, 
Advanced Flower Arrangement, and Yoga. Courses discontinued for lack of 
enrollment were Painting II, Conversational Spanish, Decoupage, Macrame, and 
Modern Dance. All courses were offered on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or 
Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1976-77 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of 30 
different Courses. Of these 24 courses were established, with double 
offerings in Woodworking, Tennis, Flower Arrangement, Yoga, and Driver 
Education. New courses established were Typing II, Tole and Decorative 
Painting, Quilting, Belly Dance, and Intermediate Yoga. A total of 535 
people registered for the above courses. An additional 90 students were also 
enrolled for the Driver Education Program in January, 1976. 

There were several very popular courses this past year: Automotive 
Maintenance, Holiday Workshop, Flower Arrangement, Slimnastics, Belly Dance, 
Quilting and Tennis. These courses had reached the maximum enrollment the 
first night of registration. A special course consisting of ten lectures was 
given for the school secretaries from Medfield and the Tri-County Association 
of Educational Secretaries. 

This year we requested and were granted State funds to help support the 
Adult Education Program. 

Achievement night for the 1976-77 Adult Education Program will be held 
on Thursday, April 14, 1977, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the High School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Clloco, J a.. 

Director 



155 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my first report as the Athletic Director for the 
year ending December 31, 1976. 

The Junior High and Senior High interscholastic program is considered 
an integral part of the total education of our youth. Interscholastic 
teams were fielded in football, field hockey, basketball, and baseball at 
the Junior High School. Following is the Junior High coaching staff: 

Football, Eighth and Ninth Grades George Calimeris, Paul Staruk 

Field Hockey, Freshman Suzanne Moulton 

Basketball, Seventh and Eighth Grades Gary Stockbridge 

Basketball, Freshman Gordon Hodne 

Baseball, Seventh and Eighth Grades Richard Connolly 

Baseball, Freshman John Eckstrom 

Interscholastic teams at the High School for the girls were, field 
hockey, soccer, volleyball, cross country, basketball, gymnastics, softball 
tennis, and cheerleading. Boys' teams competed in football, soccer, cross 
country, basketball, winter track, baseball, spring track, tennis, and golf 
Following is the High School coaching staff: 

Field Hockey (Varsity), Nancy Kelley, (J.V.), Suzanne Look 
Football (Varsity) , William Young - Head Coach 

Gary Youlden - Assistant Coach 
Football (J. v.), David Gibbs 
Boys Cross Country, Robert Belmont 
Girls Cross Country, Bernard Shea 
Volleyball, Judith Noble 
Boys Soccer, Thomas Cowell - Head Coach 

Ralph LeClere - Assistant Coach 
Girls Soccer, Pat Scarsciotti - Head Coach 

Philip Peterson - Assistant Coach 
Indoor Track, Gary Youlden 

Boys Basketball (Varsity), David Gibbs, (J.V.) John Eckstrom 
Girls Basketball (Varsity), Karen Graham, (J.V.) Suzanne Moulton 
Gymnastics, Mary Robbins 

Baseball (Varsity), Gary Stockbridge, (J.V.) William Toof 
Softball (Varsity), Suzanne Moulton, (J.V.) John Nichols 
Spring Track, Gary Youlden - Head Coach 

William Young - Assistant Coach 
Girls Spring Track, Suzanne Look 
Girls Tennis, Susan Carney 
Boys Tennis, Robert Hunter 
Golf, James Sproul 
Cheerleading I & II, Judith Noble, Georganne Iverson 



156 



All of the High School teams competed in the Tri-Valley League, except 
for the girls soccer team, which competed as an independent. The boys 
soccer team tied for the league championship as did the volleyball team for 
the girls. The girls soccer compiled a fine 9-3-1 record, while the football 
team finished an exciting fall season 7-3. 

The winter season had the Big Blue Basketball team finishing at 18-3 
with the league championship again. They also qualified for the Eastern Mass 
State Basketball Tournament once more. The cheerleaders won first place in 
Tri-Valley cheering competition and showed fine spirit all year. 

The year ending sports banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School 
Boosters, saw a record number of participants receive certificates and 
letters. Scholar Athlete Awards were presented to Edwin Hilpert and Anne 
Bruno for their outstanding contributions to Medfield High School. The 
Edward Keyes Scholarship Award of $300 went to a fine Medfield student named 
Russ Woglom. 

This year showed another increase in participation in our inter- 
scholastic program. We have improved our program with the addition of field 
hockey, basketball, and softball for girls at the Junior High School. The 
High School program has seen the addition of a girls soccer team and ice 
hockey for boys. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GoAMdXt S. Voilldm 

Athletic Director 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1976. 

The Food Service Program has been able to maintain the price of a school 
lunch at forty-five cents this year. With the assistance of food 
commodities (that cost a nominal amount) and state and federal reimbursements, 
the program has been able to operate without a deficit. In this past year, 
1976, the Food Service Program supplied a nutritional meal to 228,830 
students, 161,407 cartons of milk and 9817 faculty lunches for which we 
charge ninety cents and a meal tax charge. 

With the aid of "state funds" the program was able to install a new 
dishwasher at the High School this year. The new dishwasher enabled the 
program to maintain a high level of cleanliness that is periodically 
inspected by the Town Sanitarian, Mr. Keefe. 

At the present time the program is focusing its efforts on attaining a 
new 30 quart mixer complete with attachments for the Memorial School. The 
present mixer with no attachments has been in the cafeteria since 1954. A 



157 



new mixer would be a great help in the preparation of the many lunches 
prepared each day. In the near future, additional sneeze guards will be 
installed on the serving lines at all schools in response to a Board of 
Health ruling. 

During the month of October the Food Service Program was happy to 
provide lunches at the Memorial, Ralph Wheelock and the High School to the 
Corps of Army Engineers who were servicing some of the school playgrounds 
and athletic fields. In addition to lunch, evening dinners were made 
available to the men by the members of the Food Service Program at Ralph 
Wheelock School. Their cooperation and hard work were greatly appreciated 
by me and the Army Corps of Engineers. The Program at Memorial School was 
also able to furnish lunches and dinners to those working on the Town 
Election Days. The expense for these meals was covered by Town Funds. 

For the second year our department has cooked and served for the Senior 
Class Banquet in June. 

It is also my pleasure to give assistance during the year to students 
planning money-making dinners, such as the Music Boosters Annual Spaghetti 
Supper, Dime-a-Dip etc. 

I sincerely thank the new Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, 
Business Manager, School Committee, Cafeteria Staff, Custodial Staff and 
other personnel for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Von.othy E. AveAt/ 
School Lunch Director 



REPORT OFTHE DIRECTOR 
OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



To the Superintendent: 

It is a pleasure to submit my eighth annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and 
preventive maintenance projects accomplished during the year. 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Major repairs and renovations to the Administrative Area: 
Partitions installed. 

Sound proofing installed in office area ceiling. 
Carpeting installed in part of the area. 
New lighting fixtures installed. 
Majority of office area painted. 



158 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (continued) 

Repairs to the Auditorium: 
Reupholstered all seats. 
Painted entire facility. 

Major renovations to the Chemistry and Physics Labs were accomplished 
in accordance with the special article approved at the annual Town 
Meeting. 

Other repairs: 

Draperies installed in the Gym, Cafeteria, and Nurses Room. 

Ceiling repairs in the main corridor . 

Ranch fencing installed around the front of the building. 

Fluorescent lighting installed in the Boiler Room. 

All outside access doors were refinished and painted. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Rewired Boiler Room. 

Installed Fluorescent lights in Boiler Room. 

Installed new hot water heater. 

Installed two water coolers. 

Replaced two skylights. 

New asphalt laid over the entire play area and driveways. 

Installed fence around playground. 

Repaired Baseball Backstop. 

Replaced water vacuum. 

Installed Kindergarten playground. 

WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Replaced valves in univents . 

Replaced bearings in univents. 

Installed fluorescent lights in Boiler Room. 

Partition installed in Work Room. 

Sound proofed Library Conference Room. 

Rebuilt two circulating pumps. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Painted outside trim. 

Painted Woodworking Shops. 

Rebuilt two circulating pumps. 

Repaired Scoreboard in Gym. 

Repaired all damage caused by freeze up. 

Replaced one Strapovac. 

Replaced one Water Vac. 

Relocated outside thermo control. 

Repaired and replaced several thermostats. 



159 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 

Installed new ceiling in freezer. 

Installed emergency lights in School Committee Room and Corridors. 

Repaired flat roof areas. 

Installed new gutters. 

Painted Office Area Lavatories. 

Installed new relief valves on boilers. 

Installed new Master Control for burners. 

Asphalt laid over all driveways. 

Repaired and replaced fencing. 

Installed fluorescent lights in Boiler Room. 

ALL SCHOOLS 

Painted all curbings and parking lot stops. 

Loamed, seeded, fertilized all fields. 

Sprayed all fields with broadleaf, and insect control. 

Repaired Football Field Scoreboard and installed new Time Clock. 

Replacement of glass, and repaired other damage caused by vandalism. 

Burners, boilers, smokepipes, chimneys, and fire boxes all cleaned 

and repaired. 

Locker Rooms and Receiving Rooms all painted. 

Gym floors, bleachers, and stages all varnished. 

In addition to the specifics listed above, the Maintenance Department 
was happy to provide assistance at all school athletic functions, festivals 
and shows, and to other community groups making use of the buildings. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. 

Sincere appreciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent 
Assistant Superintendent, and Business Manager for their cooperation and 
assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HoAold VnAXovU 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 



160 



i 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
VITAL STATISTICS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1976 



161 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Chapter 45 of the General Laws of Massachusetts requires that every 
physician shall within fifteen days after the birth at which he has 
officiated, report the same to the Town Clerk of the Town in which the 
birth took place. 

Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every house- 
holder, within forty days after a birth in his house shall cause notice 
thereof to be given to the Town Clerk of the Town in which the birth took 

place. 

Failure to give such notice is punishable with a fine. 

Blanks for the return may be obtained upon application to the Town 
Clerk. 

Parents and others are requested to carefully examine the following 
lists and if there are any errors or omissions, report such at once to 
the Town Clerk. This is important so that we may have as accurate and 
complete a record of Vital Statistics as possible. 




162 



Q 

UJ 
LL 

a 

LU 



c 


QJ 


o 


0) 


m 6 


W) 


>-l rH 


cfl 


QJ O 


S 


e ^ 




W CO 


• 


•H 


C/3 


• ^ 




P^ O 


C 




OJ 


nj • 


OJ 


n3 <: 


}-< 


C 


d 


•H >^ 


(fl 


kJ ^^ 


S 


-oS 


■T3 


c 


C 


rt T3 


CO 


d 




• cfl 


• 


<i 


o 


4-' Q 


<u 


^ 


00 


CU rH 


5-1 


^ D 


O 


O 03 


<D 







0) 


















N 
4J 






•H 
J-) 
















X) 






U 






.^ 






•H 






J-) 
















03 






9 


•UJ d 




o 


Cfl 


>^ 


> 


X 




O 






d 




en 


-:ii 




Q) 




c 


> 


Vj o 




03 


CU 


x; 


O 


o 


CU 


5-1 






o 


5-1 


.H 


•H 




S >^ 




o 


o 


0) e 




X) 


CU 


Ct. 


X3 


d 


d 


•H 


5-1 




en 


CU 


en >H 


C 


5-1 


0) 






5-1 


x: CU 


en 


d 


Di 


5-1 


CU 


>. 


CU 


O 


X 


CU 


^ 


riiJ 


3 -H 


iH 


O 






0) 


O 


O -H 


•H 


ffi 




3 


•H 


J 


CU 




o 


4.J 


d 


5-1 


xi :s 


O 


.H 


s 'd 




rH 




(U C/D 


4-1 






:s 


hJ 




5-1 


• 


Pi 


•H 


•H 


03 


>. 


r^ 


>. 


03 


d 


i-t 


• 


p 


5-1 




W 






• 


O 


s 




_d 


K 


eu 


p^ ^ 


CO 


03 


4J O 


C 


03 


hJ 


M 


d 


< 






• 


<d 






• 


^ 






s 




H 


0) O 


>^ o 




. CU 


o 




CU 


<: 


•-) 




• 


4-1 


1-) 




. 


m 


d 


. 




^ s 


:s 




03 


Pi >^ 




>^.H 






OS 


s 


CU 




• 


O 


w 


CU CU 


I-) 


. 


03 




. 


S-i 


>. 


CU 


iH 


CU 


d 


x: 


5-1 




5-1 


(U 


CO 






CU d 




!xl 


00 • 


• 


p 


13 


d <: 


5-1 


5-1 


x: 


CU 


■p 


OS 


03 


03 


•H 




03 


CU 


-H d 


cfl 




5-1 H 


M 




d 


(U 1 


>. 


CU 


a 


CU 


•H 


Xi 


•H 


&0 


d 


rH 




d 


X 03 


^3 


e 


S >. 




u 


03 


>-l ?^ 


oi 


> 


•H 


iH 


'T3 


5-1 


X 


5-1 


OS 


CU 


03 


4J O 


c 


•H 


>^ 


0) 


C/3 


03 5-1 


(^ 


CU 


S 


X 


<U 


03 


iJ 


03 


,H 


•H 


O 


•-5 


03 "-J 


•H 


fc^ 


!-i 


U 


x: 




t^ 0) 




PQ 




■U 


5-1 


P3 


g. 


S 


^ 


V-i 


:z 




^ 


hJ 




XI 03 


1 


ij 


XI 


s 


X) 




T3 


03 


(U 






s 


d 




XI 


XI 




XI 


C S 


03 


d 


X3 


d 


^3 


d 


i^ 


2 


TJ 


o 


X) 




S T3 


d 


X3 d 


XI 


c 


O! 




(U 


03 


d X) 


03 


d 


03 






d 




d 


XI 




d 


03 


d OS 


d 


03 


X) 


X) 


32 




03 d 




OS 




X) 


X3 


03 


X3 


03 


d 


X) 


03 




OS 


03 




• C! 


C 






03 


• 




• 


d 


d 




d 




03 


d 




. 






. 


pq 03 


03 


X) 


s 




p 


• 


Pm 


03 


08 


• 


03 


• 




03 


• 


•-> 


• P^ 




> 






d 




PQ . 




f^ 








W 




H 






CO 




>-) 


s 




>^ • 


. 


03 


X) 


ffi 


B 




iH 


• 


• 




• 




s 


• 




d 


en 




^ 


^ IS 


H 




}-i 


<u 


03 


rC 


CU 


C/3 


•d 


X) 


Pu 


en 




CO 


4-> 


o 


5-< CU 


4J 


o 


^ 




X3 


0) 


M X) 


•H 


0. 


03 






rH 




03 


en 




u 


u 


CU rH 


o 


•H 


o c 


d 


•H 


^ 


5-1 -H 


iH 


CU 


x: 


iH 


iH 


03 


d 


e 


CU 


d 


CU 


>^ 


•U 5-< 


•H 


5-1 




^ 


> 


a 


o > 


rH 


CO 


a 


3 


u 


d 


X 


o 


£ 


0) 


XI 


ceS 


-H 03 


^ 


0) 


•H "o 


o 


03 


•H 


CU 03 


•H 


o 


•H 


03 


03 


o 


o 


,d 


OS 


r-! 


o 


rH 


OS X 


w 


Q 


H ^ 


•-) 


P 


cd 


a p 


:2 


•-) 


S 


P-i 


o 


pi: 


^ 


H 


•-) 


<: 


Pi 


c^ 


^2 O 



Q 
LU 
O 
CC 
O 
O 
lU 

cr, 



GC 
CO 



CO 





d 




rt 




> 




•H 




,H 




iH 




d 


d 


CO CD 


•H 


iH 


03 


+j CU 


U 


CU -H 




5-4 d 


5-1 


03 03 


CU 


60 P 


XI 


5-1 


d 


0) d 


03 


IS d 


X 


<: 


Q) 


CU 


iH 


d ^ 


< 


•H CU 




5-1 U-4 


d 


CU -H 


03 


x: d 


X 


•p d 


■P 


OS CU 


w 


u ^ 

















d 


















(U 
















o 


















CO 






W 










en 














tfl 




M 






d 










d 


o 












M >. 




3 






•H 




^ 


d 




CU 


N 












OS ^ 




O 


>. 




bO 




^1 


o 




X! 


^3 












e en 




CJ 


X5 


d 


&0 




03 


en 




ex 


03 






>^ 


>. 




OS VH 


>. CO 


iH 


d 


OS 


•H 


>.rH 


XI 




d CU 


u 






CU 


CU 


,i<i 


!Z O 


CU -H 


CU 


,H CU 


> 


ffi 


CU 


O 


•H 


en 


o -u 


OS 


d 




O 


en 


>^ 0) 


O 5^ 


> 5-1 


^ 


CU p 


o 




d 




> 


d 


en CO 


■p 


03 


5-1 


d 


en 


CU d 


S CU 


U U 


XJ 




d 


QJ 


5-1 


d 


03 


d 


d. 


s 


5-1 


•H 


03 


•H 


>H 03 


o 


CU O 


X) ■!-• 


1 CU 


o 


iH 


03 


o 


P 


5-1 


e 5-1 


O 


CU 


x: 


5-1 


en x: 


03 


PC S 


O -U 


•H -H 


p 


,H 


PC 


4-1 




P3 


O CU 




S 


:s 


C-3 


5-1 


M o 


•H CU 




P o 


W U 




CU 




CU 


rH 




x: CU 


CU 








O 


d o 


d <H 


x: Q) 


o 


5-1 


o 


x: 


CU 


iH 


CU 


x: 


H ^ 


CU 


en 


^ 


5-1 


s 


•H fc^ 


•H rH 


00 d 


d en 


CU 03 




o 


•H 


5-1 


03 


4-) 


o 


hJ 


CU 


d 


CU 




t^ 


00 CU 


•H d 


03 CU 


a !j> 


CU 


•H 


5-1 


03 


x: 


d 


en 




CU 


03 


4-1 


d 


x: 


5-1 X3 


0) 03 


rH 5-1 


o 


•H 


s 


S 


U 


o 


Pd 


<U -H 


CU 


Pi 


PM 


en 


s: 


d 4-1 


•H M 


hJ N 


O Ph 


p:: 05 


5-J 






•H 




5-1 CU 


•H 






o 


o 


d CU 


> 


3 


PQ 


x: 


03 


d 




,i«i 


S 


d 


>>-H 


d 


d 


>. 


P^ 


^-D 


<: PQ 


X 


OS CO 


03 


d -u 


S 


CU 


d 


O 




CU 


< d 


03 


>-, 


5-1 








d 03 


a 


>^ en 


CU d 




4-1 


CU 


•H 


j-i 


■H 


03 


x: 


5-1 


O 


d 


d 


<U 0! 


03 U 


•H CU 


CU en 


5-1 OS 


03 


en 


CU 


5-4 


4-1 


en 


03 Xi 


a^ 


M 


o 


OS 


•H ,H 


rC O 


en i 
en ^ 


T-\ -H 


d E 


5-1 


•H 


nH 


5-1 


O 


•H 


d -u 


CU 


4-) 


CU 


en 


•H 


iH S-I 


00 Xi 


X: rH 


03 03 


03 


5-1 


•H 


CU 


CJ 


5-1 


d OS 


4-1 


OS 


5-4 


03 


5-1 


d 03 


CU CU 


CU 03 


en CU 


h3 CO 


H 


fe^ 


W 


P 


CO 


y, 


< ^ 


CO 


^ 


O 


•-: 


PQ 


>-) s 


a p 


■^ »D 


< S 





CNJ CN r-) 




5-1 5-1 S-I 




CU CU CU 




XI X X5 




e e 6 


w 


in CU CU CU 


H 


r- > > o 


<i 


C7^ O O CU 


P 


-H IZ S P 



iH ro o in vo 00 

<^ ^ iH CN CNJ CM CN 

>^ >^ >. >. >^ 1^ >^ 

5-t 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 

ceS cd 03 ct3 03 cfl cfl 

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 

q c c c c c c 

03 cfl ceS 03 ctS CO 03 

*-) *-i ^ >->>->>-) ^ 



vc r^ CO vD ^ 



CN iH iH CN CN CN 








>^ >. >. >^ >^ >^ 






CN vo cx) in in 


5^ 5-4 5-1 S-I 5-1 5-1 


iH CN 


en in 


in tH rH iH CN CN 


cC c^ c^ c^ Oj cd 








3 3 3 3 3 3 


x: x: 


XI x: 


x: x; x: xs x: x: 


^, ^, 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 


o o 


o o 


o o a o CJ o 


^ X5 XI Xi XJ XI 


S-4 ^^ 


5-1 5-1 


S-i S-i 5-1 5-1 $-4 5-1 


CU <U CU CU CU CU 

ft^ Pu Pu ft, |i^ fjH 


SS 


IS 


s s s a S S 



163 















60 






o 






CO 


oo 










5 
































c 






o 






4-t 


•H 
















Ti 














U 










•H 






o 






l-H 


4-1 










d 








u 














<u 










d -H 






a 




!>^ 


4J 










»-i 








o 


p^ 












4-1 










d rH 






CO 


r 


^ 


^ 


(U 










0) 






d 


IH 


x: 






u 


d 




X 










CO CO 






C-> 


e 


. CO 


O 








C 


d 


d 


d 


o 


4-1 


d. 




>> 


CU 


d o 




Q) 








w 


S x: 


d 


>^ 




CO 


•H 


< 13 


o 








o 


<1 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


u 




XI 


rH 


>^ O CO 




Q 








•H 


CO 


o 


T3 


• 


5-4 


d 


o 


2 


d 






CO 




CO 


CO 


>-l 


U 


d 




CO 


rH 


B X) rH 












CTJ 


• TJ 


u 


v-l 


w 


Xl 


o- 


CO ^ 




<u 


CO 




5-1 




d 


iH 


CU 


4-1 


S 


CO 


g 


d 


>-i d -H 




• 


0) 


■U 


OJ 


}-l 


•-) o 


CO 


3 




CO 




•H CO 


• 


•H 


(U 


d 


CO 


•-0 


£? 


CO 


e 


CO 




O 


CO 


S 


CO CO 12 




[2 


c 


>^ 


4J 


pq 


o 


0) 


0-1 


CU 


^ 


• 


^ s 


hJ 


>-i 


x: 


CO 


<U 




;? 


PM 


w 




• 


u 


O 




H 5-1 






•H 


O 


•H 




CO 






•H 


CO 


hJ 


rH 




PQ 


CO 


00 pL, 


a) 


CO 






• 


H 


CO 




• 


PQ • 




03 


0) 


PQ 


rC 


• 


TJ • 


• 


}-l 






?^ • 


4J 


•■ 




>-l 




o 




• 


4J 


> 




PQ 


• 


w 


W 




C 


Pi 




S 


< 


d w 




hJ 


3 


• 


<u 


rd fi^ 


CU 


O 


• 


o 


• 


•H 


• 


w 


0) 




d 




^2 




W • 




•H 




• 






•H 


• 




CO 


< 


o 


PL, 


M 




s 


s 


ffi 


iH 


!xl 




^ 


(U 


0) 


<U 




(U 


H QJ 




.U 


• 


kJ 


• 


<u 


hJ e 


M 


(U 


hJ 




CO 


<u 


CO 


• 








<: 




CU 


CO 


d 


(U 


d 


x: 


•H 


x: d 




cn 


CQ 




fl^ 


o 


CO 




d 




X 


t3 


'O rH 


00 


o 


CO 


• 


CO 




d 


d 


50 


•H 


}-i 


d 


CO 


M 


4-J d -H 




•H 




•H 




•H 


T3 -H 


CO 


CO 


-o 


4-1 


d 


d o 


u 




M 


<: 


4-> 


x) 


0) 


CO 


u 


}-( 


d 


CO 


u 


CO 


•H CO CO 




U 


c 


}-i 


c 


-a 


d 1-1 


•H 


•H 


d 


•H 


CO 


CO u 


CO 


d 


CO 




4J 


d 


4-) 


•H 


S 


0) 


s 


o 


o 


S 


ta o ^ 




x: 


<U 


0) 


^ 


d 


cO "H 


d 


o 


CO 


TJ 


u 


CO 


s 


CO 


X3 


CU 


CU 


CO 


CO 


o 


rC 


►-) 


XI 


QJ 


d ►n 5-1 




o 


d) 


H 


o 


CO 


;s: 


d 






d 




• a 




CO 


}-l 


tu 


J-I 




•H 






4-1 






QJ 


CO 


»D o 






1-H 




*-3 


C_) 




o 


T) 


• 


•-3 


X) 


u 


TJ 


d 


CO 


hJ 


o 


• 


>-i 


T3 


X) 


CO 


X) 


x) 


P 


o 


t3 hJ 




X) 


•H 


73 






w ta 


Q 


d 


u 




d 


t-j na 


d 


CO 


PQ 




k3 


u 


fc<i; 


d 


d 


u 


d 


d 




Pi 


xi d 




c 


W 


d 


T) 


T3 


d 




CO 


•-) 


na 


CO 


d 


CO 






t3 




<-) 




CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


t3 




d CO x) 




rt 




rt 


c 


d 


J-i CO 


n3 






d 




" CO 




TS 


Td 


d 


ts 




73 






^3 






d 


XI 


CO d 






n3 




cd 


CO 


OJ 


d 


• 


•> 


CO 


• 






d 


d 


CO 


d 


r> 


d 


. 


. 


d 


. 


. 


CO 


d 


. CO 




. 


C 


. 






x: • 


CO 


Pi 


• 




•r) 


w • 


> 


CO 


CO 




CO 


. 


CO 


Q 


z 


CO 


•-) 


'-) 




CO 


• S 




•-5 


CO 


•-D 


• 


• 


eu CO 






s 


• 




p^ 








• 




f^ 














• 




CO 


00 








•-^ 


p-1 


o 


• 


CO 




Pm 


4-) 


t^, 


CO 


• 


• 


>-> 


• 




• 


CO 


e 


• 





rH 


< 




>^<: 


H 


4-1 


I— 1 


CO 






4-1 CO 


Pu 


(U 


CO 




>>l 


d ^ 


•H 


hJ 


w 




:s 


u 


fx^ 


QJ 


CO 


PQ 


CO 


(U 




P2 


x: x: 


Z 


S-i 


QJ 


•H 


T3 


>^ 


CO -H 




r-l 


1 


rd 


0) 


o a 


O 






CU 




d 




iH 


•H 




•H 


CO 


u 




0^ 4-1 5-4 


W 


OJ 


3 


c 


•H 


u 


•H d 


d 


u 


a rQ 


x: (u 


d 


d 


rH 


o 


rili 


x: 


CU 


}-i 


rH 


5 


rH 


x: 


o 


d 


QJ O QJ 


§ 


X5 


g 


c 


> 


u 


>-i d 


CO 


CO 


o 


r-{ 


.H 


4J CO 


CO 


x: 


d 


d 


M 


4J 


^ 


CO 


rH 


iH 


o 


4-1 


x: 


CO 6 4.) 


o 


n3 


0) 


a 


CO 


X QJ 


,H 


^ 


rC 


CO 


•H 


d o 


M 


o 


CO 


>-< 


1 


5-1 


d 


rC 


•H 


o 


•H 


•H 


CU 


o 


O -H QJ 


(^ 


D^ 


CO 


o 


o 


PQ 


U Q 


<: 


u 


H 


Dt:! 


O 


< ^ 


PIH 


^-) 


pL, 


PQ 


<: 


hJ 


u 


:2 


^ 


:2 


X 


p-l 


*-) 


^ H 0. 





>. 
















x: 






M 






H 






d 




























U3 
















00 












M 






CO 




























a 














CO 


d 






O 






M 






00 








+J 




















5-1 














5-1 


o 






•H 










o 


•H 








4-1 


CO 


d 
















d 






d 








4-1 


rH QJ 






iH 






QJ 




QJ 


5-1 




d 




O 


QJ 


CO 
















2 




d 


QJ 




CO 


:s 


CO 


rH 4-1 


rH 


x: 


rH 






4-1 




> 


5-1 




o 




5-1 


J-i 


s 




CO 


d 


x: 












CO 


d 




•H 


o 


^ 


d d 


rH 


CJ 


•H 






4-1 


CO 


CO 


CO 




4-1 




O 


x: 


73 


d 


QJ 


o 


4J 


5-1 


CO 




4-1 




QJ 


•H 




5-1 


4J 


QJ 


O CO 


•H 


CO 


rH 


CO 




O 


CO 


5-1 


U 




rH 




d 


CO 


•H 


CO 


d 


d 


•H 


QJ 


rH 




)-l 




Xi 


^ 


d 


5-1 


5-1 


O 


O rH 


x: 


PQ 


O 


00 rH 


d 


o 


O 




CO 


•H 




CO 


>-' 


QJ 


00 


•H 


d 


6 


4-1 


,-{ 




QJ 


5-1 


d 


^ 


o 




CO 


ffi 


S Pm 


CO 




PM 


o 


QJ 


CO 


y* 




QJ 


QJ 


B 




PQ 




12 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


4-1 


o 




XI 


QJ 


o 


•H 


CO 


^ 


PQ 




CO 


o 


B 




z 


•H 


N 


o 


x; 


d 


•H 


CO 


d 




QJ 




QJ 


o 


x: 




d 


14-4 




rH 


>H 


H 


QJ 


rH 






d 


CO hJ 




CO 


T3 




d 


N 


5-1 


a 


•H 


5-1 


en 


CO 


o 


rH 


E 


Pi 




CO 


CO 


o 


CO 




<: 


5-1 




3: 


CO 


QJ 


>^ 


o 


QJ 


CO 


•H 


5-1 


d 


CO 


QJ 


o 


QJ 


CO 


Q 




o 


X) 


T-^ 


CO 




d 




d 




hH 


pj 




4-1 


d 




PL, 


d 


U 


4-1 


rH QJ 


•H 


rH 


CO 


QJ 


Q 


s 


2 


CO 


M 




^ 


J-{ 


rH 


QJ 


•H 


QJ 


•H 


CO 


CO 


d 




§ 


5-1 


CO 


CO 


CO 




•H 


5-1 


CO 


U T-^ 


o 


rH 


^ 


:$ 








o 


5-1 


CO 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


x: 


rH 


•H 


e 


5^ 


rH 


o 


>-l 


^ 


QJ 




00 


QJ 


p'^ 


M 


CO 


QJ 


CO O 


d 


•H 


X) 


o 


d 


CO 


d 


t-) 


O 


QJ 


5-4 




:2 


o 


rH 


5-4 


CO 


d 


w 


XI 


QJ 


2: 


x: 


QJ 


00 


B 


5-1 


QJ 


PQ 




x; o 


CO 


IS 


w 




& 


•H 


d 




hJ 


B 


73 


d 




•H 


•H 


S 


•t— ) 


CO 




d 


4-1 




a. 


d 


QJ 


CO 


5-1 


x: 




U -H 


5-1 






d 


d 


<3 


?^ 




CO 


d 


•H 


x: 


s 


rs 


d 


hJ 


M 


CO 


QJ 


CO 


o 


d 


X 


•-) 


CO 


^ 


d 




;z 


p-( 


4-1 


>. 


CO 


hJ 


o 




QJ 


CO 


1-) 


<3 


XI 


CO 








QJ 




QJ 


5-1 


Pu 




4-1 


< 






CQ 


CO 


CO 


d 


d 




5-1 


d 


x: 




kJ 


x: 


5-1 


O 






O 


d 


d 


4-1 


CO 


PQ 


a) 


M-4 


PQ 




o 


CO 




& 


TJ 




1^ 


X) 


•H 


CO >-. t3 


QJ 


o 


4-1 


>^ 




■U 


M-f 


O 


^ 


5-1 


Pi 


d 


QJ 


5-1 


d 




•H 


•H 




d 


hJ 


•H 


CO 


•H 


a 




d 


4J 


T3 4-1 


•H 


XI 


x; 


CO 


T-{ 


i 


•H 


<4-l 


QJ 


d 


QJ 




CO 


5-1 


QJ 


d 


d 


5-1 


d 


M 


o 


M 


S-i 


5-1 


5-1 


> 


•H 


>. 


QJ 


CO 


5-1 CO 


> 


rH 


4-1 


d 


<-i 


X) 


o 


X3 


CO 


4-1 


?^ 


CO 


d 


X5 


CO 


x: 


U 


d 


U 


CO 


X 


x: 


CO 


O 


CO 


5-1 


1 


5-1 


d 


O -H 


CO 


•H 


d 


o 


QJ 


o 


d 


QJ 


QJ 


5-1 


QJ 


1 


d 


CO 


O 


•H 


o 


CO 


QJ 


S 


CO 


a 


CJ 


X 


CJ 


O 


w 


PQ 


•d 


-) S 


Q 


CLD 


< 


•-> 


fc,^ 


►-) 


•-0 


O 


Pi 


pL. 


Pm 


CO 


hJ 


Pi 


o 


•-) 


CJ 


•-) 


•-^ 





in 


sD 


cr 


O 


rH 




ri 


rj 


rg 


r-) 


ro 




x: 


x: 


x: 


x: 


x: 


w 


CJ 


o 


o 


CJ 


CJ 


H 


hi 


5-< 


5-1 


5-1 


5-1 


< 




J2 


^ 


^ 


^ 



rH CM <r r^ (y> rH 



r^ O t^ CX) 

rH CN CN r^J 



5-15-15-1 

a a a 
<: < <: 



5-1 5-4 



5-4 5-15-15-4 
CL D. CX Du 
< < < < 



m C^ r^ O O rH rH 
CN-<r»d-lOrHrHrHCNCNrvlCO 

cOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcO 



rH CN eg 

in LD rH CN CN 



QJ QJ 

d d 
d d 



164 











^ 








(U 
















e 














u 




































•u 










4J 






o 














0) 




























CO 








(U 




CO 






rH 






H 














rH 












d 










c 






PQ 








> 




•H 






3 


c 


















CO 






CO 






CO 










03 






C 








o 




4J 




CO 


CO 


(U 




• 










CO 


.H 


CO 






0) 


T3 




•H 




•H 


d 




C3 


C 




CO 








o 




}-l 




a 


QJ 


CO 




hJ 


0) 








iH 


.H 


(U 






>^ 


o 




N 




d 


o 




c 


cu 




> 








•H 




3 




c 


C 


CO 






c 


>^ 






i-H 


CO 


t^ 






(U 


5-1 




0) 




•H 


4-1 




QJ 


N 


^ 




x: 






CO 




U 


d 


o 


00 


D 




• 


o 


.a 






0) 


^ 






>.t^ 


5-1 




> 




O 


iH 




5-1 


rt 


o 


• 


a 






S-i 


CO 




o 


"-0 


•H 


c 




sc 


CJ 


Cu 


(U 


(U 


3 


6 


x: 


5-1 


CU 




CO 




:= 




O 


•H 




pq 


W 


o 


s 


iH 


g 


T3 


CO 


•H 


• 


4J 




CO 


00 






CO 


M 


^ 


^ 


•H 


•H 


4-) 


CU 


X 


• 


sd 


u 






CO 


E 








PL, 




<U 


^ 


O 


X 


> 


< 


4J 


• 


P 


s 


cu 


CO 


a 


3 


5-1 


>-l 


5-1 


t:^ 


CU 


i-H 


CO 


:2 




(U 


• 




a 


<U CO 




• 


• 




x; 


[? 


CO 


O 




S-i 




CO 


< 




iH 


•H 


en 


s 


3 


3 


CO 




X3 


CU 


f^ 




• 


^ 


< 




o 


5-1 ffi 




^J 


fi^ 


• 


4-1 




K 


:2 


CO 


CO 


CO 


PL, 




• 




O 


U 






PQ 


O 


U^ 


• 


CO 


(U 




>^ 


w 


o 




p~, 


5-1 


CO 








•-) 


CJ 


• 






iH 


•-: 


x; 




<u 


■-3 


• 


a 


o 


• 


• 




PQ 




^ 


N 


i 


• 


iH 




o 


>^ 


CU 


pL, 


U • 




<u 


CO 




^ 


w 


• 


• 


1— 1 




4J 


• 


c 




< 




4J 


ffS 


p^ 


• 




• 




•H 


w 


5-1 


CO 


ac 


<-\ 


5 




^ S 




w 


M 


^ 


CO 




hJ 


hJ 


<u 


CO 


>-l 


•-) 


•H 


CO 




• 


a 






fj:^ 


• 


S 


^ 


nH 






(U 


^ 




U 


(U 


• 






•H 


CO 


CO 


N 


?^ 






pQ 


T3 


CO 




I— 1 


S-i 


c 


Q 


•H 


<u 


d 




> 




(£1 


• 


>^ 


> 


13 


3 


(U 


Q 


s 


< ^ 




C 


^ 


$-1 


•H 


M 


CO 


,H 


CO 


C 


S 


CO 


o 


CO 


(1) 




> 


CO 


<u 


3 




cu 


iH 




o 


5-1 


CU 


3 


& 


> 






•H 




QJ 


M 


o 


I— 1 


CO 


C 


•H 


c 


•H 




U 


u 


^ 


^ 


C 




•H 


0) 


<U 


>% 


3 


O 


3 




CO 


PQ 


CO 


(U 


CO 


d 


d CO 




Q 


CO 


,n 


W 


S 


c 


CO 


C 


hJ 


T3 


-a 


CO 


u 


CO 


0) 


T3 


3 


}-i 


<U 


U 


3 


5-1 


CO 


>^ S 




cn 


^ 


PQ 


d 


3 


<u o 






PQ 


0) 






< 


O 


<: 




c 


c 


u 


CO 


^ 


iH 


C 


O 


3 


r-l 


CO 


< 


CO 


CO 


CO 




-3 








d 


CO 


5^ 




-o 




Q 


T3 


T3 








13 


CO 


CO 




PQ 




r-i 


CO 


i-J 


CO 


•H 


S 




CJ) 


3 


O 


-3 


3 


13 


-3 


-3 


o 


3 


CO 13 




c 


T3 




C 


C 


TS 


TS 


T3 


C 




zr> 


T3 




^3 


W 






S 


W 




-o 




cn 




3 


CO 


3 


3 


3 


p 


cn 


^ d 




cd 


C 


^3 


CO 


CO 


c 


C 


c 


CO 


• 




c 


T3 


a 




• 


■^3 






-3 


3 


-3 




-o 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 






CO 


c 






CO 


CO 


CO 




>-i 


T3 


CO 


C 


CO 


-O 


ffi 


C 


T3 


-3 


3 


CO 


3 


-o 


s 




• 








-3 


13 


-3 




• 




CO 


• 


• 








• 


•d 


C 




CO 




fi 




CO 


3 


c 


CO 




CO 


§ 


• 


O 


• 


• 


• 


d 


d 


d • 




^-5 


• 




w 


s 


• 


• 


• 


PL, 




CO 


• 




• 


CO 


• 




CO 


CO 




• 






fe 




'D 


K 


P-i 


CO 


CO 


CO P^ 






PQ 


• 






fc^ 


PL, 


s 




r. 




,J 


• 


1-3 




a 


• 






• 


en 


• 




• 




CO 














en 


TS 




u 


s 


^ 








>^ 


• 


• 




•-3 




• 




P^ 


• 


• 


3: 




zn 


TJ 


s 


CD 


CO 


TS 


3 


TJ 


• 


• 


• >^ 


H 


H 


U 




CO 


4-1 


-o 


TJ 


,H 


x: 


H 


CJ 


4-1 




4J 


Pm 


CO 




W 


ft. 




CU 




5-1 




(U 


.-H 


5-1 


(U 


3 


fi. 


P^ 


< -d 


S 


CO 


3 


o 


•H 


(U 


tH 


<-i 


(U 


4 ' 






i^ 


U 


U 




CO 


CO 






CO 


00 jr 


CO 


CO 


r— 1 


O 


CO 


X 









4J 


g 


^ 


x: 


•H 


rH 


c 


CO 


CO 


•H 





C 


c 


CU 


(U 


0) 


c 


e 


•H 


iH 


S^ 


(U 


5-1 


u 




•H 


5-1 


x: 


x: 


eu 


1, 


d 


^ 


d o 


o 


■U 


!-i 


iH 


c 


C 


d 


c 


g 


,c 


^ 


XI 


00 ^ 


^ 


o 


3 


3 


!-i 


S 


o 


5-1 


a 


3 


CO 


a 


a 


<u 


x: 


5-1 


x: e 


< 


•H 


J-i 


CO 


•H 


(D 


o 


o 


CO 


•H 


o 


o 





o 


O 


o 


^ 


O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(U 


CO 


•H 


O 


x: 


•H 


•H 




S 





CO 


O -H 


0. 


p:i 


< 


S 


:2 


^ 


Pi 


Q 


Q 


H 


'-) 


^ 


Pi 


Pi 


e^ 


1-3 


H 


hJ 


Pu 


O 


>-) 


o 


O 


Pi 


hJ 


u 


2 


Pi 


en 


1-3 


S 


1-^ H 























t—\ 


























•T3 


































CU 




r~\ 


O 
























M 


































d 




(U 


,-i 
























CO 






















d 












o 




d 


r-^ 


5-1 










M 




'O 










o 


CO 




T3 














a; 


o 




tu 






PI- 




d 


CU 


(U 










M 




3 








o 


5-4 


•H 


d 


S-I 




4J 










T3 


g 




d 






CO 


>> 


o 


4-J 


CO 











M 




CO 




5-1 




5-1 


3 


3 rH 


o 


3 




■U 








CU 


13 


CO 




CO 




oo o 


u 


o 


CO 


CO 






^3 


o 






r-! 


r| 


CU 






e 


O 0) 


to 


jH 




OJ 








r-l 


•H 


5^ 




X 




d 




5-1 




O 


Pi 


3 


CO 


5-1 


o 


CU 




0) 


4H 


Xi 




CO 


< 


4-1 > 


•H 


^ 


(U 


>. 5-1 


U 






>,^ 


W 


>^ 


o 




•H 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 




d 


CO 


CO 


:s 


4-1 




•H 


•H 


o 


CO 


3 




4-1 <U 


!-i 


•H 


^-^ 


4-1 O 


(U 






O 


o 




CO 


(U 


5-1 


rH 


r-{ 


PQ 






3 


3 


CO 


4-1 




d 




CO 


5 


4-1 


CO 


s 


p 


O S-I 


fa 


X 


(U 


5-1 J 


CO 


3 




u 




P 


13 


^ 


<U 


•H 


r-^ 




T3 


X 


^ 


P 


0) 


4-1 


•H 


CO 


4-1 




-3 


(U 









o a 






<u 


3 


3 


3 






5-4 




•H 




CO 


CO 


CU 


rH 


!-i 


4J 


O 




en 


< 


CU 


1—i 


CO 


^ 


CU 


^ 


X 


Xi 


3 




3 


QJ 


4-1 


00 <U 


5-1 


OJ 




CO 


5-1 


o 


iH 


5 


o 


S 


Xi 


<u 


CO 


CU 


•-) 


CU 






s 


CO 


O 


o 


hJ 


fu 




4-1 


O 


>. CO 


•H 


3 


en 


a rH 


fa 


E 


pj 


CU 


CO 


•H 


rH 


(U 


iH 




CO 


CO 


5 


Xi 




•H 


(U 


>, 




o 


> 


•H 






r^ 


(U 


CO 


(U <u 


e 


3 




iz: o 




o 


s 


g 


4J 


5-1 


CO 


J 


P^ 


rH 


5-1 


Xi 


73 


CO 


5-1 


5-1 


•H 


3 


0) 




o 


5-1 


3 


TJ 


^ 


^ 


a 


Xi >, 


3 


Id 


d 


CJ 


3 


o 


3 


CO 


en 


CO 


PC 


4-1 




3 


< 


o 


W 


N 


CU 


CO 


5-1 


O 


OJ 


rH 


d 


4-1 


3 


•H 


3 


3 


3 


3 a; 


•r-) 




d 


>N -H 


^ 




IZ 


►-3 




X 




4J 


CO 


CO 




•H 




•H 


Xi 


S 


g 


Xi 


l-J 


3 





3 


< 


> 


X 


N 


rJ 


fa t^ 


d 


CU 


<; 


CU 2: 


O 


d 






rd 




3 


1 


(U 


PL, 


(V 


X 


d 


rH 


PL 




4-1 




3 


i-i 


P^ 




3 


B 


•H 






(U 


•H 




5 


•-D 


d 


en 


-3 


CO 


o 


3 


PQ 




,-\ 




CO 


w 


o 


g. 




3 


CO 


Ph 


Ph 




3 


P 


•H 


rH 


^ 


CO d 


PQ 


d 


0) 


(U <u 




< 


•• 


U 


d 


iH 


<d 






+J 


rH 


CO 


J3 




4-1 


T-\ 


< 


CO 






4-1 


O 




t^ 


w 


•H 


OJ QJ 




3 


■H 


p d 


:s 




P 


CO 


d 


I-H 




d 


>. 


5-1 


<u 


•H 


4-1 


CO 


CD 


rH 


(U 




CO 


CO 


x: 


5-1 


O 


u 






3 


rH ^ 


d 


X 


5-1 


d 


<u 


•H 


hJ 


^ 


CO 


•H 


CO 


•H 


rH 


<U 


^ 


d 


CO 


^ 


•H 


O 


x: 


d 


•H 


•H 


CO 


<U 


CU 


4J 


>. 


3 


00 


S-I PL 


o 


PL 


QJ 


<U 3 


M 


5-1 


M 


U 


CO 


6 


CO 


> 


r-l 


X 


CJ 


d 


3 


3 


^1 


^ 


o 


x: 


rH 


3 


5-1 


X 


Xi 


o 


5-1 


5-4 


•H 


3 0) 


$-1 


CU 


rH 


rH "H 


13 


5j 


K 


•H 


3 


CO 


•H 


(U 


CU 


O 


•H 


<u 


O 


CO 


^ 


CO 


5 


o 


(U 


O 


CO 


O 


OJ 


o 


CO 


3 


^ 


4= 4-1 


3 


4J 


3 


>. 5-4 


3 


CU 


u 


Pi 


en 


o 


hJ 


W 


^ 


Pi 


:s 


p 


>-) 


hJ 


U 


a 


•^ S 


hJ 


en 


Pi 


Pi 


en 


O 


en 


<3 


o en 


< 


en 


> 


t^ <: 


< 


t=^ 



rH V£) 

>^ >^ 
rH r-{ 

3 3 
•-) 1-3 



rH rH rH 

3 3 3 

•d "^ •-) 



O vD r^ 
CN) <N CN 



^ >^ >. >^ >. 



3 3 
1-3 >-) 



3 3 3 
T) "-3 •-) 



O ro o CO 

rHr-100C0O>rHrHrHrH 

4J4-I4-I4-I4-I.U4-I4-I4-I 
COCOCOCOCOCOCDCOCO 

333333333. . 
ooooooocooooooooocoooooo 

333333333 





in o (N 












00 rH CS CN 






CN 'X! 


00 


o en x> 


5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1 


r^. 


r-! 


CO Cn rH rH 


T—i 


CN CM CM 


<U <U CU (U 












^ ^ ^ X 


u 


5-1 


S-I 5-1 5-1 ^4 


S-I 


4-14-14-1 


6 E e e 


CU 


O 


OJ 0) 0) O 


a; 


eo CO CO 


0) 0) (U 0) 


X 


Xi 


X X Xi X 


X 


3 3 3 


4J 4-1 4-1 4-1 


o 


o 


O o o 


o 


00 00 00 


PL PL PL a 


4-1 


4J 


4-1 4-1 -Ul 4-1 


u 


3 3 3 


CU (U 0) OJ 


o 


o 


CJ o o o 


a 


< < < 


:/i u:i ui vi 


o 


o 


o o o o 


o 



165 







V4 




















<u 




















M-l 














CO 






U-4 








bO 


CO 


0) 


•H 




X 


Cfl 






•H 


C 


(U 


x 


4-) 




4-) 


X 


e 




^ 


•H 


^ 


o 


>-i x; 




•H 


o 


CO 




CO 


> 


CO 


CO 


d 4-1 




e 


en 


X 


QJ 


o 


U 


u 


c 


U -H 




C/3 




CO 


C 


^ 


M 


t^ 


CO 


B 






• 


y^ 


O 


o 






PC 


• CO 






o 


00 o 


Oi 


• 


• 




[J-l 




o 




c 


O 




> 


S 


• 








(U 


M 


s 


• 






hJ 


C Ji 




c 


•H 






w 


OJ 


c 




cu 




CO 


}-i 


c 


• 




c 


CO 


iH 


dJ CO 




m 


(rt 


c 


Pm 


CO 


CU 


CO 


•H 


>-l >-l 




3 


^ 


>. 




QJ 


^ 


3 


CO 


D >, 




cn 


CO 


eJ 


(D 
C 


ID 


M 


(72 


o 


3^ 




-a 


^ 


T3 


CO 


c 


T3 


X) 


T3 


T3 




c 


C 


>-> 


< 


c 


C 


c 


X) C 




cd 


'O 


CO 


t3 


^3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C CO 
CO 




• 


c 


• 


C 


C 


• 


• 


• 






fe 


CO 


H 


CO 


CO 


< 


s 


<: 


< 


CO 


x; 


. 


iH 


. 


S 


d 


c 


c 


H 


u 


p=i 


(U 


pL. 


CO 


(U 


<u 


OJ 


C J-i 




(U 




CO 




•H 


X 


X 


X 


<V CO 


W 


c 


c 


X 


c 


rH 


a 


a 


a 


> X 


Di 


c 


x 


a 


X 


tH 


0) 


<u 


(U 


<u o 


< 


QJ 


o 


•H 


o 


•H 


■U 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 'H 


a. 


Ni 


<-> 


s 


<-> 


:s 


CO 


CO 


cn 


CO pc; 



5-1 

4J CO 

CJ O 

z 

O CO <U 

4J e rH 

>. U-i ,H 

OJ 3 QJ 

fi. CO 42 

U -H 



tU 



1-1 CO D- W 

CO U O 4J 

c_) 4-1 a> 4-1 

>^ CO 00 QJ 

CO O -H >-. H 

CO C >-i O 3 

•H CO x: o) CO 

hJ 2 C_> cj; hJ 



o 

CO 

0) a. 

c e 

C >. o ci 

O CO X O 
T3 ^ H 4-1 



00 3 
O H 

CO 
<U (U 

•H 1-1 
J-i ^1 
CO CO 

IS X 



c 

>-i 0) 

OJ o 

Cu X) 

O >-i 

4-» O 

CO M-l 

•H X) 

>-i CO 

U PQ 



o o 



r>. ctn \£> O 

CN f— I I— I C^l CO 



r-^ CO r^ 

rO iH CN (N 





)-l M }-l 


>- >-. 


1-1 >-l }-l >-4 


>-l 


oj oj a; 


OJ 01 


0) 0) QJ 01 


(U 


X> J3 X3 


J3 XI 


X X X X 


X 


B £ E 


B B 


E E E E 


o 


1) (U 0) 


(U QJ 


OJ QJ (U (U 


4J 


> > > 


> > 


CJ O O CJ 


'J 


o o o 


o o 


<U QJ <U (U 


o 


z z; z 


z z 


Q O O Q 



166 







. 








. 












bO 






d 
























o 




CM 








P^ 












M 






(U 
























w 
























d 






0) 
























M 




•-3 




4:: 




►-^ 




CO 




TJ 




en 






d 

d 





T3 




d 




T3 








d 


CO T3 


<r 




>v 









•\ 




p5 









CO 


en 













Pi 









p-i 




d 


d 


S 




W 




c 




w 













> 


.-I 


























>. 


t^ 






C 




•H 




c 




• 




:s 




w 







• 




^ 








:s 




• 




,—1 


^ 


s 




•H 




!x! 




•H 




S 














>-> 








S 








•-) 




fe 


s 






iH 








iH 








• 




• 


• 
















• 












g 




rH 




• 




iH 




(U 




ej 




P^ 


X 




CU 




J 




(U 




hJ 




•> 






hJ 




O 




P:. 

































CJ 








5^ 




P3 


S 






o 








a 




d 




u 




x) 


-o 




d 




^ 




d 




■p 




CO 






■u 


>> 






a) 


CO 








(1) 




5-1 




5-1 


iH 




<D 




5-1 




<u 




5-1 




E 




U 


en s-i 


cq 




• 


00 


(U 




t 


Td 


g 


^3 


(U 




£? 





T3 


g 


T) 


(U 


TS 


g 


TD 


<D 









(U ^ 


(U 13 <U 






w 


^3 


e 




w 


>H 


rH 


,0 




& >. 


d 


r-\ 


I— 1 


^ 


t-H 


iH 


^ 






-ii 


rH 4J 


s ^ ^ 


Q 


c 




•H 


CO 


c 




0) 


CO 


0) 





^ 


T3 U 


5-1 


<V 


CO 


(U 





(U 


CO 


o; 





^.-o 


iH 


;>. d 


CO 0) 


s 


O 


u 


5-1 


>-) 





M 


•H 


^ 


•H 


c^ 


C3 


W 3 


<d 


•H 


hJ 


•H 


Pi 


•H 


^J 


•H 


Pi 





0) 





H 


^ -H Pi 


^ 


)>i 





rO 




u 


3 


W-l 




<+-i 




CO 


,Q 




M-l 




M-l 




M-( 




M-l 




d 


e 


<+-( 




14-1 




5 


rfl 


B 


• 


CO 


x: 


^3 


• 


TJ 


• 


x; 


• -a 


• 


T3 


• 


TS 


• 


TJ 


• 


13 


• 


•H 


CO 


5-1 


. 73 . 


w 


4-1 


rt 


> 


,1=; 


■M 


CU 


> 


OJ 


> 


CO 


> 3 


> 


<U 


> 


CU 


> 


^ 


> 


(U 


> 


3 


j= 





> CU 


> OJ > 


pcj 


C/D 


>-l 


U 


(U 


W 


^ 


S 


<u 


S 


<u 


2 


CU (/I 


d) 


S 


<U 


S 


0) 


s 


(U 


s 


<u 


o- 





2 


(U ^ 


<u s <u 


w 




< 




Pi 




<: 




c^ 




Pd 




Pi 


Pi 




P3 




Pi 




Pi 




Pi 




s 




Od 


P!J Pi 


S 


C 




c 




C 




C 




c 




d 


c 




d 




d 




d 




d 




d 




d 


d 


d 



U. 
Q 
LU 



a 

LU 
O 

cr 

o 
o 

LU 

cr 

LU 
CD 

< 

cr 

< 



O 

















































d 


d 
























































CO 


CO 








X 
















































5-1 


5-1 








4-100 


w 






5-1 




M 




































M 


M 








d 5j 5-1 


u 


13 


13 


<U 


13 


CU 


13 


13 


13 




13 


13 




13 


13 








13 




13 










T) 


13 


13 


000 


;z; 


1—) 


rH 


4-J 


rH 


4-1 


tH 


rH 


iH 




rH 


^ 




,-{ 


rH 




OJ 


13 


rH 




7-\ 






•s 


«> 


iH 


r-i 


rH 


E X3 XI 

^ 0) <u 


w 


CU 


CU 


cn 


(U 


cn 


<U 


(U 


0) 




0) 


o; 


4-1 


CU 


CU 


d 


rH 


5-1 


0) 


E 


CU 


cn 


cn 


d 


d 


<U 


<U 


CU 


Q 


•H 


•H 


CU 


•H 


0) 


•H 


•H 


•H 


!-i 


•H 


•H 


d 


•H 


•H 











•H 


CO 


•H 


•H 


•H 


CO 


CO 


•H 


•H 


•H 


a; rH rH 


M 


4-1 


M-l 





"4-1 


CJ 


<4-l 


M-l 


<4-l 


(U 


14-1 


14-1 


CO 


IW 


IH 


4-J 


P.M-I 


U-^ 


-d 


IH 


rH 


rH 


5-1 


u 


"4-1 


>4-J 


V4-I 


IS 13 13 


CO 


13 


13 


5-1 


13 


5-1 


13 


13 


13 


> 


13 


13 


x: 


13 


13 


d 


r-^ 


rH 


13 


13 


13 


rH 


rH 


Xi 


Xi 


13 


13 


13 


13 13 


H 


(U 


<U 





<U 





CU 


<U 


CU 





(U 


CJ 


CO 


0) 


CU 


CO 


CO 


•H 


CU 


(U 


<U 


•H 


•H 


CU 


<u 


<U 


(U 


CU 


• -H -H 




s 


d 


^ 


s 


N 



•H 

(U 
•H 





M 
M 
M 


s 




4J 


rH 


S 


2 


s 


S 


CJ) 


15 


(U 

a 

5-1 


d 
CO 


Q 




•-) 


cn 


H 


•s 

13 

CO 
N 
•H 


S 


S 


S 


mini E 
or M 
ski M 




4-1 


(j-i 






^ 


rH 


d 


d 


4-1 


rH 












CO 





00 




<u 


rH 


4-t 




d 


d 






•H -H 5-1 




4J 


IW 










•H 








•H 


(U 












x: 


CO 


w 




d 


rH 


5-4 







CO 






rH H 














CO 


hJ 


cn 


d 


> 


[3 


CO 


^ 


^ 


5-1 


d 


cn 


4-t 









(U 


OJ 


d 


4J 




d 


E 


0) 13 




•H 


W 




*e 


5-J 


OJ 


5-i 


d 


CO 


(U 


rH 


(U 


d 


(U 





13 


d 


• 




Pi 


5 


,Q 


CO 


cn 


g 








CO a CO 




rH 






^ 


CO 


Q 


(U 


CO 


0) 


2: 


d 


^ 


CO 


,£i 


4J 


CO 


CO 


S 






rH 





> 








4-1 


5-1 


d 1-0 




iH 


• 


ts 


iH 


W 




13 





h-3 




d 


d 


5-1 


B 


d 


5-1 


CO 




u 


• 





Pi 


CO 


:s 


u 


r-{ 


4-1 


. CO 




W 


s 


d 


CO 




• 


d 






• 


d 


d 


p^ 


CJ 


CO 


PQ 




(U 


>sU 


U 




rH 






•H 


cn 


< 








CO 


P^ 


• 


PC 


CU 


>^ 


• 


<3 


CO 


pp 




Pm 


4J 




• 


d 


u 






• 


-d 


X 


• 


E 


^ 


• < 




• 


CO 


I— 1 




Pw 




w 


T-i 


W 




W 




• 




CO 


• 


< 


•H 




>% 


• 


<d 


CO 


QJ 


P-I 


CO 


w 


>.< 




W 


4-1 





d 




CU 




u 




QJ 




(U 


m 


• 




W 




13 


• 


^ 


Pi 




pL, 


5-1 




ffi 




r-{ r-\ 






■M 


« 


CO 


>^ 


5-1 


. 


CU 


13 





• 


d 




!i^ 


• 




cn 


CO 


•-) 


4-1 




rH 




CO 


>^ 




• 


U >. >. 




■u 


<U 




•H 


<u 


>H 


Pd 


43 


5-< 


•H 


P 


d 


» 




:2 


>^ -H 


d 







(U 





N 


ax: 


T-i 


w 


CU (U 5-1 




5-1 


5j 


13 


> 


rH 


CO 




g 


CO 


d 




CO 


rs 


d 




5-1 


CJ 


u 


5-1 


^ 


00 


U 


•H 


x 


4J 


•H 




> 5-1 (U 


M 


CU 





•H 


•H 


d 


rH 


d 


•H 


^ 


CO 





•H 




d 


d 


S 


d 


<u 


CU 





5-1 


CO 


^ 


^ 





CO 


d 


CU M-l X 


§ 


^ 


hJ 


> 


> 


CO 


u 


X 


t^ 





•d 


•H 


Q 


>^< 


^ 


CO 


m 


bo n 





u 




B 


c:3 


X 


pq M-1 U 


^ 







CO 




4J 









•H 




5-1 




CO 









5-1 









(U 




CO 




•H 







(U 


2 


Pi 




Q 




CO 




•-D 




Pi 




W 




•d 




"-1 




r^ 




Pi 




a 




liii 




H 




I-) 


•-: 









<r 


rH 


r^ 






















^ 


r~- 


r-^ 


CN 


CN 






















CN 
































>~. 


>, 


>. 


>. 




CN 


fO 










>^ 


<!• 


in 




!>^ 


5-1 


5-1 


U 


5-1 


vX 


r-i 


rH 


CN 


CN 


C30 


r-^ 


CN 


CN 




5-1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






















CO 


d 


d 


d 


d 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


rH 


^ 


rH 


r-i 


W 


d 


5-1 


S-i 


5-1 


5-1 





CJ 





a 


a 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


H 


d 


XI 


X 


X 


X 


5-J 


M 


V4 


5-1 


5-1 


5-1 


5-1 


5-1 


V4 


<: 


CO 


(U 

ft, 


CU 


CU 


0) 


^ 


^ 


1 


§ 


CO 


a 


a 


0- 

< 


< 



167 



Q 




CO 








. 








a. 
















Ph 












pL. 
























U 




c 








>-) 








































r-^ 












CO 




CO 


CO 


M 




•H 












c 
















!-i 












>-i 




• 




r-{ 




T3 








0) 




)-t 


u 


ai 




M 








•> 




c 




'D 




c 








QJ 




n 








(U 




•-5 




1 




rH 








c 




(U 


(U 


pi 




60 




13 




•H 




>% 








c 




c 




>^ 








OJ 




p^ 















OJ 




•H 




Td 


T3 


2 




•H 









c 




rH 




»> 




>. 




o 




CO 




»> 




M 




CO 




r^ 




X 




:s 




rH 




CO 




C 


C 


^ 




E 




:i 




•H 




P^ 




en 




rH 




g 




H 




3 




u 




H 




CO 
c 




CO 

< 




CO 

•H 




o 




tj 




CO 

rH 


CO 
t-H 


S 




• 








cfl 








•H 








CO 








X 




pq 








•H 








M 




o 




. 




I^H 


Pm 


o 




n 




J 








u 




t— 1 
1— 1 




o 




PC 




< 




CO 




. 




< 




rH 




33 




o 








< 








^ 








4J 




^ 




CO 




O 




4-1 




s 




4-1 




o 




5J 




4-1 




O 
O 




T3 




< 




S: 


E 


CO 




s 


S 


>^ 




fl 




>-l 








•H 








u 








u 


>-l 






T3 




}-l 








rH 








CO 


CO 


t-H 




TS 


t3 


CQ 




X 


T3 


0) 




• 




M 




• 


T3 


0) 


T3 


c 


-o 


0) 


CJ 


• 




•H 


^3 


QJ 




• 


T3 


CO 


^3 


c 


T3 


q; 


x: 


>-• 


'O 


tH 


TJ "H 




■u 


o 


tH 


^ 


•a 


<: 




rH 




w 


rH 


^ 


rH 


x: 


rH 


XJ 


4-1 


^ 




> 


T-\ 


X5 




w 


O 


c 


iH 


x: 





a 


00 


CO 


rH 


> 


rH > 


Q 


4J 


•H 


(U 


o 


o 




>^ "H 


c 




(U 


o 


CD 


o 


(U 


o 


CO 




C 


CO 


(U 


o 


c 







o 


<U 


o 


o 


CO 


C 


^ 


OJ 


CO 


<U CO 


5 


(U 


s 


•H 


fiJ 




4-1 


CO 


3 


o 


!-- 


•H 


ai 


•H 


•-3 


•H 


Pd 


0) 


U) 


O 


Q 


•H 


^ 


o 


>-l 


^ 


Q 


•H 


•-) 


5 


t^ 


•H 


o 


•H 


o 


•H O 


^ 


»-l 




M-l 




^ 


U 


5 




^ 


3 


tH 




14-I 




U-4 




o 


CO 


4J 




M-l 




>-l 


3 


4J 




<4-l 




4-1 




e 




MH 




Uh 




0) 


• 


na 


• 


}_i 


0) 


TJ 


• 


CO 


XI 


t3 


• 


ns 


• 


MS 


• 


u 


6 


T-\ 


• 


Td 




CO 


x: 


CO 


. 


Td 


• 


CO 


• 


CO 


. 


'O 


. 


Td • 


w 


> 


> 


q; 


> 


o 


42 


Q) 


> 


-C 


■U 


(U 


> 


0) 


> 


0) 


> 


o 


o 


•H 


> 


OJ 


> 


X 


4J 


0) 


> 


0) 


> 


CD 


> 


u 


> 


(U 


> 


(1) > 


Cii 


w 


0) 


S 


(U 


z 


O 


2 


<u 


C/3 


^-1 


S 


<u 


s 


(U 


s 


OJ 


12 


X. 


s 


53 


S 


(U 


C/3 


5-1 


:2 


QJ 


s 


0) 


12 


OJ 


p^ 


(U 


s 


(1) 


S QJ 


W 




« 




lai 




Pti 




(Si 




< 




oi 




p:: 




Pi 




H 




Pi 




Pi 




< 




Pi 




pi 




c^ 




Pi 




Pi 


c^ 


5 


c 




C 




c 




C 




c 




c 




c 




c 




d 




c 




c 




C 




c 




C 




C 




c 




c 




c 



w 






u 


^3 


-a -o -o -o 


2 


r-\ 


4J rH rH »H rH 


w 


<u 


4-1 QJ QJ 0) QJ 


Q 


•H 


QJ tH -H iH tH 


M 


M-l 


}^ 14-1 M-l U-l (4-1 


C/3 


^3 


QJ TD TJ T3 tJ 


a 


QJ 


> QJ QJ QJ QJ 


Pi 


2 


W S S S S 



rH rHQJrHrHrHrH<;OrH 

QJ>^QJrHQJQJQJQJ OQ) 

•H CO *H O "H -H 'H 'H CO [5 "H 
14-1 [S^ ei-'4-<l4-(M-lM-l'H4-ll4-l 
'0'T3'OrH'0'OT3'T3'T3 COid 
QJQJQJCOQJQJQJQJ'OQJQJ 

ss2:2ssss<3:2S 













X! 


z 






0) 










u 








QJ 










^ 


n 






J-t 










s 


CO 






4-1 












iH 






c 




a 


c 




« 


rH 




c 


•H t3 




o 


O n3 'O 13 


C 


T3 13 


13 T3 -H no 


Ou 13 


O 73 


CO rH 




4-1 


4J rH rH rH 


•H 


a ^ 


O rH ffi rH 


rH 


+J r-\ 


>-i QJ 


C 


CO 


CO QJ Q) QJ 


rH 


CO QJ 


O QJ QJ 


^4 QJ 


CO QJ 


pq -H 


O 


•H 


•H "H -H tH 


M 


r-\ -H 


5 -H 4-1 'H 


x: -H 


•H -H 


4-4 


4-1 


rH 


rH <4-l M-l M-l 


c 


4-1 U-l 


4J U-l >-| LM 


4-1 M-l 


rH U-l 


^ ^3 


CO 


rH 


rH TJ Td 73 


CO 


CO t3 


CO 13 O TJ 


C 13 


rH 13 


Q) Q) 


o 


O 


O Q) QJ 0) 


J-l 


QJ QJ 


QJ QJ X QJ 


•H QJ 


O QJ 


2 S 


pq 


K 


K :s S S 


PH 


:2 s 


rs S C/3 IS 


:s. s 


X s 





















M 




(-4 


























































M 




)-l 
























>. 


















• 
















M J^ 


>^ 


QJ 






















rH 


■P 












<U iH 






J-i 


o 












rH 


73 


>-i 


•H 




QJ 








>^ 


c 








T-i 


M 












WJrH 






•-3 


1 






<u 






rH 


CO d 


3 


Ph 




3 








QJ 


QJ 




rH 


QJ 


•H 


QJ 












TJ QJ 












c 






'H 


73 CO 


^ 






U 


QJ 






rH 


•H 




rH 


4-i 


&0 


d 








QJ 




•H d 






«\ 


QJ 


QJ 




o >^ 


d 




t>0 rH rH 


CO 


• 




H 


rH 


QJ 


rH 


J2 


P- 




o 


CO 


I-* 


d 


Q) 






CX 




>-i d 






13 


tH 


CO 


5 


4J CO 4-1 


o 




d 


O P3 


bO 


4-J 


5 




CO 


u 


rH 


>. CJ 


3 




a 


e 


QJ 


o 


4-1 


J-i 




O 


Q 


M O 






C 


CO 


U 


CO 


J-l t«i 4-1 


CO 


d 


QJ 


^ . 


d 


C/3 


QJ 


• 


QJ 


o 


O 


^ 4-J 


hJ 


QJ 


CO 


4-1 


^ 


>-4 u 


CO 


QJ 


Q) 


PH 


3 


CO CJ 


a 




C8 


p.. 


o 




QJ a -H 


r-l 


•H 


4J 


•H 




J3 


kJ 


u 


o 


O 


CO 3 




QJ 


•H 


rH 


O 


o 


X 


13 


O 




X! 


rH a 


u 




r— 1 




2 


W 


« S > 


QJ 


4-1 


4-1 


QJ tJ 


fc^ 


QJ 


CJ 




CO 


s 


CO 


d >-i 




O 


>-i 


QJ 


•H 


T-i 


X 


d 


d 


. 


^ 


u x: 


CO 




QJ 


• 






CO 


z 


J-l 


QJ 


Pi 




•H 


CO 


QJ 


CO 




•H 


•H U 


< 


O 


o 


t^ 


Pm 


>. "-D 


<J 


QJ 


CO 


I-) 


1-1 




x: 




U 


2 


• 


. 


. . QJ 




CO 


Ph 


}-i 


. 


>-i 


rH 


d 


CO 


. 


5-1 






s 








CO 




P. hJ 




O 


• • 


C/D 




(— 1 




PC 


u 


< 2 hJ 


CO 


2 




. OJ 


< 


CO 


QJ 


•H 


u 


(^ 


Q 


O • 


CO 






. 


CO 


H CO 


. 


CO 




x 


o 


►J Pi 








QJ 








4-1 




QJ 


flH M-l 




S 


PQ 


4-1 








PC tc 


M 


. 


pq 


:s 


QJ 


4H 


< 




• 


CO 






QJ 




. 


c 


CO 


CO 


>. CO . 


U 


13 


d 


•H 


E 






CO 


o 


4-1 


rH 




CO 


W 






O 


. >-l 




QJ 


pL. 


Vj 


. 


>^ S 


d 




:5 


c 


CO 


13 


C 13 O 


QJ 


M 


d 


>-i d 


CO 


d 


d 


•H 


•H 


QJ 


QJ 


d u 


X 




CO 


4-J 


d 


hJ QJ 


CO 


•H 




o 


12 


13 CO 


d 






CO 


r-l 


d 


9g.c 


^ 


CO 


CO 


QJ d 


•H 


CO 


•H 


U 


d 


d 


CO 


CO 3 


>-i 


CO 


4-1 


>^ 


CO 


X 


1 


>-i 


d 


X 




d -H 


CO 


^ 


r; 


o 


to -H 


C 


x: 


•H 


4-1 QJ 


rH 


QJ 


U-l 


X. 


QJ 


CO 


X 


O XI 


CO 


QJ 


•H 


QJ 


V4 


r^ O 


CO 


o 


QJ 


d 


QJ r-\ 


o 




n 


►n 




hJ 


4-1 hJ x: 


Pi 


u 


o 


rH »-3 


rH 


•-5 


CO 


CJ 


B 


>-> 


O 


•-) rH 


P3 


e 


Pi 


X 


plH 


O Pi 


o 


S 


4J 


Q 


X 


[2 rH 


^-) 


< 


Q 




6 




d o 




•H 




CO 


•H 




QJ 




o 




•H 


•H 




rt 




O 




CO 


X 




rH 




o 


•H 




Z 


•— ; 




o 




< "-J 




Pi 




:2 


rs 




2 




Q 




X 


[2 




"-) 




Pi 




•n 


H 




W 




l-D 


12 





CM 


CN 


o 


O 


CN 


in 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CN 


CNJ 


ro 


m 


























QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


Q) 


QJ 


>. 


>-. 


>. 


>^ 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


CO 


^ 


^ 


^ 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


Z 


>-: 


•n 


>-) 


►^ 


•-3 


•-^ 


•-) 


»-) 



168 



g 








>> 








•n 






































. 






M 








4-1 












Ph 


































•-3 






g 




c 








c 




•H 








d 




d 








d 






>. 




M 








. 




■g c 


g 




o 




2 




o 




d 




t-j 




o 




>^ 








o 


iH 




j-i 




<u 




>. 




>^ 




QJ O 




c 




a 




d 




•H 








d 




O 




o 




d 


.-1 




V4 




01 




}-i 




cu 




0) d 






d 




s 




d 




U 




r. 




d 




u 




^ 




d 


O 




CO 




> 




o 




.H 




i^ d 


s 




cd 








CO 




CO 




(U 




CO 








>-l 




CO 


O 




PQ 




(U 




rH 




^ 




CO 


o 




PS 




. 




H! 




M 




T3 




p:^ 








•H 




P3 










Q 




Ph 




e 




P3 


g 








Pm 








!-i 




CO 








Q 




^ 






-d . 




• 












o 




2 




. 








• 




0) 




:s 












o 




• 


oo w 




I-: 




-o 




d 




u 










s 




X 




s 




U^ 








s 




'V 








S 


p 








u 




O 




H 




>. IS 


>-" 








a- 




















r-\ 




!-i 






o >^ 




T3 




CO 




-o 








(U 


£ 


T3 


d 




0) 


-o 


d 




. 


OJ 


s 


T3 


d 




CO 




Q) 




d 


»-l M 




•H 




x: 




rH 






'O 


rH 73 d 




rH 


X 




m 


iH 


ji: 


TJ 


<; 


■u 




tH 


x: 




d 




■U 




X 


o >-- 




> 




G 


4J 


(U 


e 


CO 


iH 


d rH ^ 


Q 


CU 


o 




o 


<u 


o 


o 




CO 


g 


Q) 


o 


d 


o 


d 


QJ 


d 


o 


Xi CO 


d 


CO 


d 


•H 


Cfl 


x 


CO 




<U 


•H (U O 


2 


•H 


i-j 


u 


•-3 


•H 


I-: 




4-1 


3 


fl 


•H 


*-) 


OJ 


Pi 


o 


Ph 


o 


»-) 


X X 


o 


Q 


o 


Pd 


>-l 


CO 


^ 


X 


•H 


|i^ -H 1-3 


<3 


1+-I 




o 




<4-l 




g 


M 


■u 


•H 


M-l 




T3 




■U 




4-1 




4J 


4J 




4-1 




(U 




4J 


a 


M-i 


(4H 




TJ 


• 


> 




T3 




(U 


•H 


1— 1 


TJ 


. 


I— 1 


• 


CO 


• 


CO 


• 


3 • 


CO 


• 


CO 


• 


^ 


• 


iH 


0) 


T3 


. -o . 


M 


OJ 


> 





> 


OJ 


> 


o 


^ 


O 


1— ( 


QJ 


> 


CO 


> 


o 


> 


o 


> 


o > 


o 


> 


o 


> 


1 


> 


CO 


CO 


(U 


> 0) > 


P^ 


s 


OJ 


Q 


OJ 


s 


aj 


z 


o 


CD 


•H 


s 


OJ 


s 


<u 


PQ 


OJ 


PQ 


0) 


C/3 0) 


CQ 


OJ 


PQ 


<U 


(U 


IS 


o 


IS 


0) S <u 


W 




Pi 




e^ 




p£i 




p^ 




[2 




etj 




Pi 




Pi 




Pi 


Pi 




Pi 




Pd 




Pi 




>-) 




prj Pd 


5 


c 




C 




c 




d 




d 




d 




d 




d 




d 




d 


d 




d 




d 




d 




d 


d 





CO X 










CO M 










X -H 










dJ QJ 








w 


Eh W 








CJ 


'O TJ ^3 na T3 


'O td TJ 'O 


T3 


n3 T3 




T-{ ,-A '^ r-i r-\ r-{ 


r-\ & <U rH rH -d 


QJ r-\ 


rH rH 


Q) QJ CO <U CO <U <U 


d CJ rH rH OJ 0) ^ 


rH Q) 


6 OJ Q) 


p 


•H tH CO -H rd 'H -H 


O -H O -H -H O 


-H 


CO -H -H 


M 


CH M-t rH MH T3 UH Mh 


CO MH TJ fX y-i M-i MH 


CUMH 


,d UH UH 


CO 


^3 T) rH -13 (U 'O TS 


TD 73 d rH T3 13 TJ 


rH T3 


T3 T3 'C3 


w 


QJ QJ CO 0) <U 0) Q) 


3 0) CO CO <U QJ <U 


CO QJ 


QJ QJ QJ 


Pi 


S IS Q IS Z IS S 


ffi S (ii ^3 g s S 


& IS 


P IS IS 



QJ 



►> M-l 4-J <4H 

CO QJ O QJ 
Ei. IS PQ IS 



d 

o -a 

ij ^ 

CO QJ 

o -H 

« l+H 

13 

• QJ 

W 2 



13 TS rQ 



CO QJ 

}-i -H 

QJ tiH 

I ^ 



60 d 

d o 



1^ 



rH 5-1 T3 

>-i eg QJ 

<2 s s 



>> 










}H 






o ;>. 






rH 




























,Q 










•-^ 






CJ ^ 






QJ 






>^ 




r> 


















CO 
















CO 4J 






r^ 






Q) 

















d 






QJ 










r. 


p>^ 




•H U 




^ 


a 




>^ 


CO 




rH 








CJ 




•H 






•H iH 








14H 


•H 


QJ 




O CO 




o 


g 




d 


TJ 




rH 




CO 




•H 


CO 


CO 






d 00 








Mh 


^ 


> 




CO d u 




CO 


CO 




O CO 


d 




QJ 


>^ 


d 




j_l 


s 


^ 






CO O 




•H 


s 


•H 


CO 


O 


•H 


QJ CO O 


•H 


r^ 


o 




rC 4-1 


•H 




d 


CO 


<H 


-d 


60 Uh 


CO 


d 






•H 


CO 


d 


3 


rH 


^ 


33 


O 


-fi M 2 


CO 


rd 






CO ^1 


I-J 


>. 


CO 


O 


ri^ 


o 


d o 


•H 


QJ 




CO 


rH • 


4-i 


o 


+J 


s 


o 




d 


60 f=^ 


CO 


CO 


o • 


d 


S <D 




5-1 


60 




Sh 


•H 


•H 5-1 


rH 


Cu 




QJ 


60S 


u 


•H 


4J 


^ 


• 


d 


d Q) • 


4-1 


w 


CO W 


•H 


,Q 


• 


d 


>^ d 


• 


QJ 


rH 


d d 


t—\ 


CO 




rC 


CO 


QJ 


60 


^ 




u 


^ 


Pi 


33 p <: 


•H 




•1—) 


,Q 


. o 


Pd 


QJ 


QJ CO 


s 


Ph 


'C3 


d S 


•H 


w 




60 


O QJ 


rQ 


60 


• 


1 








Ph 


• 


CO QJ 


d 


<! Pi 




PC 


d S 






QJ 


QJ 


:2 




CO 


d 


d 


O 


CO 




s 


CO 


• 


d • CO 




< 


Cs! d 


Pi 




5-1 




QJ 


QJ 


• 


Pi 


X ' 




• 


^4 


K 


. 'H 


Pi 


S 


• 






•H 


P4 


QJ <; -H 


• 




•H 




d • 


QJ 


• 


QJ . 


d 


13 




J 


. 


ij 


Q) 




K^ 4-1 






M 


QJ 


• 


d 




QJ O 


P 


^ 


. 4-1 


• 


>^ »D 


Uh 


:s 


p ^ 


•H 




0) 


• 


•-n 




e 


0) 


CO 


to 


QJ 




d 


Ph 


•H 


rH 


rH >^ "H 




4J 


<; CO 


•^ 


5h 


•H 






CO 


4-1 


4-1 


J CD 




d 


QJ 


CJ 


4J .H 


CO 


CO 


T3 


d 




60 


QJ 


X QJ jH 


4J 


•H 


•H 




rd }^ 


d 


d 


>> +-1 


Sh 


4J 


CO 


•H 


X 


Q) 


P 


•H 


^ Sh 


iH 


•H 


JH 


CO 


d 


U 


CO 


4-1 rH 4-1 


^ 


T3 


d u 


QJ 


•u d 


d 


•H 


5-1 U 


5h 


O 


d 


>, 5h 


arH 




d 


QJ x: 


60 tH 


E? 


QJ 


•H 


•H 


rd 


CO d CO 


QJ 


d 


o ^ 


O 


CO ^ 


QJ 


4-1 


CO QJ 


o 


•H 


QJ 


5-1 O 


QJ 


QJ 


d 


CO 


rO U 


d 


W 


5 


•-) 


IS 


> 


o 


lid CO Ph 


rQ 


•-: 


jH CJ) 


d 


K^ AJ 


•-3 


5-1 


S rQ 


hJ 


^ 


Pd 


5h P 


CO 


K 


^ 


1-^ 





o 




^3 




TJ 




•H 


4-1 


o 




>. 


Vh 


}-4 




CO 


rH 




rH 




QJ 


o 




o 




e^ 


P 




W 




w 




S 


CO 


Pi 




S 


PQ 


< 




s 


< 




w 




H 


•-) 




>-> 

































CNI 


r>» 


r^ 




CT\ 


vO 


r^ 








o 


r-» 


r«« 


-^ 


in 


r-i 


rH 










rH 


CN 


<N 


CO 


CO 


(T) 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CN 


CM 


ro 


ro 


4J 
CO 


4J 
CO 


4-1 

CO 


w 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


?-, 


>> 


>. 


;^ 


>. 


>^ 


>. 


>^ 


>. 


^ 


d 


d 


d 


EH 


d 


d 


d 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


j-^ 


rH 


rH 


60 


60 


60 


< 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


p 


•-^ 


•d 


^^ 


•d 


•^ 


•-3 


t-D 


•-3 


>-> 


•d 


•-n 


^ 


•-3 


< 


<: 


< 



169 































V4 
































•-J 






































'^ 
































cn 










s 




pI 












. 












(0 

(U 












. 




















o 








d 












CO 




0-t 




CO 








XI 












PH 












C 








13 




CO 




CO 


M 




• 








}-i 








u 








e 








CO 
















o 








1— 1 




u 




oo 


s 




r) 








0) 




• 




a; 








o 








CO 




• 








X 




CO 








CO 




(U 




•H 












TD 




•-> 




XI 




X) 




o 




c 




o 




>-) 




c 




M 




M 




-XS 




4-) 




X) 




)-i 


g 




»> 








C 








d 




o 




o 




o 




u 








o 




3 




(U 




o 




CO 




c 




M 




Cfl 




C 




cfl 




•> 




Cfl 




o 








c 




CJ 




•^ 




c 




O 




XI 




o 




(-3 




CO 




o 






d 




« 




I— 1 




c 




iH 




:2 




• 




c 




u 




c 




d 




O 




C 




:2 








rH 




u 


s 




•H 




>^ 




U^ 




o 




li. 








fx. 




CO 




o 




o 




CO 








CO 








• 




P4 






o 




r— 1 




Oi 








CO 








• 








ffi 




2 




4-1 




K 




• 




CO 




• 




X 








• 


s 




O 




H 




S 




o 




S 




.J 

-U 




XI 

o 




s 




w 




CO 
CU 




S 








p 




4-1 








^ 




X) 


>i 






0) 






-ra 








TJ 




}-4 




LW 












eu 








cx 








>-l 




o 




XI 




d 


CQ 




• 


c 


i-l 


TJ 


•H 




• 


X) 


•H 


X) 


(U 


XJ 


^ 


T3 


d 


X3 


.H 


XI 




T3 


a 




CU 




I— 1 


XI 


<u 




^ 


X) 


•H 




3 






w 


•H 


3 


r^ 


> 


>.:3 


iH 


> 


1—1 


,Q 


I— ( 


CO 


.H 


x: 


rH 


3 


I— 1 


. 


iH 


x: 


>. 


CO 


>> 


3 


1—1 


X) 




4-» 


rH 


> 




g 


Q 


c 




i-H 


rt 


0) 


ca 


Vj 




CU 


cd 


0) 


O 


0) 


>-i 


(1) 


o 


CU 


CO 


CU 


•-) 


CU 


o 


>-l 


o 


>-l 


CO 


(U 


o 


C 


C 


CU 


CO 


d 


T3 


\Z 


o 


u 


^ 


PL, 


•H 


o 


3 


(U 


•H 


Q 


•H 


CIS 


•H 


c:; 


•H 


»-) 


•H 


PL. 


•H 




•H 


•-3 


3 


l-D 


3 


PL, 


•H 


PS 


O 


< 


•H 


Q 


o 


W 


^ 


M 


3 


O 




lJ-( 




^ 


60i4-( 




Mh 




<4-( 




»4-l 




^W 




<4-( 


>^M-l 




X 




x 




LH 




4-1 




"4-1 




•p 






CO 


X 


o 


• 


-a 


• 


TS 


>-i 


13 


• 


^3 




X3 


• 


X3 




XI 


. 


X) 


O 


13 


. 


X) 




13 




13 


. 


[3 




13 




CO 


• 


W 


x: 


4-) 


M 


> 


q; 


> 


3 


o 


o; 


> 


0) 


> 


CU 


> 


(U 


> 


<U 


> 


(U 


c 


(U 


> 


3 


> 


3 


> 


(U 


> 


CU 


> 


(U 


> 


o 


> 


P(J 


en 


VJ 


« 


Q) 


s 


0) 


CO 


CD 


2 


0) 


S 


0) 


s 


OJ 


S 


<u 


2 


a) 


s 


CO 


S 


CU 


CO 


<u 


CO 


<u 


s 


(U 


J2 


(U 


s 


QJ 


CQ 


55 


S 


C 


< 


C 


PS 


C 


»i 


c 


O 


C 


p=i 


c 


P^ 


c 


Pi 


C 


Pi 


a 


Pi 


c 


2 


c 


PS 


C 


Pi 


C 


Pi 


c 


PS 


C 


PS 


c 


pS 


c 


PS 













«i 






^ 






V4 
4-) 
















g 






Cu" 


s 




d 






w 






CU 




O CO 






00 


CO 




CU 






CJ 


X) 


13 


d XI 13 


X) 


V4 x: 13 


X3 13 


exlXJ^S 'Ol3'OXl 


X) XI 


43 X 13 




o -o 




13 


z 


iH 


O rH 


•H iH iH 


rH 


o d ^ 


iH iH 


COiHtHiH iHiHiHrH 


W rH 


C>0 rH iH 




iH 




,i<i iH 


w 


01 


(-1 CU 


iH (U CU 


(U 


X -H CU 


^ tU (U 


XJCUCUCUCOfUCUCUCU 


CU 


d <U CU 


CO 


d CU 


^ 


^ iH CU 


Q 


•H 


O -H 


^ 'H T-i 


•H 


X O -H 


CJ -H 'H 


CU -H "H -H -H -H -H -H -H 


U 'A 


•H -H -H 


•H 


O -H 


o 


O O -H 


1— 1 


"4-1 


X «+. 


O M-l 4-1 


M-l 


4-t 13 "4-1 


•H M-i Mh 


(3ml4-imrH>+-lM-|l4-l>4-l 


(U <4H 


g MH Uh 


tH 


4-1 LM 


•H 


•H MH 14H 


CO 


X3 


X 13 


O XJ XI 


13 


V4 5 T3 


4-1 XI XI 


OXIXI13.H13XIXIX) 


> XI 


CO 13 XI 


rH 


^ T3 


4-1 


4-t }-l 13 


w 


O 


C CU 


(-, (U CU 


(U 


O O CU 


CO CU <U 


4-»(U<UCU*HCUCUCUCU 


•H CU 


M CU CU 


•H 


CU <u 


CO 


CO O (U 


ps 


s 


f^ 2 


m S 2 


2 


z m S 


2 S S 


coSSSSSSSS 


PS S 


P4 s s 


S 


2: S 


2 


2 2 S 























u 
































•H 




rH 


















d 






•-3 








•^ 










d 




d 










rH 




O 














>^ 




o 








•H 






M 










•H 














tH 




4-1 






^ (U 








rH 




CO 






«. 


Pl. 




d 


o 










13 






4-> 






OJ 




CO 


•H 




4J ^ 








0) 




d 






>^ 


E 




d 


bO 


&0 








X 




rH 


d 


d 


4-t 




O 




•H 


rH 


r— 1 


u o 




>. 




OJ 


4-1 


CO 






rH 


CO 






OJ 


d 




•H 




o 




O 


o 


CO 


4-t 




•H 




M 


o 


01 


CO o 




u 


^3 


d 


d 


^ 






0) 


•H 




fi 


J-i 


•H 


CO 


^ 




o 




O 


CO 


>. 


QJ 




d 


d 


PQ 


p. 


>.13 


e o 


OJ 


u 


d 


d 


CO 


CO 




CO 


OJ 


O 




3 


CJ 


§ 


d 


CO 




o 




O 


>-l 


u 


d 


>% 


d 


o 




CO >^ 


CU d 


i-H 


:* 


o; 


CO 


o 


rH 




QJ 


d 


V-l 




OJ 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 










CO 


PQ 


d 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


• 


3 5 


to CO 


•H 


CO 


Ph 


tH 


o 


tH 


. 


X 


OJ 


o 


. 


^ 


PC3 


s 


o 


E 


r-\ 




. 


CO 


. 


hJ 


QJ 


QJ 


rH 


2 


4-1 


PS 


CL X 


12 <; 


o 




CU 




CO 


CO 


•H 


> 




;s 


CO 




p 


•H 


CO 


rH 


•-) 


3 


CO 




• XI 


FQ 


rH 




CO 




P 


E 






. 


M 


d 


O 




X 


CO 


. 




rH 


. 






CO 


•H 


rH 




XJ 




• 


PS >. 




OJ 


. 


12 


CO 




s . 


CO d 


. 


hJ 


M 


0) 




4-1 


o 


W 


IS 


OJ 


PQ 


S 


. 


. 




fQ 


OJ 


d 


CO 


CO 


o 


K 


. 


u< 


is: 




4-1 


• < 


o s 


CO (U 


CJ 






rH 


. 


OJ 


CO 






d 






PQ 


M 


. 




PQ 


01 


pL. 


•H 




>. 


PS 






• 


4-1 


•-3 




rH 0) 




x; 


, 


tH 


hJ 


>-l 




. 


d 


•H 


. 


01 






^ 


OJ 




OJ 




O 


QJ 


J=> • 




. 


CO 


Pi 


OJ 


QJ 


• CO 


60 1-1 


13 


4-1 


fXH 


OJ 




CO 


. 


o 


•H 


iH 


<: 


d 


E 


d 




rH 


. 


T-\ 


. 


•H 


V4 


4-J 3 


4-1 


> 


QJ 




•H 


rH CO 


Q -H 


3 X 


;-! 


•H 




•H 


13 


00 Ph 




e 


OJ 




d 


CO 


0) 


>^ 


o 


CO 


X. 


Ph 


M 


o 


o 


QJ 




X 


»-i 


U 


OJ -H 


1— t 


O 4-1 


CO 


XI 


0) 


U 


iH 


>-l 




d 


CO 


X) 


X 


CO 


•H 


u 


01 


U 




4-1 




4J 


XI 


>-l 4-1 


d 


d 


4-1 


3 


d 


CO d 


rH 3 


O CO 


x 


3 


O 


^ 


O 


s 


d 


d 


•1-) 


CO 


•H 


O 


iH 


CO 


> 


CO 


^ 


CO 


d 


CO 


o 


O 4J 


CO 


3 


,H 


X 


QJ 


X QJ 


3 -) 


u 


o 


•d 




1-1 


CO 


< 


d 


S 


> 


"-i 


rH 


ui 


>-l 


u 


>-l 


U. 


jd 


PL, 


QJ 


P O 


•-5 


CO 


< 


4-1 


PC 


O P 




, 


•H 




"^ 




0) 




-H 




OJ 




CO 




•H 




CO 




s 




o 




X 


a 




X 




>-l 




•H 


P^ 


o 


od 




PQ 




•-) 




< 




pq 




P 




^2 




vc 






»-) 




H 


CO 




CO 




<3 




S 





O 


tH 


tH 


r^ 


c» 


U 


>-l 


CN 


CN 


C30 


C7^ 


rH 


CN 


CN 










C-4 


rsi 


CN 


<M 


C^J 


OJ 


OJ 
















>-i 


>-i 


u 














x 


X 


U 


M 


u 


>-i 


u 


I-i 


>-l 


QJ 


QJ 


01 




4-1 


4-t 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


E 


E 


QJ 


OJ 


01 


OJ 


QJ 


QJ 


01 


X 


,0 


x 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


QJ 


01 


rO 


X 


X 


X 


x 


X 


Xi 


e 


(3 





U^ 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4-1 


4-1 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


QJ 


OJ 


QJ 


E- 


y> 


Ci 


t£ 


^ 


00 


D- 


CI- 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


4-1 


> 


> 


> 


< 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


0) 


01 


o 


CJ 


o 


o 


CJ 


o 


a 


O 


o 


O 


P 


■< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


CO 


CO 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


2; 


^ 


2: 



170 



Q 












. 


P4 


U 




rH 








PM 




H 




.H 










• 


Pi 




CU 








• 


^ 


pJi 




pq 




c 




'D 












o 






CO 






S 




1=1 




d 


d 


J5j 








cj 




o 


•H 


o 








ffi 




4-1 


iH 


§ 




W 








cn 


rH 

O 






0) 




S 




5-1 


U 


>-i 




C 








pL. 




PQ 




^ 


X) 


C 


-a 




. 






tH 


^ 


tH 


• 


pq 


Q 


c 


Q) 


QJ 


o 


QJ 


1^ 


C 


§ 


o 


•-) 


•H 


•-: 


•H 




O H 


4J 




>+-l 




4-1 


>^ 


J-i D 




CO 


• 


XI 


• 


X) 


o 


CtJ ^ 


S 


cd 


> 


(U 


> 


0) 


c 


^ -P 


w 


0) 


s 


0) 


s 


Cd 


CO u 


w 




Pi 




Pi 




Z 


< 


^ 


C 




c 




c 




c 

















o o 
















S ;s 


w 




a 






>% 




CO CO 


o 


XI 


o 


,i<5 


XI 


QJ 


XJ 


XI XI 


'Z 


tH 


4-1 


O 


iH 


iH 


tH 


§ § 


w 


0) 


cn 


O 


QJ 


CO 


QJ 


Q 


•H 


cd 


J-i 


•H 


QJ 


•H 


tH iH 


M 


m 


w 


^ 


M-l 


tH 


M-l 


j:i ^ 


CO 


XI 




tH 


XI 


tH 


M3 


o o 


W 


QJ 


. 


O 


QJ 


Q) 


QJ 


•H H 




S 


CO 


W 


Q) 
4-1 
4-) 
QJ 
C 


S 


4J 

QJ 


c 
o 

CO 
XI 
!-< 

Cd 

QJ 






^ 




QJ 




-H 


U ^ 






CO 


a 


3 




O 


O CO 




4-1 


cd 


QJ 


o 


•H 


4-1 


.H 




rH 


IS 


X) 




>-i 


U 


>~. • 




O 




K^ 


. 


QJ 


QJ 


Cd "-3 




U 


. 


Cd 


S rO 


M 


H 






< 


Pd 




•H 




^ 




. 






QJ 


H 


. 


. 4-) 




fH 


cd 


. 


c 




W 


W QJ 






X) 


s 


•H 


. 




^ 




rt 


c! 




iH 


•-> 


^ 


xJ Cd 




QJ 


•H 


XI 


QJ 




cd 


H N 




Xi 


CJ 


.H 


O 


CO 


>-i 


Cd -H 


|jD 


ex 


d 


Cd 


O 


•H 


Cd 


rd tH 


s 


QJ 


kJ 


c 


>-) 


:3 


CO 


o w 


^ 


4-) 




o 




o 




•H 


!z; 


CO 




pij 




hJ 




Pi 





o 


<r 


v£) 


<7> 




CM 


rvj 


CM 


CN 




>-l 


U 


U 


5-1 




QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 




•i 


■i 


•i 


•i 


w 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


QJ 


H 


> 


> 


> 


> 


< 


O 


O 


O 


O 


Q 


!z; 


a 


2 


^ 



171 



CN CN 00 00 00 CN 

rHCN|CNI<rOO-)mmrs|rHrH 



CO o> 
<Ti CN vD CN 



r-- <Ti -<r 

O -^ CN CN rH 



i-H-<3-<r-^OCNCNCN00tHtHCr>inrHtHrH0-)<fOtH^r0OOtH^Hm 



tHcocNcriOmmvomcsror^ooomLocNLo^OLOvoro^rOoovooro 
r^r^vX5vomcrioooor--r^Lni^r->cNmr^oovooovor-^cooLnrH^oooo 



Q 

UJ 
U. 

o 

UJ 



S j5 

o 
o 

UJ 

oc 

(0 

X 

I- 
< 

UJ 

o 







43 






c 
















C 








•H 
4J 






CO 
(U 




















CO 






o 
















O 








•H 






CO 




















o 






•H 
















•H 








C 






•H 


4-1 








^ 








00 


}-l 






+J 
















4-1 








O 






P 


CO 






rC 


o 




•H CU 




c 


0) 






O 








(U 








O 








•U 


!>^ 






a) CO 




4J 


a 


CU 




tH U 




3 


rH 






V^ 








CO 








M 






CO 


•H 


o 




4J 


U -H 




CO 


CO 


:z 




O 3 




hJ 


O 




c 


CO 








CO 








CO 






•H 


>-i 


C 




>.( 


>-l 4-1 




CO 


6 






X3 tH 






CO 




o 


<+-i 








(U 








4-4 






1 


OJ 


0) 




CO 


<! -H 




CU 


o 


x) 




'H 




0) 


o 




•H 


c 








CO 




CO 


CO 


C 


CO 




Ph 


•H 




CU 


a 




u 


4-1 


CU 




Q) CO 




> 


•H 


4-J 


4J 


M 








•H 




•H 


•H 


M 


•H 




4-1 




O 




W 


;>. o 




pq 


C/D 


>-i 




1 Pm 




•H 


}-4 


CO 


o 










Q 




CO 


+J 




a 




>^ 


r> 


•H 






>-l -p 








p 


00 


O 




4-) 


0) 


(U 


>-< 


tH 












O 


•H 


tH 






rC 


c 


M-l 




o 


O -H 




CU 


CU 


u 


c 


-a ^ 




o 


4-1 


u 


cd 


CO 








>^ 




rCl 


c 


CO 


E 


iH 


U 


o 


<4-l 




•H 


4-1 >-l 




^ 


X: 


o 


3 


6 ^4 




3 


V-l 


u 


M-( 


•H 


CO 




CO 


u 




6 


o 


•H 


3 


tH 


C 


iH 


3 


>. -P 


CO CU 




4-> 


4-1 


CO 


kJ 


O CO 




}-i 


< 


< 


c 


T3 


OJ 




QJ 


(U 




o 


4J 


13 


QJ 


3 


< 


O 


CO 


J-< 


O 


U P-> 


CU 






J-l 




U CU 




4_l 






M 


}-i 


CO 




CO 


4-1 




V4 


•H 


M 


C 


,i«S 




CJ) 


c 


CO 


}-i 


•H 


CO 


4-1 


14-1 


f^ 


4-1 


^ ffi 




CO 


TJ 


>% 




CO 


D 




d 


}-i 




rC 


>-i 


CO 


Pm 


CD 


M 




M 


C 


Q) 


Cund 


CO 


O 


O 




O 


H 




rQ 


QJ 


M 


I— 1 


CJ 


CO 




CO 


< 




H 


cu 


o 






CO 


T3 




o 


tH 


CO CU 


CU 






1 




CU 




o 


N 


o 


CO 


O 


C_3 


CO 


CJ 




CO 




P-i 


o 


rH 


TS 


iH 


CU 


>^ 


>-< 


a 


CU N 


CO 


§ 


CO 




CO 


>^ > 






•H 


4-t 


•H 


>^ 




•H 




>^ 


•H 


!>s 




t^ 


CO 


CU 


3 


4-1 


M 


o 


CO 


Pi -H 


•H 


e 


4-1 


g 


U -H 




o 


iH 


CO 


Xl 


S 


tH 


C 


tH 


u 


c 


^ 


0) S 


•H 


S-i 


o 


CO 


CO 


u 


o 


tH 


Q 


o 


o 


c 


o 


CO 4-1 




•H 


Cd 


U 


>-i 




CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 




^ 


:3 


•H 


}-l 


c 




•H 


O CO 




a 


c 


CU 


a 


a CO 


w 


C 


»-i 


•H 


CO 


(U 


U 




u 


C 




C 


p 


QJ 


O 


4-1 


>-t 


O 


O 


(U 


M 


•H M 


4J 


•H 


•H 


-a 


•H 


O CU 


CO 


o 


cu 


a 


a 


4-) 


3 


3 


3 


o 


j3 


O 


M-l 


•M 


C 


O 


4-1 


M-l 


s 


4-1 


CU 


T3 CU 


M 


o 


O 


•H 


a 


e w) 


:=) 


}-l 


c 


CO 


o 


3 


4-) 


(U 


4-1 


u 


(U 


U 


m 


3 


O 


CO 


a 


^ 


tH 


3 


4-1 


V4 a 


CO 


J-l 


>H 


a 


u 


rH a 


<: 


X 


0) 


(U 


>^ 


O 


CO 


c 


CO 


o 


c 


O 


•H 


O 


>-i 


>-i 


(U 


CU 


3 


o 


>-l 


CO (U 


CU 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


3 o 


o 


u 


o 


Pii 


S 


<d 


^ 


p^ 


Z 


o 


P. 


u 


Q 


< 


pq 


flH 


> 


P4 


P. 


< 


< 


U O 


W 


o 


u 


<U 


u 


P^ u 





M 








































H 










0) 








































H 










X 










rH 




























0) 










M 


(U 




•H 






tH 




























tH 


•> 


c 






M 


tH 




c 




Xl 


O 


























^ 


CO 


C 


O 






h- 1 


tH 




CO 




r-l 


U 








4-1 


tH 










3 


(U 


<U 


o 


•T3 


O 


CO 








CU 




•H 




CU 


(U 




>^ 




4-1 


OJ 






C 


>. 


o 


c 


CO CU }-i 


na 


C 


CO 


c 






^ 


!^ 




.H ^ 




•H 


4-1 


c 


^ 




CO 


^ 






CO 


CO 


tH 


o 


x; X o 


C 


(U 


u 


Xi 






CO 






00 o 


4J 


4-1 


4-1 


CO 




u 


CO 


o 


M 


rC 


Ni 


iH 


CO 


00 O 


P- CO 


X 


CU 


O 


>^ 




).4 


• 




CO P!S 


>-( 


4-1 


CU 


iH 


CJ 




p-1 


CO 


N 


•H 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


a o tH 


o u 


CO 


T3 


•-D 


-5 




(U 


w 


XI 


O 


CO 


CO 


PH 


C 


s 


o 




W 


c 


<U 


iH 


s 


PQ 


CO 


•H Pi -H 


rC 


PQ 


C 




rCl 




> 




X 




^ 


W 




o 




•H 






<u 


:s 


tH 






to 


c o 


CO • 




CU 


• 


•H 




to 


(U 


<U 


. d 


QJ 




• 


Q 


. 


CO 


12 


. 


>-l 




CO 




. 




a (u 


•H S 


• 


PC 


CJ 


PQ 


>. 


M 


c 


:2 


< 


4-1 


• 


u 




*-i 


o 




:s 


o 


. 


CJ 


< 


w 


. 


3 a • 


PQ 


rs 








<J 


H 


•H 




CU 


C/D 


<: 




. 




PQ 


'O 




hJ 


<: 








H 


CJ -H PM 


CO 




• 


CO 


• 


3 




P 


iH 


QJ ,H 






(U 


U 


CU 




u 


4J 


•H 




4-J 


na 


4J 




^ 


CO (U 


4J 


o 


<u 


S 


J 


^ 


CU 


CU 


00 iH 


CO 


CU 


c 




•H 


^ 


CO 


U 


o 


t3 


>-l 


iH 


u 


j:: 


iH p. C 


J>^ CJ 


CO 




tH 






C 


x: 


U3 


Vj -h 


•H 


•H 


CU 


(U 


iH 


C 


rC 


QJ 




•H 


0) 


o 


CU 


4-1 


CU CU (U 


T3 C 


d) 


rH 


U 


>~. 


CO 


CO 


4-1 


CO 


O B 


U 


X 


00 




CO 


CO 


O 


X 


CU 


> 


^ 


u 


,0 


•H 


N CO iH 


CO CO 





rH 


CO 


M 


M 


M 


CO 


CO 


(U CO 


O 


X 


3 


qj 


CU 


^1 


•H 


O 


> 


CO 


tH 


CO 


o 


T^ 


CO O CU 


tH }-i 


M 


•H 


rC 


JS 


o 


(i. 


CJ) 


M 


o u 


o 


<3 


w 


< 


>-^ 


P^ 


(Hi 


Pd 


w 


O 


< 


w 


oci 


w 


W Id W 


O f>^ 


W 


PQ 


CJ 


s 


!z; 





tH un 00 










r-J CN LD tH CN CN 










iH •<)■ CO iH C^J 










>. >^ >. 1-- in 


rH CN un 








>"•>.>. t^ >^ 1-1 U V4 tH CO Cr> tH CN 


CO <r iH CN 


as 


00 in r^ 


r^ 


J-it_(>.i(-i^iCOcOcO 


CM CO 00 tH 


r^ CN 


CN CN tH tH 




cOcOcOcOcODPajC^^XrC! 


^iHrHtHCOtHtHtH 






>.vD 


33333l-i>-j>-iaooocJ 


O -H -H 'H CU 


CU (U 


CU >. t^ >s 


rH r^ 


CCiCCCrQXXV-i»-i^j»-^M 


>.(V^^,>.i>,>,>^>,j:: 


a c 


a tH tH tH 


3 0^ 


cOcOcOcOcOCUCUQJcOcOcOcOcO 
'-)'-3'-)'-)'-)P-.P^P^2SSS:^ 


s^^^ssss^ 


3 3 


3 3 3 3 


•^ tH 


•-) "^ 


*-} ^ ^ *-) 



172 



CNiHtHrHiHrvJiHCsjr-ttHiHiH 



O ,H O O 



tHtHlTiiHCOiHCNCOiH 00 



«^m<yiOm<tOrHr^v£)oOLnvDfOr-it^csi ro 
cor^r-»\r>r^cor^LnLnr--vDoooocNii^r^ON cyi 





















(0 






































3 






































00 

CO 






































X 
































C 






a 














































C3 


























•H 






CO 













0) 




















■M 


CO 




w 






•H 






CO 


















<u 


CO 


s 










4-1 






CO 










>-, 








>-i 


J-i 


<U 




M-l 




0) 


CJ 






0) 










CJ 








3 


OJ 


-Td 







c 


CO 


U 






CO 










c 








iH 


C 


W 









CO 


CO 






•H 










0) 








•H 


(U 






CO 


•H 


CU 


M-l 






Q 










•H 








CO 


M 


>^ 


0) 


B 


4-1 


CO 


3 








CO 

















fe 


0) 


u 


}-i 








•H 


M 


4-1 




4-J 


•H 








•H 










Q 


CO 


3 


c 


3 


Q 




CO 




5-1 


CO 








M-l 




CO 




■U 




c 


tH 


•H 


5-1 




I— 1 


0) 




CO 







CO 




LH 




•H 




M 


I— 1 





•H 





4J 


>. 


CO 


u 




0) 


^ 




•H 




3 


CO 


c 




CO 


CO 


g 


CO 


>-i 


CO 


i-l 


•H 


u 




PC 


e 


>. 


pj 




03 


•H 







(U 


U 


l-^ 


1^ 


CO 


rO 


0) 


Td 


< 









5-1 


Q 




C 


CO 


B 




!I! 


^ 


3 










■U 


5-( 






0) 


5-1 


CO 


e 




1— 1 





3 


• 




OJ 


fU 


>^ 






M 


CO 


>% 


CO 


> 


X 


3 


3 






iJ 


0) 


M 


OJ 


u 




5-1 


CJ 


rH 


< 


a 


!-i 


g 


•H 


H 





0) 




>. 


CO 


C 




> 


(U 


iH 





•H 


CO 










CO 




5-1 


3 




u 


s 


a 


• 


•H 





CO 


4-1 


4-) 


C 


p^ 


>> 


4-1 


OJ 


3 


r-H 





CL 












s 


4-1 




U 


CO 


CO 


•H 


5-1 


X 


CO 


T3 


CU 


CO 


CJ 







pj 


c 


X 




CO 


QJ 


Q) 


U 


4-1 


■u 


CO 




U 


CO 


■u 


U 




^ 


w 


Q 


•H 





<u 


0) 


rH 


4-1 


•H 


CO 


CO 


C 


Q) 


•H 


5-1 


5^ 


Xi 


CU 





0:1 


g 





c 


4-1 


M 


•H 


CO 


Cu 


CO 


cu 





4-1 


a 


0) 


0) 


CU 


4-1 


3 


p 


tH 


J-i 





d 


C 


c 


^ 


CO 


4-1 


4-1 


5-1 


3 


CO 


1—1 


Cu 


5-1 


3 





^ 


a 


rt 


u 








CU 


•H 


(U 


<U 


C 














>^ 


OJ 





5-1 


s 


f^ 


u 


M 


< 


CJ 


C/2 


pq 


f^ 


S 


M 


u 


< 


Pi 


ty^ 


X 


CJ 


<; 


pq 









3 


M 


5-1 
1-5 






















5-^ 


5-1 



























OJ 


»> 










3 


4-1 










,£J 


^ 


CO 


>> 






CO 


CO 


5-4 










5-1 


-o 


3 M 


4d 


>. 




4-1 


TJ 


CO 






3 CO 3 




CO 


3 


•H 3 


4-1 


(U 


CO 


CO 


•H 


X 


3 




OJ OJ CO 


CO 


>^ 0) 


•H 


^ -H 


5-1 


tH 


•H 





5-1 


3 


OJ 




CO 3 iH 


3 


(U 


kJ 


3-5-4 5-1 


?>^ CO 


5-1 


3 





0) 


•H 


13 




CO JS 3 


•H 


3 




5-4 CU 3- 


5^ 








CU 


^ 


CU 


U 




•H W 


S 


• 


• 


CO pL, V2 


^ Si 


S 


^ 


n 


CO 


Pi 







2: Q 


CU 


X < 


P^ 


X 


CO S 




iH 








:s 






N 


Su 




c/: • . 


M 


• 


t^ 


. 


. 


, 






. ci . 




<U 


IS ►-o 




PJH 


N 


PC 


flH 


!i^ 


, 




C/3 CJ 


• 


<U 


5-1 


CO 


. H 




C/3 








w 




a 


a 


• u 





■H 0) (U 


1^ 


T3 




TJ 


CO 


CO 






J-i -H QJ 




W CO 


■Td 


^ bO-ri 


CO 


5-^ 


3 


5-1 


CO 


•H 


0) 


W 


CO iH CJ 


CO 


60 




.H 5-1 3 


15^ -H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


E 


iH 


3 


5 


-H to 


■p 


>^ 5-1 


<u 


>. 3 


5-1 iH 


IS 


CO 


^ 







(U 


^ 


CO ^ !-i 
{1. 


•H 
Pi 


II 


H 


£5S 


1^ 




^ 


-3 




^ 


5-1 
M 




CNI 


ON 

























yo r-l 


iH 


m 






in r^ 








r-- 


00 


<r 










CO 


r^ r-) in 


r-i 1-1 


I— 1 


CM 


r^ 


CN 


CN 


CM 




CN 5-1 M 


5-1 


5-1 ^ 


CN 


CN m 


















eg <u (U 


CU 


OJ 




S-i 


S-i 5-1 


S-( 


U 


5-1 


l-i 


5-4 


5^ 




-9 '° 


r£3 


x u 


5-1 


5-1 5-1 CU 


CU 0) 


(U 


(U 


(U 


a; 


(U 


CU 




jj e e 


B 


B <u 


CU 


(U CU ,Q 


^ ^ 


X 


^ 


^ 


X 


,^ 


rO 




CO (U CU 


OJ 


0) ,Q 


X 


a 


e e 


B 


e 


e 


B 


B 


B 


w 


3 4-J 4-1 


4-1 


•P 





CU <u 


0) 


(U 


CU 


(U 


(U 


0) 


H 


W) a 3- 


a- 


a 4J 


4-1 


4-1 4-1 > 


> > 


a 








CJ 








< 


3 0) (U 


(U 


(U 


CJ 


000 





(U 


0) 


CU 


<u 


(U 


<u 


Q 


<; C/2 C/2 


CO 


C/3 





002 


IS s 


Q 


p 








P 


p 



173 



TOWN WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet 
in the Memorial School Auditorium at six o'clock a.m., for the following 
purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates 
of Political Parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE (one man and one woman) 

for each Political Party for the Middlesex and Norfolk Senatorial 

District. 

35 Members of the Democratic Town Committee 

35 Members of the Republican Town Committee 

10 Members of the American Town Committee 

The polls will be open from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 3rd day of February, A.D. , 1976 

HoAALf A. K^IZ^koA 
R. EduooAd BzoAd 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Selectmen of Medfield 

February 16, 1976 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said Warrant in not less 
than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven (7) days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 

{iJUJUam H. I.iann 
Constable 



174 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
MARCH 2, 1976 



Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, the meeting was held at the Memorial 
School on Tuesday, the second day of March, 1976, at 6:00 P.M. The Warrant 
was read, the ballots delivered to the clerks and the polls declared open. 
The ballot boxes had previously been examined and found to be in good working 
order. The specimen ballots and cards of instruction were posted as pre- 
scribed by law. The following election officers were sworn in and assigned 
to their duties: 



Warden: Florence Roberts 

Clerks: Precinct 1 

Precinct 2 

Precinct 3 

Precinct 4 

Ballot Clerks: Muriel Harris 



Mary MairEtienne 

Richard DeSorgher 

Clara DeNucci 

Anna Murphy 
Martha Welch, Beatrice Bangs, Mae Maguire, 
John Ganley, Elizabeth Ipolitti, Elmer 0. Portman, Jr. , 
Margaret Bernick, Phyllis Ripley, Marion Bosselman, and 
Eva Grover 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 1800. 1022 Democrats 778 Republicans 

After the final tabulation was made, the results were announced as follows: 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOT 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 


PRECINCT 1 


PRECINCT 2 


PRECINCT 3 


PRECINCT 


4 
Tot. 


Robert L. Kelleher 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


George C. Wallace 


30 


40 


29 


15 


114 


Ellen McCormack 


30 


41 


23 


21 


115 


Terry Sanford 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Lloyd Bentsen 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Fred R. Harris 


17 


15 


18 


6 


56 


Milton J. Shapp 


12 


7 


17 


15 


48 


Birch Bayh 


9 


10 


23 


15 


57 


Jimmy Carter 


22 


39 


43 


38 


142 


R. Sargent Shriver 


6 


18 


13 


15 


52 


Henry M. Jackson 


55 


52 


41 


40 


188 


Morris K. Udall 


38 


46 


74 


55 


213 


No Preference 


1 


4 


4 


4 


13 


Blanks 


- 


3 


_ 


1 


4 


Humphrey 


3 


5 


1 


1 


10 


Scattered 


- 


6 


2 


2 


10 



STATE COMMITTEE 2nd Middlesex and Norfolk - man 



Arthur M. Tiernan, 


, Jr. 134 180 


192 


139 


645 


Blanks 


89 106 


96 


86 


377 


STATE COMMITTEE 


2nd Middlesex and Norfolk - woman 








Mary M. Sullivan 


135 183 


192 


139 


649 


Blanks 


88 103 


96 


86 


373 



175 



TOWN COMMITTEE 





PRECINCT 1 


PRECINCT 2 


PRECINCT 3 


PRECINCT 


4 
Tot 


Mary Harney 


111 


142 


153 


116 


522 


John A. Rose, Jr. 


104 


125 


133 


96 


458 


L. Lee DeSorgher 


122 


169 


150 


128 


569 


Michael W. Tammaro 


112 


151 


145 


108 


516 


John L. DeMartino, Jr. 


113 


151 


145 


112 


521 


Kathleen Sheahan 


100 


132 


151 


101 


484 


Lucille M. Cynewski 


109 


132 


140 


99 


480 


Leo F. Kelly 


114 


156 


155 


114 


539 


John T. Harney 


110 


138 


151 


112 


511 


James G. Boy Ian 


99 


125 


136 


105 


465 


Richard DeSorgher 


119 


168 


147 


121 


555 


Ra>'Tnond Cynewski 


106 


135 


140 


98 


479 


Dorothy A. Petrocca 


101 


141 


138 


105 


485 


Anthony T. Petrocca 


100 


141 


137 


105 


483 


Steven Rudnick 


94 


131 


144 


104 


473 


Peter Hinkley 


3 


- 


4 


- 


7 


Richard Hinkley 


3 


- 


4 


- 


7 


George Hinkley 


4 


- 


4 


- 


8 


Edna Hinkley 


3 


- 


4 


- 


7 


Laurene Hinkley 


3 


- 


4 


- 


7 


Judith Hinkley 


3 


- 


4 


- 


7 


Margaret Vasaturo 


2 


2 


1 


- 


5 


Elizabeth Ippoliti 


2 


5 


4 


2 


13 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 
PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



Ronald W. Reagan 
Gerald R. Ford 
No Preference 
Scattered 



40 


49 


89 


62 


240 


94 


127 


144 


136 


501 


5 


3 


5 


3 


16 


1 


2 


3 


7 


13 



STATE COMMITTEE 2nd Middlesex and Norfolk - man 



Frank H. Conway 62 






74 


117 


126 


379 


Robert J. Gilkie 43 






54 


63 


44 


204 


Blanks 36 






56 


63 


39 


194 


No Preference 






1 


— 


- 


1 


STATE COMMITTEE 2nd Middlesex and 


Norfc 


)lk 


- woman 








Judith H. Ide 68 






80 


104 


96 


348 


Sherry Jenkins Martin 31 






48 


76 


76 


231 


Blanks 42 






56 


63 


37 


198 


No Preference 






1 


- 


- 


1 



176 



TOWN COMMITTEE 



William P. Mikelonis 
Jeanne M. Mikelonis 
Dwight E. Adams 
E. Augusta Clark 
Lawrence D. Clark, Sr, 
Weston G. Kolsti 
Mabelle E. Maguire 
Jane E. Minesinger 
Roberta Kolsti 
Richard F. Kaerwer 
Nancy J. Preston 
Robert L. Coulter 
Pauline A. Coulter 
Thomas J. Shire 
Donald H. Harding 
Robert W. Miller 
Ann S. Miller 
Alice Jean Dries 
Robert H. Luke, Jr. 
Stephanie C. Peck 
Charles H. Peck 
Elmer 0. Portmann, Jr. 
Warren E. Sheard 
William F. Nourse 
Carlene M. Nourse 
Joel Adams 



86 


117 


153 


140 


496 


86 


119 


151 


138 


494 


96 


123 


160 


161 


540 


88 


123 


155 


151 


512 


87 


111 


152 


145 


495 


89 


122 


172 


147 


530 


92 


122 


157 


159 


530 


90 


114 


167 


149 


520 


91 


118 


168 


148 


525 


91 


115 


162 


151 


519 


102 


136 


177 


164 


579 


101 


142 


170 


160 


573 


100 


143 


171 


159 


573 


84 


105 


153 


135 


477 


87 


107 


155 


148 


497 


85 


106 


153 


135 


479 


84 


107 


152 


137 


480 


84 


102 


150 


136 


472 


99 


121 


171 


157 


548 


92 


122 


158 


143 


515 


90 


121 


159 


143 


513 


84 


113 


166 


151 


514 


87 


116 


168 


150 


521 


103 


126 


173 


149 


551 


94 


119 


157 


145 


515 


3 


- 


6 


- 


9 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: Mary Mair- 
Etienne, Richard DeSorgher, Muriel Harris, Anna Murphy, Beatrice Bangs, Eva 
Grover, Margaret Bernick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Phyllis Ripley, Marion Bosselman. 
Dwight Adams, Jane E. Minesinger, Jeanne Sander, Jeanne Mikelonis, Beverly 
Smith, Lynn Randolph, Sandra Fitch, Sarah Reagan, Stephen Rudnick, John 
DeMartino, Patricia Bursey, Mary Lovell, and Janet 0' Toole. 

After the results were publicly announced, the Ballots, tally sheets and 
master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as pre- 
scribed by law. 

A true copy attest: 

hJancy J, Vn.^tj:}vi 
Town Clerk 



177 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town 
affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
twenty-ninth day of March, A.D. 1976, at 6:00 a.m., then and there to act on 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one member of the School Committee for one year. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, and one member of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Town Clerk, two Park 
Commissioners, all for three years. 

One member of the Housing Authority for four years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority 
both for five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLES 2 THROUGH 36 WILL APPEAR WITH THE REPORT OF THE ADJOURNED TOWN 
MEETING APRIL 28, 1976 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, at least seven days 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 17th day of February, A.D. 1976. 

HoAAij A. Kditdh^A 

AAXkuA L. ToAAjOA 

R. EdwoAd Boxind 
Selectmen of Medfield 



178 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 



March 19, 1976 
Medfield, Massachusetts 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 
five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time 
of holding the meeting. 

{UitUjim H. Hann 
Constable of Medfield 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION, MARCH 29, 1976 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the meeting was opened at 6:00 A.M. by 
the reading of the warrant through Article 1. The ballot boxes were checked 
and found to be in working order, voting lists displayed and instructions to 
voters and specimen ballots posted as required by law. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts: 



Warden: 


Elmer 0. 


Portmann, Jr. 








Clerks: 


Precinct 


1 


Mary 


MairEt: 


Lenne 








Precinct 


2 


Eva Grover 










Precinct 


3 


Phyllis Ripley 








Precinct 


4 


Anna 


Murphy 








Checkers: 


Precinct 


1 


Florence Roberts 








Precinct 


2 


Margaret Bernick 








Precinct 


3 


Marion Boss( 


Blman 








Precinct 


4 


Beatrice Bangs 














Precincts 




Tota: 


MODERATOR - one 


year 




1 


2 


3 


4 




Ralph C. Copeland 




387 


526 


551 


503 


1967 


Blanks 






101 


98 


82 


100 


381 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


; - one year 












I. Jerome O'Connor 




224 


339 


261 


254 


1078 


Darrel R. Bates 






230 


252 


349 


309 


1140 


Blanks 






34 


32 


23 


40 


129 


Scattered 









1 








1 



TOWN CLERK - three years 



Nancy J. Preston 


403 


546 


552 


516 


2017 


Blanks 


85 


78 


79 


87 


329 


Scattered 








2 





2 



179 



SELECTMEN - three years 

Norman A. Gray, Jr. 
William R. Reagan 
Paul E. Hinkley 
William D. Walsh 
Blanks 





Precincts 




1 


2 


3 


4 


58 


75 


78 


100 


162 


259 


358 


273 


192 


173 


109 


140 


70 


69 


104 


82 


6 


13 


19 


8 



Total 



311 

1052 

614 

325 

46 



ASSESSOR - three years 



Joseph ?. Kennedy 


391 


509 


531 


500 


Blanks 


97 


115 


102 


103 


TRUSTEE OF PUBLIC LIBRARY ■ 


. 








three years 










Thomas E. Anastasi, Jr. 


294 


386 


456 


368 


Jane M. Guthrie 


352 


478 


480 


464 


Blanks 


330 


384 


330 


374 



1941 
417 



1504 
1774 
1418 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - three years 



Dawn I. Austin 


186 


236 


300 


277 


999 


Robert G. Stokes 


175 


220 


196 


222 


813 


Marvin W. Kushner 


95 


146 


119 


76 


436 


Blanks 


32 


22 


18 


28 


100 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 
TWO MEMBERS - 3 years 



Norman P. Fitch 


162 


171 


223 


136 


692 


William J. Heller 


216 


338 


334 


310 


1198 


Richard DeSorgher 


326 


456 


439 


459 


1680 


Blanks 


272 


276 


270 


301 


1119 



HOUSING AUTHORITY - 4 years 



Dorothy D. 


Anastasi 


372 


503 


531 


469 


1875 


Blanks 




116 


121 


92 


134 


473 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



5 years 



Lawrence M. O'Dell 


351 


495 


509 


469 


1824 


Blanks 


137 


129 


124 


134 


524 



PLANNING BOARD 



5 years 



Robert J. 


Larkin 


363 


503 


508 


460 


1834 


Blanks 




125 


121 


125 


143 


514 



180 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: 

Mary MairEtienne, Muriel Harris, Anna Murphy, Beatrice Bangs, Eva Grover, 
Margaret BernicV , Phyllis Wilmarth, Phyllis Ripley, Marion Bosselman, Dwight 
Adams, Jane Minesinger, Jeanne Sander, Jeanne Mikelonis, Beverly Smith, Lynn 
Randolph, Sarah Reagan, Stephen Rudnick, John DeMartino, Janet 0' Toole, 
Florence Roberts, Mabelle Maguire, Jonathan E. Early, Elizabeth Ipolitti, 
Clara DeNucci. 

After the results were publicly announced, the Ballots, Tally Sheets and 
Master Sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as pre- 
scribed by law. 

Nancij J. V^QMtOYi 
Town Clerk 

A true copy attest. 



On April 10, 1976 a recount was held for the one year School Committee posi- 
tion which resulted in the following result: 



I. Jerome O'Connor 


225 


341 


261 


258 


1085 


Barrel R. Bates 


229 


250 


348 


304 


1131 


Blanks 


34 


32 


24 


41 


131 


Scattered 





1 








1 



The official record was corrected to show these results. 



A true copy attest: 



HcLYidij J. V^^ton 
Town Clerk 



181 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS, APRIL 26, 1976 



The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 P.M. after ascer- J 
taining that a quorum was present. Those present were invited to join the | 
Salute to the Flag. Richard DeSorgher then read the Proclamation which was 
read originally in 1776 at the opening of all sessions of the superior and 
inferior courts, and at all town meetings in March. 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded 
in their regular sequence regardless of the order 

on which they were voted. m 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several 
Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to receive the reports of the several Town Officers 
for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer Board, Commission and Commmittee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1976, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums 
of money to defray the departmental and other expenses 
of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1976, 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108. 



AlOO-OO Selectmen 




AlOO-Ol Administration 




100 Personnel 


1,975 


200 Operations 


1,700 


300 Supplies 


2,685 


500 Equipment 


500 



6»860 



AlOO-03 Executive Secretary 

100 Personnel 113,997 

200 Operations 400 

300 Supplies 150 



AlOO-04 Data Processing 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 9,383 

500 Equipment 350 



114,547 



9,733 
Total AlOO-Ol, 03, 04 $131,140 



AlOl-OO Town Counsel 

100 Personnel 6,200 

200 Operations 2,500 

300 Supplies 90 



182 



8,790 



A102-00 Treasurer 

100 Personnel 5,000 

200 Operations 3,130 

300 Supplies 



A103-00 Tax Collector 

100 Personnel 5,000 

200 Operations 710 

300 Supplies 2,345 

500 Equipment 0_ 



AlOO-04 Town Clerk 

100 Personnel 5,000 

200 Operations 655 

300 Supplies 77 

600 Employee Education 



A105-00 Assessors 



100 Personnel 


1,750 


200 Operations 


12,725 


300 Supplies 


910 


400 Other Charges 


150 


500 Equipment 


155 


A106-00 Planning Board 




200 Operations 


5,600 


300 Supplies 


40 


500 Equipment 






A107-00 Park & Recreation 

A107-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 1,138 

200 Operations 4,287 

300 Supplies 260 

500 Equipment 3,500 



A107-02 Park & Recreation 
(Combined 02, 03, 05) 

100 Personnel 18,165 

200 Operations 4,797 

300 Supplies 1,985 

400 New Programs 1,500 

500 Equipment 



A107-03 Park & Recreation 
Formerly A107-04 Parks 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 2,332 

300 Supplies 100 

500 Capital Expenses 0__ 

Total A107-01, 02, 03 $38,064 



183 



8,130 



8,055 



5,732 



15,670 



5,640 



9,185 



26,447 



2,432 



A108-00 Election & Registration 
100 Personnel 7,323 
200 Operations 3,415 
300 Supplies 8 
500 Equipment 



A109-00 Town Hall 

100 Personnel 8,891 

200 Operations 15,998 

500 Equipment 8,200 



10,746 



100 


Personnel 


143,734 


200 


Operations 
•05 Sidewalks 


63,980 


.110- 




200 


Operations 


4,000 


.110- 


•06 Snow & Ice 




100 


Personnel 


20,000 


200 


Operations 


40,000 



AllO-07 Town Garage 
200 Operations 7,260 



Total AllO-04, 05, 06, 07 $278,974 

Alll-00 Police 
Alll-01 Administration 
100 Personnel 50,595 



Alll-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



Alll-03 Cruiser 
200 Operations 11,800 

500 Equipment 8,000 



Alll-04 Communications 
200 Operations 6,600 



Alll-05 Traffic Markings & 
Signs 
200 Operations 3,680 



33,089 



207,714 



4,000 



60,000 



7,260 



195, 


,303 


6, 


,830 


1. 


,160 



50,595 



203,293 



19,800 



6,600 



3,680 



184 



Alll-06 School Traffic 



100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


-01, 02, 

aent 
Lon 


12,502 
300 




Total Alll- 

A112-00 Fire Departs 
A112-01 Administrate 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


03, 04, 05, 06 

15,367 
950 


12,802 
$296,770 


A112-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 


35,247 

12,120 

4,070 


16,317 



Total A112-01, 02 $67,754 

A114-00 Tree & Moth 
A114-01 Mosquito Control 
200 Operations 2,100 



A114-02 Tree Care 

100 Personnel 7,800 

200 Operations 1,800 

300 Supplies 50 



A114-03 Insect & Pest Control 
100 Personnel 1,000 

200 Operations 1,500 



A114-04 Dutch Elm 
100 Personnel 1,500 

200 Operations 825 



Total A114-01, 02, 03, 04 $16,575 

A115-00 Building Inspector 
100 Personnel 8,000 

200 Operations 650 

300 Supplies 600 

500 Equipment 



A116-00 Plumbing Inspector 
100 Personnel 1,850 

200 Operations 258 



51,437 * 



2,100 



9,650 



2,500 



2,325 



9,250 



2,108 



185 



A117-00 Gas Inspector 
100 Personnel 900 

200 Operations 200 



A118-00 Wiring Inspector 



100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


2,891 
400 


A119-00 Sealer Wts. & 
Measures 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


239 
130 


A120-00 Dog Officer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 


9,487 

800 





A121-00 Civil Defense 

200 Operations 660 

300 Supplies 100 

500 Equipment 600 



A122-00 Board of Appeals 



100 Personnel 


750 


200 Operations 


700 


300 Supplies 


40 


A123-00 Street Lights 




200 Operations 


30,800 


A125-00 Board of Health 




100 Personnel 


610 


200 Operations 


6,790 


300 Supplies 


515 



A125-00 Outreach 
200 Operations 9,000 



A126-00 Public Health Nurse 
200 Operations 2,575 



A127-00 Garbage Disposal 
200 Operations 19,000 



A128-00 Mental Health 6,400 



186 



1,100 



3,291 



369 



10,287 



1,360 



1,490 



30,800 



7,915 



9,000* 



2,575 



19,000 



6,400 



A129-00 Ambulance 

100 Personnel 5,600 

200 Operations 1,350 

300 Supplies 75 

500 Equipment 200 



A130-00 5anitary Landfill 

100 Personnel 12,828 

200 Operations 19,682 

500 Equipment 1,600 



A131-00 Sewer Operations 
100 Personnel 35,189 

200 Operations 55,114 

300 Supplies 0_ 



A132-01 Veterans Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Benefits 



A132-02 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 400 



A133-00 Memorial Day 
200 Operations 500 



A134-00 Council on Aging 
200 Operations 3,200 
500 Equipment 



A135-00 Library 



1 


,590 




650 




249 


11 


,000 



100 


Personnel 




24,514 


200 


Operations 




15,246 


300 


Supplies 




1,193 


400 


Credits 




(11,582) 


500 


Equipment 
•00 Water Department 


800 


A140- 




100 


Personnel 




49,409 


200 


Operations 




50,715 


300 


Supplies 







400 


New Services 




7,290 


500 


Repairs Well 
•00 Cemetery < 


#1 
Commission 


3,155 


A145- 




100 


Personnel 




12,450 


200 


Operations 




2,750 


500 


Equipment 




500 



7,225 * 



34,110 * 



90,303 



13,489 



400 



500 



3,200 



30,171 



110,569 



15,700 



187 



A146-00 Conservation Commission 
200 Operations 1,220 
300 Supplies 50 
400 Other Charges 0^ 



A1A7-00 Dev. & Ind. Commission 
200 Operations 75 



A148-00 Historical Commission 
200 Operations 412 



A150-00 Town Debt 
A150-01 Principal 
400 Other Charges 451,000 



A150-02 Interest 
400 Other Charges 255,000 



A155-00 Insurance 

A155-01 Vehicles 8,750 



A155-02 Workmen's Comp. 
200 Operations 23,000 



A155-03 Property & Liability 
200 Operations 17,960 



A155-04 Group 
200 Operations 



Total A155-01, 02, 03, 04 $146,951 



A160-00 Town Report 
200 Operations 



A161-00 County Retirement 
200 Other Charges 82.090 



A162-00 Stabilization Fund 
400 Other Charges 



1,270 



75 



412 



451,000 



255,000 



8,750 



23,000 



17,960 



97,241 



5,000 



82,090 



A163-00 Reserve Fund 
400 Other Charges 50,000 



50,000 



A170-00 Town Meetings 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



A171-00 Warrant Committee 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



420 
1,550 



44 
37 



1,970 



81 



A175-00 Personnel Board 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



450 
395 



845 



A180-00 Regional Vocational Tech. 
High School 
200 Operations 94,004 



1000-00 School Administration 
100 Personnel 112,234 

200 Operations 17,348 



2000-00 Instruction 



4000-00 Plant Oper. & Maint. 
100 Personnel 236,041 

200 Operations 337,819 



94,004* 



129,582 



100 Personnel 


2,920,537 




200 Operations 


177,996 




300 Supplies & Material 


1,090 


3,099,623 


3000-00 Other School Services 






100 Personnel 


72,499 




200 Operations 


24,024 




300 Supplies 


176,997 





273,520 



573,860 



7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 
300 Supplies & Materials 



9000-00 Programs with Other Systems 
400 Other Charges & Credits 107,270 



Total for 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 7000, 9000 

Not voted by line item, only total budget. 

8000-01 Vocational Education 
400 Other Intergovernmental 8,709 



47,383 



107,270 
$4,234,238* 



8,709 



189 



8000-02 Adult Education 
100 Personnel 1,600 

1,600 

8000-03 School Planning & Building 
Committee 
100 Personnel 70 

300 Supplies 30 

100 

TOTAL ARTICLE 3 $6,669,086 

Article 3 items not questioned were passed on April 26, 1976. The starred 
items through line item A125-00 were passed on April 26, 1976. Those re- 
maining were passed on April 27, 1976. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:00 P.M. to take up the Special Town Meeting 
called for at that time. It was reconvened at 9:08 P.M. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 P.M. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 27, 1976 

The meeting was called to order at 7:40 P.M. and the remaining questioned 
Article 3 line items were taken up. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976 in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976 in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Collector to use all means in the 
collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if he was elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Select- 
men, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of Public Library, Collector of 
Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 



190 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Adopted by the Town, November 30, 1964 
(As amended through June 30, 19 76) 

I. TITLE 

The Classification of Positions and the Pay Schedule appended hereto, and 
the provisions of the By-law shall be entitled Personnel Administration Plan 
(hereinafter referred to as The Plan), for the Town of Medfield. 

II. APPLICATION 

The Plan shall apply to all officers and employees in the service of the 
Town (whether full-time, or part-time, seasonal, casual, special. Civil Ser- 
vice or other) other than those positions filled by popular election and 
those under the direction and control of the School Committee. Nothing here- 
in, however, shall bar using The Plan or its provisions or facilities or com- 
mittees in determining the compensation of such otherwise exempted employees 
or officials. 

III. TITLE OF POSITIONS 

No person shall be employed or paid as an employee in any position sub- 
ject to the provisions of The Plan under any title other than those in the 
Schedules or under any title other than that of the job, the duties of which 
are actually performed. The job title in The Plan shall be the official 
title of the position and shall be used in all administrative and employment 
records, and in every other connection involving personnel or fiscal 
processes . 



(Board of Selectmen) 
VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the following elected 
officials in the following amounts: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 5,000 

Treasurer 5,000 

Selectman, Chairman 675 

Selectman, Clerk 650 

Selectman, Third Member 650 

Assessor, Chairman 600 

Assessor, Clerk 575 

Assessor, Third Member 575 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Tax Collector 5,000 

Planning Board 

Park & Recreation Commission 

Housing Authority 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, effective July 1, 1976, to read as follows: 



191 



IV. PERSONNEL BOARD 

Under The Plan, there shall be a Personnel Board consisting of three mem- 
bers who shall be appointed by the Moderator acting in conjunction with the 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen and the Chairman of the Warrant Committee. 
The term of office of members of the Personnel Board shall be three years; 
initial appointments to the Personnel Board were for the periods of one year, 
two years and three years respectively. No elected or appointed officer of 
the Town of Medfield and no person employed by the Town of Medfield shall be 
eligible for service upon the Personnel Board. 

The Personnel Board shall serve without pay. 



V. DUTIES OF THE PERSONNEL BOARD 

A. The Personnel Board shall administer The Plan and establish such poli- 
cies, procedures and regulations consistent with The Plan as it deems 
necessary. 

B. The Personnel Board shall maintain written descriptions of the job 
titles in The Plan describing the essential characteristics, requirements and 
the general duties. The descriptions shall not be interpreted as complete or 
limiting definitions and employees shall continue to perform any duties 
assigned by their superiors. 

C. The Town Accountant and Department Heads shall keep such records of 
the employees of the Town as the Personnel Board may require. The Personnel 
Board shall keep such records of its own as it considers appropriate. All 
records of the Town which pertain to the Town's employees, by whomever kept, 
shall be open to inspection by the Personnel Board or any of its members at 
all reasonable times. 

D. The Personnel Board, from time to time, shall review the work of all 
positions subject to The Plan. Such reviews shall be so scheduled as to 
cover all such positions at intervals of not more than three years. In case 
of urgent necessity, the Personnel Board may tentatively add a new position 
to The Plan or reclassify an existing position, subject to the subsequent 
ratification of its action by a formal amendment of The Plan at the next town 
meeting. No such action may be taken in connection with positions subject to 
Civil Service Laws. 

E. The Personnel Board shall from time to time review the Pay Schedules. 
It shall keep informed as to pay rates and policies outside the services of 
the Town and shall recommend to the Town any action deemed desirable to main- 
tain a fair and equitable pay level. 

F. Upon recommendation of a Department Head, supported by evidence in 
writing of special reasons and exceptional circumstances satisfactory to the 
Personnel Board, said Board may authorize an entrance rate higher than the 
minimum rate for a position, and such other variances in The Plan as it may 
deem necessary for the proper functioning of the services of the Town. 



VI. TYPES OF EMPLOYMENT 

All positions subject to the provisions of The Plan shall fall into one 
of the following categories: 

192 



A. Regular Full-Time : Regularly scheduled to work a full schedule of 40 
hours per week, 52 weeks a year. 

B. Regular Part-Time : Regularly schedule to work no less than 20 hours 
per week, 52 weeks a year. 

C. Casual Part-Time ; Occasional employment for an hourly rate or fee. 

D. Temporary ; Employed for a specific short period of time not to exceed 
6 months. Temporary employment beyond 6 months must be authorized in 
advance by the Department Head and the Personnel Board. 

These categories will determine an employee's eligibility for fringe 
benefits. 



VII. STEP INCREASES - MERIT 

Progression through the rate ranges normally will be one step annually on 
employee's anniversary date provided this is recommended by the Department 
Head and the Personnel Board. 

A. General Increase : When rate ranges are affected by a wage increase 
voted by the Town, either fixed percentage or fixed amount, all em- 
ployees covered by The Plan, except those specifically excluded or 
those holding personal rates, shall receive the increase and the rate 
ranges will be adjusted accordingly. Those holding personal rates 
shall not receive increases until the maximum for the classification 
exceeds the personal rate. 



VIII. PROMOTION AND TRANSFERS 

When an employee is promoted to a higher rated job, he shall enter at the 
minimum of the job's range or at his own rate, whichever is the higher. He 
may also receive a step increase at the time, if the Department Head feels 
that qualifications and performance warrant it, and the Personnel Board 
authorizes it. 

If an employee should be transferred and reclassified to a lower rated 
job, he shall enter it at his own rate or at the maximum of the job, which- 
ever is lower. 

No rate of pay shall be reduced as a result of the rate range revision in 
The Plan. When an employee receives a pay rate above the maximum for the job, 
this rate becomes a personal rate and applies only to the present incumbent. 
When his employment ends, no successor shall advance beyond the maximum for 
the job. 



IX. N EW PERSONNEL 

The hiring rate shall be the minimum of the rate range for the job unless 
otherwise authorized by the Department Head and Personnel Board. If such 
authorization is given, it shall be supported by the Department Head's 
written statement of reasons. 



193 



X. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

A pre-employment physical examination will be required of all regular 
full-time and regular part-time new personnel by a qualified physician of 
the employee's choice. The report is to be made on a form to be provided by 
the Town of Medfield and examination will be at the expense of the Town. 



XI. VACATIONS 

The following annual vacations with pay will be granted to all regular 
full-time employees and to regular part-time employees who are on an hourly 
paid basis, after the following periods of continuous employment. 

Time Employed Length of Vacations 

As of June 1st Each Year 

6 months up to one year 5 days 

1 year, but less than five years 10 days 

5 years, but less than ten years 15 days 

10 years and over 20 days 

The weekly vacation pay of regular part-time employees shall be the 
average of weekly pay for the last twenty-six (26) weeks worked immediately 
preceding the vacation. 

Vacations with pay shall not be granted to temporary or casual part-time 
employees . 

Should a holiday fall during an employee's regularly scheduled work day 
while the employee is on an authorized vacation, an additional day of vacation 
will be allowed. 

Vacations shall not be cumulative from year to year. 

Employees terminating their employment with the Town will receive payment 
in lieu of any earned vacation not yet taken in the calendar year of their 
employment termination. 

XII. HOLIDAYS 

Regular full-time employees and regular part-time employees shall be 
paid for each of the following holidays, except that regular part-time 
employees shall be paid only for those holidays falling on a regularly 
scheduled work day and on the same basis as their earnings, if they had 
worked : 

New Year's Day Memorial Day Veterans' Day 

Martin Luther King Day Independence Day Thanksgiving Day 

Washington's Birthday Labor Day Christmas Day 

Patriot's Day Columbus Day 

Regular full-time employees of the various Town Departments, other than 
Department Heads, required to work on any of the above specified holidays 
shall be paid on the basis of straight time in addition to the regular holiday 
pay for that day, or, at the discretion of the Department Head, may be given 
equivalent time off at regular pay. 



194 



Police Department employees will be paid at straight time for time worked 
on a holiday in addition to holiday pay. Police Department employees working 
on a scheduled day off which is a holiday may be given equivalent time off at 
straight time. 

Holidays with pay shall not be granted to temporary or casual part-time 
employees . 

XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

Except for reasons to the extent hereinafter provided, all leaves of 
absence shall be without compensation. 

A. Sick Leave : 

1. Upon completion of 30 days' regular full-time employment, an 
employee shall be allowed one and one quarter days' sick leave with pay 
for each month of employment completed in any given calendar year provided 
such leave is caused by sickness or injury or by exposure to contagious 
disease, but not injury sustained in other employment. 

2. An employee in continuous employment shall be credited with the 
unused portion of sick leave granted under subsection (1) up to a maximum 
of ninety (90) days. 

3. If the amount of sick leave credit provided for under subsection 
(2) has been, or is about to be exhausted, an employee may make application 
for additional allowance to that provided under subsection (1). Such appli- 
cation shall be made to the Personnel Board which is authorized to grant 
such additional allowance as it may determine to be equitable after review- 
ing all circumstances including the employee's attendance and performance 
record prior to conditions supporting his request for additional allowance. 

4. Sick leave must be authorized by the Department Head and must be 
reported, on blank provided for same, to the Personnel Board. 

5. A physician's certificate of illness may be requested by the 
Department Head after three days' absence or after a series of repeated 
absences during the year. This certificate shall be forwarded by the 
Department Head to the Personnel Board. 

6. The Personnel Board may require a medical examination of any 
employee who reports his inability to report for duty because of illness. 
This examination would be at the expense of the Town by a physician ap- 
pointed by the Personnel Board. 

7. Injury, illness or disability self-imposed, or resulting from the 
use of alcohol or drugs shall not be considered a proper claim for sick 
leave under this Section. 

8. An employee who is incapacitated by reason of an injury sustained 
in the course of and arising out of his employment by the Town may elect 
to receive from his accumulated sick leave the difference between his 

formal work week compensation and the weekly indemnity of the Workman's 
Compensation Act, beginning with the first day of incapacity. 



195 



9. Notification of absence due to illness must be made as early as 
possible on the first day of absence, either to the employee's immediate 
superior or to the Department Head. 

10. Nothing in this Section shall be construed to conflict with 
Section 100, Chapter 41 of the General Laws, and in the event of such con- 
flict the provisions of said Section 100 of Chapter 41 shall prevail as to 
employees covered by said Section 100 of Chapter 41. 

B. Jury Duty : 

A regular full-time employee called for jury duty shall be paid by the 
Town an amount equal to the difference between the compensation paid for a 
normal working period and the amount paid by the Court excluding allowance 
for travel. 

C. Military Training : 

Regular full-time employees with more than one year continuous employ- 
ment by the Town next prior to the time of performing the service herein 
referred to, who are required to report for temporary summer or like period 
of training in the military forces of the Nation or the Commonwealth shall 
be paid an amount equal to the difference between compensation for normal 
working period of two weeks and the amount paid for military training. An 
employee, on request, may combine his military leave with his regular vaca- 
tion period. 

D. Funeral Leave : 

Regular full-time employees shall be given up to three days' leave with 
pay for the purpose of making arrangements and attending the funeral of mem- 
bers of their immediate family which is defined as the following: mother, 
father, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sister, brother, spouse, child and 
grandparents of the employee. 



XIV. OVERTIME 

Overtime will be worked only with authorization of the Department Head. 
Regular full-time employees, exclusive of Department Heads, who are required 
by the Department Head to work overtime, will be paid time and one half for all 
hours worked in excess of forty hours (40) per week within the department 
where the employee is regularly employed. Where overtime is performed for a 
department other than the employee's regular full-time department, the overtime 
rate will be time and one half the appropriate rate schedule for the work being 
performed as determined by the Department Head for whom the work is being 
accomplished. 



XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS 

A. Call Back : 

When an hourly paid employee is called in to wprk on an emergency 
assignment, pay shall be no less than two (2) hours' pay at the appropriate 
straight-time, hourly rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 



196 



B. Snow Removal : 

Time and one half for the time worked other than the normal schedule. 
Double time for time worked on Sundays and Holidays. 

C. Fire Pay : 

1. All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 
of two (2) hours' fire pay. 

2. Town employees responding as call firemen will receive one (1) 
hour at their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 

3. Should the fire continue beyond the one (1) hour, normal fire pay 
will apply for the duration of the fire. 

4. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 a.m. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. This means that 
once a fire goes into the second hour an additional hour of pay will be 
added, i.e., 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 4, etc. 

D. Police Intern : 

Plan Intern will receive 7% improvement per successive year in the 
Intern Program. 

E . L ongevity : 

Regular full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment 
of $50 after 5 years' continuous regular full-time employment plus $10 for 
each additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200, payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December. 

F. Retirees : 

A full-time employee who enters retirement under the County Retire- 
ment System may be rehired by the Town in the last occupation subject to 
the restriction of the County Retirement Program. Such employment must 
be approved in advance by the Department Head, Board of Selectmen and Per- 
sonnel Board. Such employment and wage rate, which will be considered a 
personal rate, will be subject to approval of the Department Head, Board 
of Selectmen and Personnel Board. Such wage rate will not be adjusted by 
general increase as such. 

XVI. INVALIDITY 

If any provision of this By-law shall conflict with any Civil Service 
law or regulation applicable to any position, or any other law, it shall be 
deemed modified by the law or regulation sufficiently only to end the con- 
flict. The invalidity of any provision hereof shall not be construed to 
invalidate any other provision hereof. 



XVII. CONFLICTING BY-LAWS 

All By-laws or parts of By-laws in conflict with this By-law a re 
hereby repealed. 



197 



XVIII. CLASSIFICATION AND SCHEDULES 

The classification and schedules of pay under The Plan shall be as shown 
in the appended "Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules" as from time to 
time amended. 



XIX. AMENDMENT 

This By-law may be amended by vote of the Town at any regular or special 
meeting provided that at least thirty (30) days prior to the town meeting at 
which such amendment is to be considered, the Personnel Board shall be apprised 
in writing of the proposed amendment. The Personnel Board shall make a report 
and recommendation to the Town prior to the taking of any action by the Town 
upon the proposed amendment. 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULES 

SALARIED POSITIONS 

Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Police Department 

Chief $14,178 $18,866 

Sergeant 12,577 13,100 13,759 

Patrolman 10,235 10,953 11,794 12,577 

Streets, Water and Sewer Departmen t 

Superintendent 15,312 20,416 

Fire Department 

Chief 12,266 15,771 

Executive Department 

Executive Secretary 14,745 22,684 

Administrative Secretary 8,423 8,889 9,382 9,901 10,450 

General 



Dog Officer 


8,847 








9,641 


Library 












Librarian 


6,566 


6,951 


7,290 


7,652 


8,178 


Asst. Librarian 


3,388 


3,575 


3,779 


3,989 


4,206 


Children's Librarian 


3,388 


3,575 


3,779 


3,989 


4,206 


HOURLY POSITIONS 













Listed below is a 12-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly graded 
positions are slotted. 

Grade Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

1 2.33 2.46 2,59 2.71 2.86 

2 2.54 2.67 2.80 2.93 3.07 

3 2.75 2.86 2.98 3.15 3.34 

198 



4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$642 minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Poll Worker' (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$535 minimum per season 
Laborer Intern (PTT) 

May be paid minimum wage 
Laborer (PTT) 



2.98 


3.10 


3.21 


3.39 


3.61 


3.04 


3.21 


3.39 


3.56 


3.74 


3.10 


3.34 


3.51 


3.68 


3.98 


3.51 


3.74 


3.98 


4.21 


4.43 


3.91 


4.16 


4.38 


4.61 


4.91 


4.16 


4.38 


4.61 


4.91 


5.19 


4.38 


4.61 


4.84 


5.14 


5.44 


4.49 


4.79 


5.08 


5.37 


5.67 


4.79 


5.08 


5.37 


5.67 


6.01 


HOURLY 


GRADE LISTINGS 






t Time/Temporary 


- (PTT) 




;ular - 


(R) 


GRADE 7 







Senior Secretary (R) 

Truck Driver (PTT) 

Special Police Officer (PTT) 

Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 

Call Firefighters (PTT) 

Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 



GRADE 2 
Presently no jobs 



GRADE 8 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 

Tree Climber (PTT) 

Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 



GRADE 3 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 

Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 



GRADE 9 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 



GRADE 4 

Skilled Laborer (R) 
Secretary (PTT) 



GRADE 10 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 



GRADE 5 

Collector /Bookkeeper /Secretary (R) 



GRADE 11 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator-in-Charge (R) 
Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control (PTT) 



GRADE 6 

t 
Deputy Collector/Bookkeeper (R) 
Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 



GRADE 12 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 



199 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Asst. Dog Officer 

Ambulance Serviceman 
Fire 



$488 per year 

$1,391 to $1,815 per year 

$86 to $119 per week, $749 minimum per 

season 
Fee 
$214 per year and $3.98 per hour when on 

duty 
$2.84 per run, subject to $27 minimum per 

month 



Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Town Counsel 

Veterans ' Agent 

Inspectors 

Building Inspector 
Acting Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Acting Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Acting Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Acting Wiring Inspector 



$739 per year 

$248 per year 

$188 per year 

$188 per year 

$96 to $147 per week 
$106 to $138 per week 
$70 to $86 per' week 
$142 per year 
$340 per year 
$239 per year 
$2,813 to $7,032 per year 
$1,590 per year 

$7.03 per inspection except Sanitation's 

which is $4.25 per inspection 
Annual minimum $1,361 
Annual minimum $181 
Annual minimum $376 
Annual minimum $68 
Annual minimum $1,112 
Annual minimum $255 
Annual minimum $618 
Annual minimum $181 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to amend Article 7 as written to make certain technical 
changes and to correct four typographical errors: 

Article XV D. Change "Plan" to "Police Intern" 

Article XV F. Change "the last occupation" to "their last 
occupation" 

Change "the restriction of the County Retirement 
Plan" to "the restrictions of the County Retirement 
Plan" 



Change "adjusted by general increase as such' 
"adjusted by general increases as such. 



to 



Further voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan by striking 
that plan presently in effect and substituting in place thereof the 
Personnel Administration Plan as printed in Article 7, with the above 
corrections, effective July 1, 1976. 



200 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of conduc- 
ting a management study of Town operations or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan by making 
the following addition: 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Secretary hourly 2.87 3.03 3.20 3.36 3.53 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 100 I of Chapter 
41 of the General Laws which provides that the Town shall indemnify and save 
harmless municipal officers, elected or appointed, from personal financial 
loss and expense including reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an 
amount not to exceed one million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, 
suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission including a violation of 
the civil rights of any person under any federal law, if the official at the 
time of such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official 
duties or employment. 

VOTE: Voted to accept Section 100 I Chapter 41 of the General Laws 
which provides that the Town shall indemnify and save harmless municipal 
officers, elected or appointed, from personal financial loss and expense 
including reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an amount not to 
exceed one million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, suit or 
judgment by reason of any act or omission including a violation of the civil 
rights of any person under any federal law, if the official at the time of 
such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official duties or 
employment. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pur- 
chasing equipment for the Street, Water and Landfill departments as listed, 
and authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price equip- 
ment to be replaced: 



To Be Acquired Department 



Trade 



1. Pickup Truck, 3/4 ton 

and radio and plow Water No trade, new 

2. Pickup Truck, 1 ton & plow Street 1971 International 

Chassis 

3. Street Sweeper Street 1969 Wayne 

Sweeper 



201 



A. Dozer-Loader Landfill 1970 Cat 955 

5. Riding Mower Street No trade, new 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty One Thousand, 
Thirty-seven Dollars ($51,037) for the purchase of a Pickup Truck, 1/2 
ton, 2 wheel drive and radio; a Pickup Truck, 1 ton and plow with a trade 
of the 1971 International Chassis; and a Dozer-Loader with trade of a 1970 
Cat 955. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pur- 
chasing a new 1,000 gallons per minute Class A Pumper for the Fire Depart- 
ment, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade or sell a 1941 Ford 
500 gallons per minute Pumper for part of the purchase price, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum of Sixty 
Thousand Dollars ($60,000) for the purchase of a pumper for the Fire 
Department, and authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade or sell a 
1941 Ford 500 gallons per minute pumper for part of the purchase price. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of instal- 
ling street sewers in: 

Londmeadow Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Woodfall Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Evergreen Way 

Cross-country from Kaymark Drive to 
Longmeadow Road 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sura of Five Hundred Fifty-five Thousand 
Dollars ($555,000) for the purpose of installing street sewers in: 

Longraeadow Road 

Spring Valley Road 

Woodfall Road 

Stonybrook Road 

Evergreen Way 

Cross-country from Kaymark Drive to 

Longmeadow Road 
and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by purchase, 
taking by eminent domain or otherwise such rights, titles, permits and 
easements as may be necessary to accomplish said purposes, and that the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into any and all contracts in 
connection therewith; and to accept any grants or reimbursements from 
any State or Federal authorities; and that the Water and Sewer Board be 
authorized to assess a portion of the cost of the sewers as in accor- 
dance with the bylaws of the Town of Medfield and in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 83 of the Massachusetts General Laws; and that to 

202 



raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow the sum of Five Hundred, Fifty-five 
Thousand Dollars ($555,000) under the provisions of Paragraph 15, Section 
8, Chapter 44 of the General Laws as amended. 

Yes 280 
No 30 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of con- 
structing Laboratory facilities at the Medfield Senior High School, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 
VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of Fifty- two Thousand Dollars 
($52,000) and to transfer said sum from the Stabilization Fund for the 
purpose of constructing Laboratory facilities in the Medfield Senior 
High School to be expended under the direction of the School Planning 
and Building Committee. 

Yes 328 
No 12 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pre- 
paring final design plans and for construction of a facility for the Med- 
field Police Department, said sum to be expended under the direction of the 
Police Station Study Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Police Station Study Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Seventy-five Thou- 
sand Dollars ($275,000) for the purpose of preparing final design plans 
and for construction of a facility for the Medfield Police Department 
and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow said sum under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 44, Section 7, Paragraph 3 to be expended under the 
direction of the Board of Selectmen. 

Yes 317 
No 27 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will request the School Committee to estab- 
lish a hockey program as a part of its regular athletic program and for this 
purpose appropriate a sum of money, said such funds, raised by taxation or 
taken from available funds, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Petition) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss the article. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Transportation 
Aid Account the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six Dol- 
lars ($27,976) received in accordance with Chapter 825 of the Acts of 1975 
and to borrow the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six 
Dollars ($27,976), the Town's 1977 allotment from Chapter 765 of the Acts of 
1972, for the purpose of reconstructing North Street from Main Street nor- 
therly for a distance of approximately 1,600 feet (300' northerly of Green 
Street), and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts 
necessary or incidental thereto; said funds may be used in conjunction with 
any funds allotted by the County, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water, and Sewer Department) 



203 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from the Transporatation Aid 
Account the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six 
Dollars ($27,976) received in accordance with Chapter 825 of the Acts 
of 1974 and to authorize the Treasurer to borrow the sum of Twenty- 
seven Thousand, Nine Hundred Seventy-six Dollars ($27,976), the Town's 
allotment from Chapter 765 of the Acts of 1972, for the purpose of 
reconstructing North Street from Main Street northerly for a distance 
of approximately 1,600 feet (300' northerly of Green Street), and to 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto; said funds may be used in conjunction with any 
funds allotted by the County. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of guard 
fences and posts on Main Street (Route 109) between Bridge Street and the 
Millis town line, said appropriation to be offset by funds received in ac- 
cordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971 and to authorize the Selectmen 
to enter into any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of resur- 
facing a section of High, South and Spring Streets, said appropriation to be 
offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971 
and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto; said funds may be used with any funds allotted by the 
County; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of $10,000. 
for the purpose of resurfacing a section of High, South and Spring 
Streets, said appropriation to be offset by funds to be received in 
accordance with Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1971, and authorize the 
Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary or incidental 
thereto; said funds may be used with any funds allotted by the County. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of making 
such repairs or improvements as are necessary to rehabilitate the Hinkley 
Memorial Swim Pond Site and of providing operating funds for a swimming 
program at the pond for fiscal 1977, said appropriation to be expended under 
the jurisdiction of the Park and Recreation Commission, or take any action 
relating thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of Four 
Thousand Six Hundred Dollars ($4,600) for the purpose of making such 
repairs or improvements as are necessary to rehabilitate the Hinkley 
Memorial Swim Pond Site; said appropriation to be expended under the 
jurisdiction of the Park and Recreation Commission. 



204 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised to be used with funds from 
the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 for the purpose 
of developing and improving recreational facilities at Metacomet Park, or 
take any action relating thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars 
($15,000) to be used with funds from the Federal Housing and Com- 
munity Development Act of 1974 for the purpose of developing and im- 
proving recreational facilities at Metacomet Park; Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000) to be raised by taxation and Ten Thousand Dollars 
($10,000) to be transferred from the unexpended balance of funds 
in Article 33, of the Annual Town Meeting of 1975 (Baker's Pond). 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a committee of five (5) members and authorize it to make arrange- 
ments and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance 
of Memorial Day, or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Moderator to appoint a committee of five 
members for the observance of Memorial Day and authorize said commit- 
tee to make arrangements to expend money appropriated under Article 3. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to officially name the pond im- 
mediately adjacent to the First Parish Meeting House as Meeting House Pond 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to officially name the pond immediately adjacent to the 
First Parish Meeting House as Meeting House Pond. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to officially name the following 
water courses: Mill Brook, Vine Brook, Winter Brook, North Brook, Nantasket 
Brook, Great Brook, Stop River; or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Medfield Historical Commission to offi- 
cially name said water courses within the Town as Mill Brook, Vine 
Brook, Winter Brook, North Brook, Nantasket Brook, Great Brook, Stop 
River, such action to be effective upon the filing with the Town 
Clerk of a plan showing such designated water courses, and also con- 
taining detailed descriptions. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pro- 
viding recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of Two Thou- 
sand Six Hundred Fifteen Dollars ($2,615) for the purpose of providing 
recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped. 



205 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of pain- 
ting and refurbishing the Town clock, or take any action in relation thereto, 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of Four 
Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-five Dollars ($4,735) for the purpose of 
painting and refurbishing the Town clock. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of instal- 
ling an additional traffic cycle in the traffic signals at the intersection 
of Routes 109 and 27, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum Five 
Hundred Fifty Dollars ($550) for the purpose of installing an 
additional traffic cycle in the traffic signals at the inter- 
section of Routes 109 and 27. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of 
microfilming Town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of One 
Thousand Dollars ($1,000) for the purpose of microfilming Town 
records. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of 
making a updated master plan Water Study, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Kaymark Drive Station 0+0 to Station 9+99.81 

Lakewood Drive Station 6+75.00 to Station 11+50.00 

Morse Lane Station 0+0 to Station 3+67.50 

Ridge Road Station Of 26. 84 to Station 2+90.21 

Stonybrook Road Station 11+51.62 to Station 13.58.62 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements as may be neces- 
sary to accomplish such purposes, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



206 



VOTE: Voted to accept as public ways the following named street or parts 
thereof: 

Kaymark Drive Station 0+0 to Station 9+99.81 

Lakewood Drive Station 6+75.00 to Station 11+50.00 

Morse Lane Station 0+0 to Station 3+67.50 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and autho- 
rize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, 
such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, ..as may 
be necessary to accomplish such purposes. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the town will vote to delete Section 7 of the Medfield 
Zoning Bylaw, "Signs" and substitute in place thereof the following new 
Section 7: 

SECTION 7 



SIGN CODE 



7.1 SIGNING DEFINITIONS 



7.1.1 Sign Any letters, pictorial representations, symbol, flag, 

emblem or animated device displayed in any manner 
whatsoever, which directs attention of persons off the 
premises on which the sign is displayed to any object, 
subject, place, person, activity, product, service, 
institution, organization or business. (For the pur- 
poses of this code, American flags and directional or 
traffic signs and signals erected or adopted by gov- 
ernments or their agencies are not included in this 
definition. ) 

7.1.2 Sign Surface Area - The entire area within a single rectangle (for pur- 

poses of calculation) enclosing the extreme limits of decora- 
tive structure, lettering, representations, emblems or other 
figures, together with any material or color forming an 
integral part of the display or used to differentiate the sign 
from the background against which it is placed. Structural mem- 
bers bearing no sign copy and outside of the above area are not 
included. 

7.1.3 Building Sign Frontage - The length in feet of the ground floor building 

side on which the sign is mounted. For freestanding signs, 
the length of the building side nearest the sign, or, the 
length of the entrance side, whichever is shorter. 

7.1.4 Off-premise Sign - A sign advertising activities, goods, products, ser- 

vices, etc., available elsewhere than within the building or 
on a lot where the sign is located. 

7.1.5 On-premise Sign - A sign advertising activities, goods, etc., available 

within the building or on the lot where the sign is located. 

7.1.5.1 Applied Sign - A painted or applied sign including all lettering and 

symbols together with any background color other than the 
color of the building. 

7.1.5.2 Awning Sign - A sign on or attached to a temporary retractable shelter 

that is supported entirely from the exterior wall of a build- 
ing. 

207 



7.1.5.3 Canopy Sign - A sign on or attached to a permanent overhanging shelter 

that projects from the face of the building and is supported 
entirely or partially by the building. 

7.1.5.4 Freestanding Sign - A sign supported upon the ground and not attached 

to any building. 

7.1.5.5 Parallel Sign - A wall-mounted sign parallel to the building surface 

projecting not more than 12" from that surface. 

7.1.5.6 Projecting Sign - A wall-mounted sign perpendicular to the building 

surface. 

7.1.5.7 Parking Sign - A sign at each vehicular entrance to a parking lot or 

parking garage. 

7.1.5.8 Sign Band - A sign band is a special type of parallel sign. It is a 

horizontal band, integral to the building facade, and runs the 
full length of the building, exclusive of structural or other 
interruptions . 

7.1.5.9 Window or Interior Sign - A sign painted or applied to glass doors 

or windows, or installed on the interior but visible from the 
exterior. 

7.1.5.10 Special Sign - Any sign or sign structure not included in the pre- 

vious definitions. 

7.2 SIGNING DISTRICTS - The Town of Medfield is divided into three signing 
districts, following zoning classifications. 

7.2.1 Business District - those areas of town zoned Business (B) and 
Business Industrial (BI) . 

7.2.2 Industrial Extensive - the area outside the Central Business District 

zoned IE. 

7.2.3 Residential - All other areas of the town not included above. 

7.3 PROHIBITED SIGNS AND SIGNING LIMITATIONS 

7.3.1 Off-premise signs are prohibited. 

7.3.2 No sign or light shall move, flash, or make noise. (Indicators of 
time and temperature may move.) 

7.3.3 Any imitation of official traffic signs or signals and the use of such 
words as "stop", "look", "danger", "go slow", "caution" or "warning" 
are prohibited. 

7.3.4 Signs before or behind traffic signals shall not obscure or create 
confusion when viewed from a vehicle stopped at a signal. 

7.3.5 Colored lights for sign or building illumination are prohibited in 
residential areas. This requirement does not apply to Christmas signs 
or lights, or to signs installed for a period of less than 14 days. 



208 



7.3.6 A permanent window sign may not exceed one third of the total glass 
area of the windows on the section of the building elevation occupied 
by the business the sign advertises. Any permanent window signs must 
be included in calculating the total area of signage for that eleva- 
tion. 

7.3.7 A freestanding sign may only include lettering to indicate the street 
number, the name and kind of business, service or facility conducted 
on the premises, the year the business was established, the hours of 
operation, time temperature, telephone number and lettering and sym- 
bols that are part of a trade-mark. Freestanding signs for multiple- 
occupancy buildings may display the name and kind of business for each 
occupancy. 

7.3.8 The registered trade-mark of a specific product may occupy no more 
than one quarter of the area of the sign face upon which it appears 
unless the specific product is at least 50% of the business by dollar 
volume. 

7.3.9 Off-street parking facilities for ten or more cars may be identified 
by a sign displaying the letter "P" in a size between eight (8) and 
eighteen (18) inches high, and a directional arrow indicating an en- 
trance or exit. No more than one such sign per entrance or exit is 
allowed. Such a sign may also identify the building (or its princi- 
pal occupant) to which the parking is accessory in letters not to ex- 
ceed eight (8) square feet per sign face in area and four feet in 
height. Such signs are not counted in computing total sign area. 

7.4 REQUIRED SIGNS 

7.4.1 The name, if any, and street number of any nonresidential building 
must be identified on or legible from the exterior of the building. 

7.4.2 In a nonresidential area a construction sign is required identifying 
the parties involved and the nature of the construction project, on 
the premises where the sign is located. In a residential area it is 
optional. Sign area may not be greater than 16 square feet. The 
sign must not be installed more than 14 days before construction com- 
mences and must be removed 14 days after any portion of any structure 
is occupied or after any portion of the last structure in a multiple- 
building construction project is occupied. 

7.4.3 The sign permit number issued by the Building Inspector is required 
on every sign except those existing at the time of the adoption of 
this bylaw. Also, sign permits shall not be required for window and 
temporary signs. 

7.5 TEMPORARY SIGNS 

7.5.1 Temporary window signs are allowed only if they advertise special 
sales or events lasting no more than 60 days. They may cover no more 
than one third of the area of the window in which they appear. Their 
area is not included in calculating allowable permanent sign area. 

7.5.2 Real Estate Signs: One unlighted sign of up to 8 square feet pertain- 
ing to the sale, rental or lease of the premises on which the sign is 
placed. Such signs shall be removed by the realtor within 14 days 
after final sale, rental or lease. 

209 



7.6 NUMBER OF SIGNS 

7.6.1 There shall be no more than three different types of permanent signs 
employed per building regardless of the number of occupancies. 

7.6.2 There shall be no more than one freestanding sign per building. 

7.7 LOCATION OF SIGNS 

7.7.1 A parallel sign shall project no more than 12" from the building sur- 
face. No awning, canopy or projecting sign shall project more than 
five feet from the building face or come within three feet of the 
public way reserved for vehicular traffic. 

7.7.2 The bottom of a projecting sign shall be at least ten feet above 
ground level. The bottom of any awning or canopy sign shall not be 
lower than the awning or canopy to which it is attached, and shall 
not be lower than 6 feet and 8 inches above the ground level. 

7.7.3 The surface area of a freestanding sign shall extend no higher than 
15 feet above ground level and the bottom shall not interfere with 
vehicular or pedestrian traffic. 

7.7.4 No parallel sign or any portion thereof shall be allowed above the 
bottom of the sills of second story windows of the building on which 
it is mounted. 

7.7.5 No sign or support for a sign may extend above the cornice line of 
the building to which it is attached. 

7.7.6 In a Business (B) or Business-Industrial (BI) District no freestanding 
sign shall be located nearer to the street line than the permitted 
setback distance for a building on the same lot. 

7.8 SIGN SURFACE AREA 

7.8.1 Except as noted below, the area of a sign is defined as the entire 

area within a single rectangle enclosing the extreme limits of letter- 
ing, decorative structure, logos, representations, emblems or other 
figures, together with any material or color forming an integral part 
of the sign or used to differentiate the sign from the building on 
which it is mounted. Structural members bearing no sign copy and out- 
side of the area defined above are not included in calculating sign 
area. 

7.8.1.1 For two- or three-sided freestanding or projecting signs, all vertical 
sides are included in calculating sign area, whether used for copy or 

not . 

7.8.1.2 For freestanding or projecting signs having more than three sides 
(e.g., a cube sign), the sign area is calculated as the sum of one 
less than the number of vertical sides. 

7.8.1.3 For parallel signs composed of individual letters mounted directly to 
a building, with no differentiating background color or material, the 
sign area shall be calculated as the sum of the areas of rectangles 
enclosing the individual letters. 



210 



7.8.2 In a Residential District there shall be no signs except the following: 
On a lot occupied by a dwelling there shall not be more than one sign 
pertaining to the use thereof or bearing the name and occupation of 
any occupant, or occupants, and no such sign shall exceed one square 
foot in area; for premises used for home occupations, there shall be 
no exterior signs other than a sign not to exceed one square foot in 
area, and carrying only the name and occupation of any occupant of 

the premises such as a physician, artisan, beautician, lawyer, archi- 
tect, engineer, clergyman, accountant, osteopath, dentist and similar 
occupations or professions or as allowed in Section 5.2. 

7.8.3 Business District: Maximum sign area allowed is calculated according 
to a formula based on the building sign frontage or as otherwise in- 
dicated. 

7.8.3.1 For buildings with building sign frontage less than 25 feet: 

Maximum sign area equals ten times the square root of the building 
sign frontage. 

7.8.3.2 For buildings with building sign frontage more than 25 feet: 

Maximum sign area equals fifteen times the square root of the building 
sign frontage. 

7.8.4 Industrial-Extensive District: 

7.8.4.1 Maximum sign area equals five times the square root of the building 
sign frontage. 

7.8.5 In the case where no building sign frontage exists, the maximum sign 
area allowed is 32 square feet, advertising only those activities 
conducted on the premises. 

7.8.6 Sign Area Exceptions: Allowed in addition to the maximum sign area 
are the following: 

7.8.6.1 Historic markers and commemorative tablets up to 5 square feet in area 
when made a permanent and integral part of the building. 

7.8.6.2 Signs up to 2 square feet in area, including signs identifying non- 
profit organizations, rest rooms, telephones, and other public facili- 
ties are allowed for the purposes of identification. 

7.9 ADMINISTRATION (See Section 13.2 also.) 

7.9.1 No sign, except noncommercial signs less than one square foot or spe- 
cifically enumerated in Section 7.5 Temporary Signs, shall be erected 
without a permit issued by the Building Inspector, application for 
which shall be accompanied by such scale drawings, photographs, and 
other information as the Building Inspector may require. The appli- 
cant must be the owner of the property or have the written permission 
of the owner. 

7.9.2 Fees for sign permits shall be fixed every three years by the Board 
of Selectmen. 



211 



7.9.3 Fines for violations of the Sign Bylaw shall be established by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

7.9.4 A Sign Advisory Board Shall be established for the following purposes 

a) To review periodically the existing Sign Bylaw and advise the 
Planning Board as to desirable modifications. 

b) To provide assistance and advice. 

c) To bring violations of the Sign Bylaw to the attention of the 
Zoning Enforcing Officer. 

The Sign Advisory Board members shall be appointed by the Planning 
Board and shall be composed of the following: one Planning Board 
member; one Master Plan Implementation Committee member; one member 
of Industrial Commission, three businessmen (two to be Medfield 
residents, one to be nonresident) , one member of Building Code 
Committee. 

7.10 OBSOLETE SIGNS 

7.10.1 A sign which ceases to advertise a bonafide business conducted or 
product sold on any premises shall be removed within 30 days after 
written notification from the Building Inspector. 



7.11 ALTERATION, REPAIR, AND REPLACEMENT OF ON-PREMISE SIGNS 

7.11.1 Except for copy changes on signs with changeable letter channels, no 
signs shall be reconstructed, extended, changed structurally or in 
content or repaired except in accordance with this ordinance. A 
sign which does not conform with this ordinance may be repaired pro- 
vided that the cost of repair does not exceed 50% of the replacement 
cost of the entire sign, except that an electric time and temperature 
sign which is an integral part of a nonconforming sign may be repaired' 
or replaced with no restrictions on the cost of the repair or re- 
placement. A nonconforming sign which is deemed unsafe by the 
Building Inspector shall be removed by its owner. 

or do or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaws by deleting 
Section 7 thereof entitled "Signs" and substituting in place 
thereof a new Sign Code as printed in Article 31. 



212 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Conservation Fund and determine in what manner the money will be raised, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of Three 
Thousand Dollars ($3,000) said sum to be transferred to the Conser- 
vation Fund. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Conservation Commission to acquire by easement, purchase, gift 
or eminent domain the fee or any lesser interest including such leasehold or 
life tenancy interest as the Selectmen shall determine in the developed and 
undeveloped land on Noon Hill bounded in general by the Stop River, Causeway 
Street, Orchard Street and Indian Hill Road and vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to utilize the funds appropriated under Article 10 of the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting as amended by Article 1 of the November 3, 1975 Special 
Town Meeting for these purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen of the Town be authorized to 
acquire by gift, purchase or eminent domain for conservation and out- 
door recreational purposes the fee or any lesser interest including 
such leasehold or life tenancy interest as the Selectmen shall deter- 
mine in the following parcels of land: 

Lot 42, on Map 2 

Lots 13, 21, 22 on Map 8 

Lots 3, 4, 5 on Map 9 

Lot 12 on Map 10 

Lot 16 on Map 14 

Lot 1 on Map 16 
of the Medfield Assessor's Maps; and that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to develop said land for said purposes and to enter into 
contracts and agreements with the Trustees of Reservations for joint 
development of the available land with adjacent land owned by the 
Trustees, and that the sum of One Million, One Hundred Thirty Thou- 
sand, Four Hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($1,130,450), which sum was 
appropriated under Article 10 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting as 
amended by Article 1 of the November 3, 1975 Special Town Meeting, 
be used for acquisition of the said parcels and that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow One Million, Ninety-six Thousand, Four Hundred 
and Fifty Dollars ($1,096,450), which authorization was provided 
for by Article 10 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting as amended, under 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws as amended and further that the sum 
of Thirty-four Thousand Dollars ($34,000), which was transferred 
from the Stabilization Fund under the provisions of Article 10 of 
the Annual Town Meeting as amended, is to be made available for the 
above purposes and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
apply and contract for Federal and State aid and any other public 
or private sources for the purposes of this vote. 

Yes 162 
No 76 

(Note: A Quorum count was taken and there were 267 
present. ) 



213 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to delete and exclude the property 
of Patrick S. Harris, Lot 16 on Map 14, from the land authorized for acqui- 
sition by easement, gift, purchase or eminent domain, authorized by Article 
10 of the 1974 Town Meeting. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from the Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction 
of the Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Assessors be authorized to use the sum of 
One Hundred Five Thousand Dollars ($105,000) from Free Cash for the re- 
duction of the tax rate. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following-named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Adelbert Kilmer Lot $100.00 

Lawrence Alger Lot 200.00 

Charles Alger Lot 200.00 

John Alger Lot 100.00 

Greta Mann Lot 100.00 

Robert Alger Lot 200.00 

Olga Harrington Lot 200.00 

Barbara Alger Lot 100.00 

Joseph Zanstuck Lot 200.00 

Alexander Johnson Lot 100.00 

Forrest Parker Lot 100.00 

Walter Sabbag Lot 400.00 

Charles Austin Lot 200.00 

Garfield Farrell Lot 200.00 

Joseph Lanseigne Lot 200.00 

Irma Pickard Lot 100.00 

Bruce Reith Lot 200.00 

Robert J. Davidson Lot 300.00 

Rae J. Conway Lot 200.00 

Walter Marks Lot 200.00 

William Doub Lot 200.00 

VOTE: Voted to accept the sums mentioned in Article 36 as Perpetual 
Trust Funds for the care of lots designated therein in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery and to use said funds together with any interest thereon as 
may be necessary for said care. 



214 



The meeting was dissolved as 11:40 P.M. 

(NOTE: At 10:45 a decision was made that it would be possible to 
finish the warrant within the time left. Due to extended debate 
at 11:15 P.M., the Moderator asked for a suspension of the rules 
in order to finish the meeting; there being no objections, the 
meeting was continued.) 



A true copy attest: 



Nancy J. P^e^ton 
Town Clerk 



August 4, 1976 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendment to the Zoning By-laws adopted under Article 31 of 
the warrant is hereby approved with the exception that Section 7.9.3 is 
deleted. 

Attorney General 



215 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN WARRANT 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Conmionwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School, in said Med- 
field, on Monday, the twenty-sixth day of April A.D. , 1976 at 7:30 P.M., then 
and there to act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order at 8:00 P.M. by the Moderator at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept an amendment to the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District Agreement initiated and 
proposed by vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 
District Committee adopted on June 11, 1975 and entitled "Amendment No. 3 to 
the Agreement Establishing the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District", which proposed Amendment provides in substance for the 
withdrawal of the Town of Norfolk as a member town of the regional school 
district: that upon such withdrawal, the Town of Norfolk will remain liable 
for the payment of its apportioned share of the capital operating costs of 
the District for the year in which such withdrawal becomes effective and, if 
such withdrawal becomes effective between February 1 and July 1 of any year, 
for its apportioned share of the capital and operating costs of the District 
for the next succeeding fiscal year; and that the Town of Norfolk will 
thereafter remain liable for the payment of its share of the capital costs 
of the District representing principal and interest on bonds or notes of the 
District issued to a principal amount not exceeding $15,000,000. for construc- 
ting and equipping the initial regional vocational technical school, such 
share being based upon the average of the Town of Norfolk's capital cost 
apportionment percentage for the fiscal years preceding the fiscal year in 
which the withdrawal of the Town of Norfolk becomes effective. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted not to accept an amendment to the Tri-County Regional 
Vocational Technical School District Agreement initiated and pro- 
posed by vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee adopted on June 11, 1975 and entitled 
"Amendment No. 3 to the Agreement Establishing the Tri-County 
Regional Vocational Technical School District" as outlined in 
Article 1. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Account A163-00-400 Reserve Fund for the fiscal period 
ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Warrant Committee) 



216 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum of 
Twenty-five Thousand Dollars ($25,000) to Account A163-00-400 Reserve 
Fund for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1976. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Account 111-05-200 Traffic Markings and Signs for the 
fiscal period ending June 30, 1976 or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum of 
Twenty-five Hundred Dollars ($2,500) to Account Alll-05-200 Traffic 
Markings and Signs for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1976. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Account Alll-04-200 Police Communications for the fiscal 
period ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum of 

Nine Hundred Dollars ($900) to Account Alll-04-200 Police Communications 

for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1976. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Accounts A116-00-100 and 200 Plumbing Inspector for the 
fiscal period ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation there- 
to. 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Accounts A117-00-100 and 200 Gas Inspector for the fiscal 
period ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Accounts A130-00-100 and 200 Landfill for the fiscal 
period ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash to Account 
130-00 Landfill the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000) to the 
100 series, and the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000) to the 
200 series, for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1976. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from 
Available Funds to Account A145-00-200 Cemetery Commission for the fiscal 
period ending June 30, 1976, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum of 
One Thousand Four Hundred Twenty Dollars ($1,420) to Account A145- 
00-200 Cemetery Commission for the fiscal period ending June 30, 
1976. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purposes of de- 
signing and constructing street sewers within the Town of Medfield, and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Board to enter into contracts with the State 
and Federal governments for this purpose, and to accept Federal and State 
grants, or reimbursements, or take any other action relating thereto. 



217 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of Five Million Five Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($5,500,000) for the purpose of designing and cons- 
tructing street sewers in the Town of Medfield, and that the Board 
of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by purchase, taking by emi- 
nent domain or otherwise such rights, titles, permits and ease- 
ments as are necessary; and to accomplish said purposes, that 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into contracts with 
the State and Federal governments and to accept any applicable 
Federal and State grants or reimbursements; and that the Water 
and Sewer Board be authorized to assess a portion of the costs 
of said sewers in accordance with the by-laws of the Town of 
Medfield and in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 83 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws; and to raise this appropriation, 
the Treasurer be authorized to borrow with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen the sum of Five Million Five Hundred Thousand 
Dollars ($5,500,000) under General Laws, Paragraph 15, Section 
8. Chapter 44 as amended. 

Yes 349 
No 88 

RESOL\TD: That the Board of Selectmen and the Water and Sewer Board be 
instructed not to proceed with construction of the sewers called for in 
this article unless 90% Federal and State grants are available and com- 
mitted to this project. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money and deter- 
mine in what manner the funds will be raised to provide for final pay- 
ment and interest charges for work performed in connection with the 
relocation of utilities under Route 27 for the above, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate and transfer from free cash the sum 
of Five Thousand One Hundred Forty-six Dollars and Thirty Cents 
($5,146.30) to provide for final payment and interest charges 
in connection with the relocation of utilities under Route 27. 

The meeting was dissolved at 9:07 P.M. 

and you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 6th day of April, Nineteen Hundred and Seventy 
Six A.D. 

R. EduJoAjd BojOLAd 
HoAALj A. KdilokoA 
WWUcum R. Rmgan 

Selectmen of Medfield 



218 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Medfield, Massachusetts 

April 17, 1976 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections to meet at the tine 
and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in 
not less that five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven 
days before the time of holding said meeting. 

{Jj^ttlam H. Mann 
Constable of Medfield 



A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. ?^eJ>ton 
Town Clerk 



219 



TOWN WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to 
meet in Memorial School. 

TUESDAY, the FOURTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1976 

at 10:00 A.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of 
Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 

UNITED STATES SENATOR for this Commonwealth 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS for 10th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR for 2nd Councillor 

Middlesex & Norfolk Dist 

SENATOR for 2nd Senatorial 

Middlesex & Norfolk Dist. 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT .... for 59th Representative 

CLERK OF COURTS for Norfolk County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS for Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (2) for Norfolk County 

(Except Nantucket & Suffolk Counties) 

VACANCIES 

IN NORFOLK COUNTY: A District Attorney for Norfolk District 



The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of the warrant with your doings thereon 
at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of August, A.D. , 1976. 

A true copy attest: 

R. EdiAXVid BoMAd 
HoAALf A. KdULo^koA 
l}}WUjajm R. Rojxqan 
Selectmen of Medfield 

220 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Medfield, Massachusetts 

Norfolk, ss. September 3, 1976 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less 
than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven (7) days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 

WXIMam H. Mann 
Constable of Medfield 



221 



STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 14,1976 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the meeting was opened at 10:00 A.M. 
by the reading of the warrant. The ballot boxes were checked and found to be 
in working order, voting lists displayed and instructions to voters and spe- 
cimen ballots posted within the polling place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts. 

Warden: John Ganley 

Deputy Warden: Richard DeSorgher 

Clerks: 

Precinct 1 Barbara Connors 

Precinct 2 Florence Roberts 

Precinct 3 Beatrice Bangs 

Precinct 4 Phyllis Wilmarth 

Tellers: 

Precinct 1 Mary MairEtienne 

Precinct 2 Anna Murphy 

Precinct 3 Mary Lovell 

Precinct A Edna Hinkley 

Extra Counters: 

Susan Thornton 
Elizabeth Ippoliti 
Phyllis Roberts 
Janet 0' Toole 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 475. 

The tabulation and counting of ballots cast was as follows: 

REPUBLICAN PARTY: 

Senator in Congress Michael S. Robertson 113 

Blanks 8 

Congressman Margaret Heckler 108 

Blanks 13 

Councillor Blanks 121 

Senator David H. Locke 106 

Blanks 15 

Rep. in General Court George R. Sprague 113 

Blanks 8 

Clerk of Courts Blanks 121 



222 



Register of Deeds 
County Commissioner 
District Attorney 



Blanks 
Blanks 
Blanks 



121 
242 
121 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY: 

Senator in Congress 



Congressman 



Councillor 



Senator 



Edward M. Kennedy 


233 


Robert Emmet Dinsmore 


81 


Frederick C. Langone 


30 


Bernard P. Shannon 


7 


Blanks 


3 


Blanks 


352 


Scattered 


2 


George F. Cronin, Jr. 


174 


Frank J. Guaragna 


79 


Blanks 


101 



Blanks 



354 



Rep. in General Court 


Blanks 
Scattered 


352 
2 


Clerk of Courts 


John P. Concannon 
Blanks 


216 
138 


Register of Deeds 


Barry T. Hannon 
Blanks 


216 
138 


County Commissioner 


James J. Collins 
George B. McDonald 
Paul E. Barry 
Edmund P. Harrington 
Blanks 


162 
123 
84 
119 
220 


District Attorney 


William D. Delahunt 
Blanks 


238 
116 



After the results were publicly announced, the ballots, 
and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe 
scribed by law. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. ?^ej>toyi 
Town Clerk 



tally sheets 
keeping as pre- 



223 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN WARRANT 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs to meet at the Dale Street School in said Medfield on Monday, 
the eighteenth day of October, A.D. , 1976, at 7:30 P.M. then and there to act 
on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 8:00 P.M. after 
ascertaining that a quorum was present. 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of making 
an updated master plan Water Study, or do or act anything in relation there- 
to. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Thirty-five Thousand Dollars 
($35,000) from Free Cash for the purpose of making an updated master 
plan Water Study and that the Water and Sewerage Board be authorized 
to enter into contracts for that purpose. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Vocational Education 8000-01-400 Account to provide for payment of fiscal 
1976 vocational education expenses and determine in what manner the funds 
shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Department) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Three Thousand, Seventy-nine 
Dollars and Twenty-five Cents ($3,079.25) from Free Cash to the 
Vocational Education 8000-01-400 Account to pay bills for voca- 
tional education expenses incurred in fiscal year 1976. The 
vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for final 
payment of bills in connection with the construction of Carol Ann Drive 
and determine in what manner the funds shall be raised or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Eight Hundred Seventy-seven 
Dollars and Ninety-three Cents ($877.93) from Free Cash for the 
payment of additional costs of construction of Carol Ann Drive. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of fully 
signalizing traffic and pedestrian control signal at the intersection of 
North Meadows Road and West Street, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



224 



VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Four Thousand, One Hundred Dollars 
($4,100) from the balance of Article 20 of the 1975 Annual Town 
Meeting and that the sum of Twenty Thousand, Nine Hundred Dollars 
($20,900) be appropriated from the Revenue Sharing Account for the 
purpose of fully signalizing traffic and pedestrian control signals 
at the intersection of North Meadows Road and West Street and that 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into contracts for 
that purpose. 

ARTICLE 5. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate, borrow or transfer from available funds for the preparation of 
preliminary and final plans and specifications for the construction of an 
addition to the Medfield Public Library, and to see if the Town will vote 
to authorize the Board of Library Trustees to enter into contracts for 
same, to approve payment of bills, and to accept the plans and specifica- 
tions when completed, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Library Study Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Two Thousand, Five Hundred Dollars 
($2,500) from Free Cash for the preparation of preliminary and final 
plans and specifications for the construction of an addition to the 
Medfield Public Library and that the Board of Library Trustees be 
authorized to enter into contracts for that purpose and to accept 
the plans and specifications when completed. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money to provide 
for drainage and water quality improvements at the Stephen Hinkley Memorial 
Swim Pond and determine in what manner the funds will be raised, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of money to 
the Vehicle Insurance A155-01-200 Operations Account, Workmen's Compen- 
sation Insurance A155-02-200 Operations Account and Property and Liability 
Insurance A155-03-200 Operations Account and determine in what manner the 
funds shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Fifteen Thousand, Four Hundred Fifty- 
nine Dollars ($15,459) from Free Cash to the following accounts: 
Vehicle Insurance A155-01-200 $6,996 
Workmen's Compensation Insurance 

A155-02-200 $6,712 
Property & Liability Insurance 

A155-03-200 $1,751 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the School Department to provide for negotiated salary increases for School 
Department employees, determine in what manner the funds shall be raised, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Department) 



225 



VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of One Hundred Thirty-six Thousand, 
Two Hundred Thirty Dollars ($136,230) from Free Cash to the School 
Department to provide for negotiated salary increases for School 
Department employees. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of Pos- 
itions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan as follows: 

Remove the classification of Poll Worker from Grade 1 and add Poll 
Worker to Special Rate/Fee Positions, Part-time/Temporary with rate range 
of $2. 78 per hour. 

Remove the classification of Tree Climber from Grade 8 and add Tree 
Climber to Special Rate/Fee Positions, Part-time/Temporary with a rate 
range of $3.04 to $4.91 per hour. 

Add position of Street Inspector to Special Rate/Fee positions, Part- 
time/Temporary at a rate of $3.69 per hour. 

Add position of Zoning Enforcing Officer to Special Rate/Fee Positions, 
Part-time/Temporary at a rate of $7.03 per inspection. 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules 
of the Personnel Administration Plan be amended as set out in Article 
9 of the warrant. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, Section XV and Section XVII, so as to read as follows: 

(Section) XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS 

C. Fire Pay: 

1. All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed 
minimum of two (2) hours' fire pay. 

2. Town employees responding as call firemen will receive one 
(1) hour at their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's 
duration. 

a. Should the fire continue beyond the one (1) hour, 
normal fire pay will apply for the duration of the fire. 

3. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an addi- 
tional premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. 
This means that once a fire goes into the second hour an additional 
hour of pay will be added, i.e., 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 
4, etc. 

(Section) XVII. CONFLICTING BY-LAWS 

All By-laws or parts of By-laws relating to personnel covered by 
this Plan in conflict with this By-law are hereby repealed. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



226 



(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan Section XV and 
Section XVIII be amended as follows: 

(Section) XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS 

C. Fire Pay: 

1. All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed 
minimum of two (2) hours' fire pay. 

2. Town employees who leave their Town employment to respond to a 
fire as call firemen will receive one (1) hour pay at their Town 
job regular hourly rate, in addition to the two (2) hours' fire pay 
referenced in Item 1 above. This applies to the first two hours 

of the fire. 

Should the fire continue beyond two (2) hours, their regular 
fire pay will continue. 

3. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. This means 
that once a fire goes into the second hour an additional hour of pay 
will be added, i.e., 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 4, etc. 

(Section) XVII. CONFLICTING BY-LAWS 

All By-laws or parts of By-laws relating to personnel covered 
by this Plan in conflict with this By-law are hereby repealed. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Police Communications A111-04-200 Account, determine in what manner the 
funds shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Eight Hundred Dollars ($800) be trans- 
ferred from Free Cash to the Police Communications Alll-04-200 
Account. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Water Department A140-00-500 Account, determine in what manner the funds 
shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water Department) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum will be raised to be used for the purpose 
of purchasing and installing a Hurst Tool, or take any action in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



227 



VOTE: Voted that the sum of Four Thousand Nine Hundred Forty-seven 
Dollars ($4,947) be transferred from the balance of funds remaining 
under Article 12 of the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose 
of purchasing and installing a Hurst Tool. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to employ one of its own members as an Assessor/Appraiser and to vote to fix 
the salary of such appointed, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
suitable memorials under the auspices of the Beckwith Post No. 110 American 
Legion for the purpose of properly commemorating the services and sacrifices 
of persons who served in the Vietnam Campaign, and determine in what manner 
the money shall be raised, or take any action in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Four Hundred Dollars ($400) be trans- 
ferred from Free Cash for suitable memorials under the auspices 
of the Beckwith Post No. 110 American Legion for the purpose of 
properly commemorating the services and sacrifices of persons who 
served in the Vietnam Campaign. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate an additional sum of 

money for constructing and equipping of a Police Station and determine in 

what manner the money shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Thirty-five Thousand Dollars ($35,000) 
be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account to be expended for 
constructing and equipping of a Police Station. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to apply for, receive and expend funds under the provisions of the Pub- 
lic Works Employment Act of 1976 and for this purpose to enter into con- 
tracts with the State and/or Federal Government, or do or act anything in 

relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply for, 
receive and expend funds under the provisions of the Public Works 
Employment Act of 1976 and to enter into contracts with the State 
and/or Federal Governments for this purpose. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to be 
used with funds from the Town of Millis for the purpose of rating the Orchard 
Street bridge in accordance with State statutory requirements, determine in 
what manner the money is to be raised, or take any action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars ($1,500) be 
transferred from the unexpended balance of the funds appropriated 
under Article 14 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting to be used with 



228 



funds from the Town of Millis for the purpose of rating the Orchard Street 
bridge in accordance with State statutory requirements. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Fire Department operations budget Account A112-02-500 to provide for pur- 
chase of a replacement mobile radio and for purchase of a reconditioned fire 
alarm panel, and associated equipment, determine in what manner the money 
shall be raised, or take any other action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750) be 
transferred from Free Cash to the Fire Department operations budget 
Account A112-02-500 for the purchase of a mobile radio. 

RESOLUTION 

RESOLVE that it is the consensus of this Town Meeting that the Board of 
Selectmen and Water and Sewer Commissioner enter into negotiations with the 
appropriate authorities of the Town of Millis for the purpose of determining 
terms and conditions upon which the Town of Millis may be permitted to con- 
nect to the Medfield sewer system, subject to final approval by the Medfield 
Town Meeting. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

RESOLVE that all Town boards having control of school buildings allow any 
group of ten or more citizens to utilize Town facilities for educational, 
recreational, or Town sponsored activities, at no cost, providing the group 
posts a reasonable bond to cover any damage to those facilites, and satisfies 
reasonable regulations promulgated by the controlling board. 



The meeting was dissolved as 10:30 P.M. 

and you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy there- 
of, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at 
least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 28th day of September A.D. Nineteen Hundred and 
Seventy-six. 

R. EdioaAd Bm/id 
HoAAy A. KdUidkoA 
OJltU.am R. R^jolqolyi 

Selectmen of Medfield 



229 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Medfield, Massachusetts 

October 8, 1976 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time 
and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not 
less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 

GQ,o-i,ge, W. King6buAy 
Constable 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. V^Oybton 
Town Clerk 



230 



WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

In the name of the Coiranonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to meet 
at the Memorial School Auditorium, Adams St. , in said Medfield on: 

TUESDAY, the SECOND DAY of NOVEMBER, 1976 

at 6:00 A.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Election Officers for the Election of Candidates 
for the following offices: 

PRESIDENT, VICE PRESIDENT of the United States of America 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS . for this Commonwealth 

CONGRESSMAN for lOth Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR for 2nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT for 2nd Senatorial District 

Middlesex and Norfolk 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT . . . .for 59th Representative District 

CLERK OF COURTS for County of Norfolk 

REGISTER OF DEEDS for District of Norfolk 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (2) for County of Norfolk 

IN NORFOLK COUNTY: A DISTRICT ATTORNEY for the District of Norfolk 

BALLOT QUESTIONS 

QUESTION NO. 1 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions 
of the House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973, by a vote of 
261 - 0, and on May 14, 1975, by a vote of 217 - 55? 

YES 

NO 



SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would provide that equality under the law may 
not be denied or abridged on the basis of sex, race, color, creed or national 
origin. This amendment adds one sentence to Article 1 of Part the First of 
the Constitution which now contains a general statement of individual rights, 
including the right to enjoy and defend life and liberty and the right to ac- 
quire and protect property. 



231 



QUESTION NO. 2 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions 
of the House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973, by a vote of 
199 - 66, and on May 7, 1975, by a vote of 228 - 41? 

YES 

NO 



SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to substitute 
for the present system of flat or uniform personal income tax rates a system 
of rates graduated according to the total amount of income received. The 
Legislature would also be authorized to provide for reasonable exemptions, 
deductions, credits, and abatements and could base Massachusetts income tax 
provisions on provisions of Federal income tax law. 



QUESTION NO. 3 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions 
of the House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973 by a vote of 
259 - 0, and on May 12, 1976, by a vote of 262 - 1? 

YES 

NO 



SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to provide for 
absentee voting by persons who hold religious beliefs in conflict with the 
act of voting on the day on which any election is to be held. 



QUESTION NO. 4 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the 
House of Representatives on May 5, 1975, by a vote of 179 - 46, and on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate before May 7, 1975? 

YES 

NO 



232 



SUMMARY 

SECTION 1 of the act inserts a new chapter 164B into the General Laws 
and establishes a Massachusetts Power Authority, a body corporate and politic 
with seven members appointed by the Governor to staggered six year terms. 
The Authority is to establish and operate a bulk power supply system to sup- 
ply wholesale electric power to utilities throughout the Commonwealth. The 
primary purpose of the Authority is to supply the Commonwealth with power 
with the minimum adverse impact on the environment. The Authority is also 
authorized to engage in research and development of new sources of power, 
new siting techniques, and methods of environmental protection. 

In carrying out its responsibilities, the Authority is authorized to 
adopt by-laws; adopt an official seal; maintain offices; sue and be sued; 
construct or acquire facilities either within or without the Commonwealth; 
issue revenue bonds and borrow money in anticipation of issuance of revenue 
bonds; acquire real and personal property; employ professional, managerial 
and other employees deemed necessary and fix their compensation to be paid 
solely out of revenues of the Authority; appear before other government 
agencies; apply for and receive federal or other grants of funds; and enter 
into contracts and agreements. 

The Authority will build and operate all new generation and transmission 
facilities in the Commonwealth and has the option to purchase existing faci- 
lities through negotiation, condemnation, or eminent domain. After an ini- 
tial two-year period, no other utility may construct a new facility unless 
the Authority certifies that it lacks the capability to finance the facility, 
and the facility would further the purposes of the act. 

The Authority will finance its activities by issuing revenue bonds. The 
bonds will be exempt from state taxation, but will not be backed by the full 
faith and credit of the Commonwealth. Power will be sold to other utilities 
by contract but no special discounts or bonuses to promote increased use of 
power may be given. Public hearings are required on all major contracts. 

The Authority is required to develop a master, 20-year demand study and 
siting plan within 18 months of its incorporation, to be updated each suc- 
ceeding year. Sites will be selected in accordance with the Electric Power 
Facilities Siting Council Act of 1973. The Governor and the community in 
which any facility is to be located must affirmatively approve the facility 
before it can be constructed. 

The Authority will be subject to all applicable federal and state envi- 
ronmental standards and must be in all necessary federal and state permits 
and complete all necessary environmental impact statements. 

The Authority will be exempt from taxation but will make payments in 
lieu of taxes to cities and towns in an amount equal to the tax which would 
be paid if the Authority' s real and personal property were owned by a pri- 
vate electric utility company. 

The Authority is forbidden from engaging in promotional or image adver- 
tising. The Authority has the authority to bargain collectively with its 
employees and is subject to the provisions of Chapter 150 of the General Laws 
which governs the conciliation and arbitration of industrial disputes. Em- 
ployees of the Authority are not subject to the civil service laws and rules. 
Employees of utilities displaced by the activities of the Authority have 
first preference in employment by the Authority. 



233 



SECTION 2 of the act amends section 43 of Chapter 164 of the General 
Laws to provide that if a city or town votes, in accordance with the pro- 
vision of Chapter 164, to establish a municipal utility and acquire the faci- 
lities of the utility currently serving the community, and the utility re- 
fuses to sell its property to the city or town, that the Department of Public 
Utilities will establish a fair price for the facilities, and the utility 
will be required to accept the price determined by the department and tender 
the deed for the facilities to the city or town. 



QUESTION NO. 5 

(This question appeared as question 5(a) in the 
Information for Voters booklet.) 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the 
House of Representatives on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 197 - 35, and on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 

YES 

NO 



SUMMARY 

The proposed legislation would prohibit the possession, ownership, or 
sale of any weapon from which a shot or bullet can be discharged and which 
has a barrel length of less than sixteen inches. The prohibition would not 
apply to military personnel, law enforcement officers, federally licensed 
handgun manufacturers and wholesalers, common carriers in the ordinary course 
of transport, or to historical societies and museums. The act would not af- 
fect the possession of rifles, shotguns, and certain antiques and replicas. 
The proposal also does not change the existing statutory penalties for un- 
lawful possession, ownership or sale of handguns, including the provision 
imposing mandatory jail sentences. 

The proposal would permit owners of handguns to surrender their weapons 
to any law enforcement agency in the Commonwealth within six months of the 
effective date of the act without incurring criminal liability. Those sur- 
rendering handguns within that six months will be compensated at a rate to be 
determined by the Commissioner of Public Safety. 



QUESTION NO. 6 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the 
House of Representatives on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 146 - 85, and on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 

YES 

NO 



234 



SUMMARY 

The proposed act would require every beverage container sold or offered 
for sale in the Commonwealth to have a refund value of at least five (5) 
cents, and would prohibit the sale of metal beverage containers with fliptops. 
It would apply to containers for beer and other malt beverages and to soft 
drinks. It would not apply to containers for dairy products or natural fruit 
juices, nor to containers which are bio-degradable. 

The act would authorize the Secretary of Environmental Affairs to certify 
containers as reusable or recyclable. It contains both enforcement and pe- 
nalty provisions and would take effect on February 1, 1977. 



QUESTION NO. 7 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the 
House of Representatives on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 182 - 49, and on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 

YES 

NO 



SUMMARY 

The proposed act would impose a general requirement that every electric 
utility company charge a uniform rate per kilowatt hour of electricity. The 
proposed act would except from this general rule rates charged to other elec- 
tric utility companies and to residential customers who heat their principle 
place of residence by electricity. The act would also permit a different 
rate to be charged residential customers for the first three hundred (300) 
kilowatt hours they consume each month, and would authorize "peak load" pri- 
cing whereby a higher rate than the uniform rate per kilowatt hour may be 
charged during the periods of the day or seasons of the year when consump- 
tion of electricity is the greatest. The act would authorize the Department 
of Public Utilities to issue implementing rules and regulations and provides 
for enforcement. 



QUESTION NO. 8 

THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: 
"Shall the General Court enact legislation authorizing the construction of 
an oil refinery and a deep water port, subject to the approval of those com- 
munities directly affected and any reservations that the General Court may 
prescribe?" 

YES 

NO 



235 



SUMMARY 

The Legislature has placed this question on the ballot in order to deter- 
mine whether the people favor or oppose the construction of an oil refinery 
and deep water port in Massachusetts. The vote on this question is not 
binding on the Legislature. The question deals with the general advisability 
of such construction and is not a specific proposal for a facility. If a 
specific proposal is made, it would be subject to approval by the communities 
directly affected and subject to any restrictions imposed by the Legislature. 



QUESTION NO. 9 

THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: 
"Shall retail stores including package liquor stores, so called, be allowed 
to open for business on Sunday?" 

YES 

NO 

SUMMARY 



The Legislature has placed this question on the ballot in order to deter- 
mine whether the people favor or oppose the Sunday opening of certain retail 
stores, including package liquor stores. As the law now stands, most retail 
and all package liquor stores must be closed on Sundays. The vote on this 
question is not binding on the Legislature. 



The polls will be open from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon 

at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 19th day of October, A.D., 1976. 

A true copy attest: 

R. EdwoAd B^jOAd 
HoAAy k.K^ZlQAkdn. 
liiWium R. Rojigan 
Selectmen of Medfield 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. October 22, 1976 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said Warrant in not less 
than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven (7) days 
before the time of holding the meeting. 

O/xXeXo/n H. fAann 
Constable of Medfield 



236 



PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 2, 1976 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant the meeting was opened at 6:00 A.M. 
The ballot boxes were checked and found to be in working order, voting lists 
displayed and instructions to voters and specimen ballots posted within the 
polling place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts. 

PRECINCT 1 

Warden: John Ganley 
Clerk: Florence Roberts 
Tellers: Mary MairEtienne 

Mary Lovell 

Maybelle Maguire 

PRECINCT 2 



Warden : 


Dwight Adams 


Clerk: 


Phyllis Ripley 


Tellers: 


Judith Hinkley 




Muriel Harris 




Joan Bus sow 




Marie Kilmer 


PRECINCT 3 




Warden: 


Peter Hinkley 


Clerk: 


Beatrice Bangs 


Tellers: 


Edna Hinkley 



PRECINCT 4 



Warden: 

Clerk: 

Tellers: 



Anna Murphy 
Phyllis Roberts 
Marion Bosselman 
Edward S . Bayliss 



Elmer 0. Portmann 
Clara DeNucci 
Margaret Marr 
Phyllis Wilmarth 
Barbara Connors 
Martha Welch 



The polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 5013. This included 248 absentee ballots, 



237 



The tabulation and counting of ballots cast was as follows: 



PRESIDENT 



PRECINCTS: 



TOTAL 



Anderson & Shackleford 
Came jo & Re id 
Carter & Mondale 
Ford & Dole 
LaRouche, Jr. & Evans 
McCarthy & Stouffer 
Buber & Dodge 
Levin & Bloraen 
MacBride & Berglund 
Wright & Spock 
Blanks 
Scattered 
Total 



2 


2 


4 


2 


10 


2 


1 





1 


4 


403 


518 


494 


501 


1916 


562 


714 


856 


767 


2899 


3 


2 


3 


4 


12 


21 


31 


30 


35 


117 
































1 











1 











1 


1 


8 


17 


15 


10 


50 








2 


1 


3 



1002 1285 1404 



1322 



5013 



SENATOR 



Edward M. Kennedy 
Michael S. Robertson 
Carol Henderson Evans 
H. Graham Lowry 
Blanks 
Total 



563 


705 


716 


712 


2696 


410 


534 


647 


574 


2165 


11 


3 


9 


9 


32 


7 


8 


5 


6 


26 


11 


35 


27 


21 


94 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



5013 



CONGRESS 



Margaret M. 
Blanks 
Scattered 
Total 



Heckler 



779 1045 1121 1066 

220 239 276 251 

3 17 5 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



4011 
986 

16 

5013 



COUNCILLOR 



George F. Cronin, Jr. 

Blanks 

Scattered 

Total 



678 


903 


961 


906 


3448 


323 


382 


443 


416 


1564 


1 











1 



1002 1285 1404 



1322 



5013 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 



David H. Locke 
Blanks 
Scattered 
Total 



738 


972 


1067 


1003 


3780 


262 


312 


337 


318 


1229 


2 


1 





1 


4 



1002 



1285 1404 



1322 



5013 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



George R. Spragua 
Blanks 
Scattered 
Total 



768 

233 

1 



1017 

268 





1002 1285 



1123 
281 



1404 



1042 
279 

1 

1322 



3950 
1061 

2 

5013 



238 



CLERK OF COURTS 



John P. Concannon 

Blanks 

Scattered 

Total 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Barry T. Hannon 
Blanks 
Scattered 
Total 



664 


915 


970 


932 


3481 


338 


370 


434 


389 


1531 











1 


1 


1002 


1285 


1404 


1322 


5013 


666 


913 


976 


935 


3490 


336 


372 


428 


386 


1522 











1 


1 



1002 



1285 1404 1322 



5013 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 



James J. Collins 

George B. MacDonald 

Blanks 

Scattered 

Total 



616 


838 


917 


853 


3224 


559 


749 


855 


775 


2938 


829 


983 


1C36 


1014 


3862 











2 


2 



2004 2570 2808 2644 



10026 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



William D. Delahunt 


Louis Goldstein 


Blanks 




Scattered 


I 


Total 




QUESTION 


#1 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


#2 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


#3 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


#4 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 





640 


814 


853 


831 


3138 


183 


238 


311 


267 


999 


179 


232 


239 


224 


874 





1 


1 





2 



1002 1285 



1404 



1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



5013 



579 


739 


830 


762 


2910 


385 


498 


548 


517 


1948 


38 


48 


26 


43 


155 



5013 



209 


265 


224 


247 


945 


760 


967 


1149 


1028 


3904 


33 


53 


31 


47 


164 



5013 



477 


629 


714 


612 


2432 


490 


603 


655 


645 


2393 


35 


53 


35 


65 


188 



5013 



122 


158 


132 


167 


579 


836 


1064 


1222 


1098 


4226 


44 


63 


50 


57 


214 



1002 1285 1404 



1322 



5013 



239 



QUESTION 


#5 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


#6 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


//7 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


//8 


YES 




NO 




Blanks 




Total 




QUESTION 


#9 


YES 
NO 




Blanks 




Total 





328 


408 


512 


455 


1703 


643 


839 


870 


846 


3198 


31 


38 


22 


21 


112 



1002 1285 



1404 



1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



1002 1285 1404 1322 



5013 



503 


660 


725 


701 


2589 


486 


603 


666 


597 


2352 


13 


22 


13 


24 


72 



5013 



250 


283 


307 


297 


1137 


722 


954 


1077 


978 


3731 


30 


48 


20 


47 


145 



5013 



679 


850 


983 


862 


3374 


270 


368 


367 


390 


1395 


53 


67 


54 


70 


244 



5013 



559 


680 


838 


716 


2793 


402 


560 


529 


551 


2042 


41 


45 


37 


55 


178 



1002 1285 



1404 



1322 



5013 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: 



Laraine Ripley 
Sarah Regan 
Lucille Cynewski 
Sandra Fitch 
Jean Harding 
Linda Bohn 
Jean Sander 
Beverly Smith 
Jeanne Mikelonis 
Susan Thornton 
Alma Richards 
Barbara Palson 
Peter Hinkley 
LeRoy Boudette 
Elaine Boudette 
Eileen Melican 
Janet 0' Toole 
John Ganley 
Mary MairEtienne 
Muriel Harris 
Marion Bosselman 



Margaret Erdlen 
Carol Wilgus 
Shirley O'Donnell 
Thomas Kean 
Cynthia Cassie 
Olga Harrington 
Jane McGinnis 
Gladys Forsythe 
Nancy Franke 
Kasia Ballou 
Gail Nyren 
Sandra Pimentel 
John L. DeMartino 
Thomas McGinnis 
Lynn Randolph 
Weston Kolsti 
Margaret Bernick 
Phyllis Wilmarth 
Maybelle Maguire 
Florence Roberts 



Roberta Kolsti 
Barbara Armstrong 
Deidre Doherty 
Jessie Portmann 
Laurene Hinkley 
Stephanie Beck 
Edna Hinkley 
Margaret Marr 
Anna Murphy 
Elizabeth Ippoliti 
Marie Kilmer 
Richard DeSorgher 
Phyllis Roberts 
Phyllis Ripley 
Mary Lovell 
Clara DeNucci 
Joan Bussow 
Barbara Connors 
Elmer Portmann 
Virginia Cusack 



240 



After the results were publicly announced, the ballots, tally sheets, 
and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as pre- 
scribed by law. 

A true copy attest: 

Money J. ?n.(u>to¥i 

Town Clerk 



241 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWNOFMEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1976 



243 



ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The policy of the Board of Assessors in the past has been to revalue 
every ten years. This keeps the values in their proper balance. The first 
revaluation was in 1957, the second in 1968. From your standpoint as tax- 
payers, you will fall into three groups. One of these will continue to pay 
his fair share of the tax burden, the other will continue to pay more than 
his fair share of the tax burden, while the third group will continue to pay 
less than his fair share of the tax burden. We will, therefore, be submit- 
ting an article at Town Meeting relating to the updating of our 1968 values 
to conform to the recent court decision that mandated full fair cash value. 

The Board, at this time, would like to add a special tribute to a most 
loyal and dedicated member of our Assessors' staff for the past seventeen 
years, Gwendolen (Gwennie) Suereth, who this past summer retired. We wish her 
good health and many years of happiness in retirement. 

The Assessors would like to welcome two new members to our staff, 
Marie Bohner (full time) and Susan Thornton (half time) . They will ably 
assist all taxpayers with their individual problems throughout the year. 

Our customary report follows: 

Appropriations $7,006,596.10 

Amount for Tax Title 200.00 

Total offsets 18,903.62 

$7,025,699.72 

State Assessments 139,011.10 

County Assessments 191,480.52 

Overlay 61,737.64 

Gross Amount to be raised $7,417,928.98 

Estimated Receipts and Available 

Funds 2,927,367.79 

Net Amount to be Raised $4,490,561.19 

Real Property Valuations 70,891,995.00 

Personal Property Valuations 1,888,550.00 

Total Property Valuation $72,780,545.00 



244 



Tax Rate 

Real Property Tax 

Personal Property Tax 

Total Taxes Levied on Property 

Water Betterments 

Water Liens 



$ 61.70 

4,374,037.60 

116,523.59 



$4,490,561.19 



2,212.77 
15,167.97 
Respectfully submitted. 



M^lvMe, J. M^^e^ 

RogoA E. Ha/idy 

Jo-iep/i S. K2.nnQ,dy ' 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS OF MEDFIELD 




-%f^^^^ 



'^ 



GWEN SUERETH HONORED UPON HER RETIREMENT 

Photo by Ann Thompson 



245 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 





7-1-75 


AUDIT ADJUSTMENTS 6-30-76 


TOTAL 


LEVY OF 


BALANCE 
9.50 


& COLLECTED 


BALANCE 
.00 


BALANCE 


1969 


9.50 




1970 


54.05 


(12.45) 


66.50 




1971 


88.83 


10.45 


78.38 




1972 


841.99 


500.67 


341.32 




1973 


376.21 


74.13 


302.08 




1974 


170.00 


87.50 


82.50 




1975 


813.94 


401.38 


412.56 




1976 





108,080.82 


1,509.80 


2,793.14 






REAL ESTATE TAXES 




1966 


8.00 


.00 


8.00 




1967 


56.55 


.00 


56.55 




1968 


249.57 


166.50 


83.07 




1969 


909.84 


103.06 


806.78 




1970 


1,382.60 


(158.31) 


1,540.91 




1971 


3,274.46 


3,006.36 


268.10 




1972 


3,042.25 


475.82 


2,566.43 




1973 


10,103.84 


6,272.67 


3,831.17 




1974 


4,967.51 


1,315.56 


3,651.95 




1975 


60,281.99 


43,139.14 


17,142.85 




1976 





4,154,290.82 


106,465.64 


136,421.45 




WATER LIENS ADDED TO 


TAXES 




1967 


65.76 


.00 


65.76 




1969 


63.59 


.00 


63.59 




1970 


(293.64) 


(350.88) 


57.24 




1971 


7.47 


7.47 


.00 




1972 


(142.53) 


(142.53) 


.00 




1973 


(179.88) 


(244.72) 


64.84 




1975 


288.84 


117.72 


171.12 




1976 





7,675.88 


504.96 


927.51 




MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 


TAXES 




1968 


10.45 


10.45 


.00 




1969 


5.08 


5.08 


.00 




1970 


671.03 


241.20 


429.83 




1971 


616.08 


468.13 


147.95 




1972 


294.07 


104.59 


189.48 




1973 


2,167.21 


1,838.58 


328.63 




1974 


11,099.92 


10,246.78 


853.14 




1975 


55,042.67 


51,637.86 


3,404.81 




1976 




166,030.98 


105,165.37 


110,519.21 


This 


report is for the 


fiscal year ending 


, June 30, 1976. 


Massachusetts 



Bureau of Accounts Audit made May 22, 1976. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ChoAlo^ H. RayneA, Jn.. , Collector of Taxes 



246 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



For the Period of July 1, 1975 - June 30, 1976 
RECEIPTS 



Balance Cash on Hand July 1, 1975 

Taxes : 

1975-76 Real Estate & Property Tax $4,229,000.97 

Previous Years Taxes 55,574.48 

Motor Vehicle Excise 370,522.07 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 6.85 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 172,216.00 

Abatements to Veterans, Widows 3,441.64 

Lottery 55,657.29 

State Tax-Local Aid 1,257,411.67 



$ 396,002.50 



Licenses & 
Alcoholic 
Police 
Building 
Gas 

Plumbing 
Wiring 
Hawkers & 

Court Fines 



Permits: 
& Beverage 



Peddlers 



Grants from State, County & Federal GovtJ 
Federal Rev. Sharing & Comm. Dev. 
Schools-Building Asst. 
Schools-Other 
Library 
Highways 
Other 
Dog Fund 
Gifts from Individuals 

Other General Revenue: 
Tailings 

Special Assessments: 
Water 



4,111.00 
569.25 

6,440.21 
678.00 

2,030.50 

2,200.00 
30.00 



151,570.00 

149,195.97 

263,863.35 

7,862.88 

49,223.97 

10,805.01 

1,613.95 

20,010.00 



16,058.96 
1,857.50 



654,145.13 

834.21 

2,681.40 



Departmental Revenue: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Health 
Sanitation 
Highways- St ate 
Veterans Services 
School-Sale of Lunches 
School-Athletic Account 



17,367.80 
8,783.87 
3,054.50 
2,500.00 

35,268.25 

6,680.25 

124,310.25 

5,622.70 



247 



Departmental Revenue Cont. 
School-Other 
Library 
Recreation 

Bicentennial Committee 
Ambulance 
Historical Commission 

Water Department : 

Sale of Water & Services 
Water Liens 



13,955.81 
2,305.44 
2,199.50 
4,437.00 
4,266.00 
1.40 



112,410.13 
7,914.25 



230,752.77 



120,324.38 



Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots & Graves 



2,404.00 



Interest: 
Deposits 

Taxes & Assessments 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Investment Funds 
Library 
Cemetery 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Sewer 



36,361.60 
8,227.12 
399.76 
427.08 
4,687.13 
6,130.07 
8,079.74 



65,322.29 



Loans : 

Noon Hill & Sewer 
Premium on Loans 



1,297,400.00 
128.80 



1,297,528.80 



Agency & Trust Funds: 
Federal Withholding Tax 
State 

Group Insurance 
County & Teachers' Retirement 
Union Dues-Teachers & Custodians 
Teachers' Ins. & Credit Union 
Dog Licenses 
Perpetual Care Funds 



595,263.35 
181,653.28 

87,778.19 
187,379.01 

18,275.34 

110,127.50 

3,519.60 



Investment : 

Stabilization Fund 
Available Funds 
Sewer Funds 
Accrued Interest 



200,000.00 

4,500,000.00 

170,000.00 

1,398.44 



4,871.398.44 



Federal Revenue Sharing 

Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 



$15,125,844.57 



248 



EXPENDITURES 7/1/75 - bl?>0/16 



General Government : 
Selectmen 
Executive 
Accountant 
Treasurer 
Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 

Elections & Registration 
Planning 
Warrant 
Appeals 
Personnel 
Bi-Centennial 
Historical Commission 
Town Hall 
Town Hall Plaza, Renov. Parking 



1,832.01 

105,894.09 

11,118.52 

7,046.17 

7,653.99 

15,671.51 

3,777.00 

8,362.50 

8,474.25 

17,457.26 

62.88 

881.20 

621.35 

9,276.91 

400.00 

38,323.42 

18,704.99 



$255,558.05 



Public Safety: 
Police 
Fire 

Building 
Plumbing 
Gas 

Wiring 
Tree 

Insect Pest 
Mosquito 
Dutch Elm 
School Traffic 
Sealer 
Dog 

Civil Defense 
Police Detail 
Ambulance 



282,794.86 

61,868.38 

9,394.62 

2,324.70 

1,099.88 

3,320.82 

9,631.61 

2,481.66 

2,762.40 

2,620.13 

11,753.56 

315.00 

10,192.00 

1,207.44 

8,361.74 

6,429.88 



416,558.68 



Health & Sanitation: 
Public & Mental Health 
Outreach 

Sewers-Operation 
Sewers 
Garbage 
Sanitary Landfill 



16,708.07 
6,000.00 
71,652.90 
229,342.35 
18,000.00 
37,183.14 



378,886.46 



Highways : 
Highways 
Sidewalks 
Snow 

Traffic Markings 
Street Lighting 
Town Garage 



200,639.92 

1,999.42 

64,650.16 

76,475.82 

26,709.69 

7,550.10 



378,025.11 



Veterans' Services: 

Veterans' Administration 
Veterans' Benefits 



2,266.75 



7,275.35 



249 



Schools : 
Schools 

Regional Vocational School 
Cafeteria 

Athletic Association 
Custodian Detail 
Titles I, II 
Vocational Education 
Adult Education 
School Planning & Building 
School - Special Articles 



4,146,230.99 

52,729.92 

174,695.26 

5,217.30 

1,051.08 

85,326.59 

3,634.68 

9,823.99 

129.40 

11,112.41 



4,489,951.62 



Library: 

Library Administration 
Library - Federal Grant 



35,834.49 
4,107.82 



39,942.31 



Water & Cemetery: 
Water 

Water - Federal Revenue Sharing 
Cemetery 



153,634.29 
64,064.15 



234,733.11 



Insurance : 

Group Insurance 
Vehicle Liability 
Workmen's Compensation 
Property & Liability 



83,805.24 

7,009.00 

11,711.00 

15,613.00 



118,138.24 



Town Debt: 

Temporary Anticipation Loans 
Maturing Debt 
Interest on Debt 



225,000.00 
493,625.00 
239,994.13 



958,619.13 



Miscellaneous : 

Parks & Recreation 

County Retirement 

Town Report 

Memorial Day, Veterans 

Council on Aging 

Conservation Land Purchases 

Conservation Commission 



92,460.30 

58,652.22 

4,468.17 

867.00 

2,997.77 

677,069.34 

6,461.08 



842,975.88 



Refunds : 

Taxes - Personal & Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Water 



10,454.29 

10,147.41 

23.00 

25.00 

209.94 



20,859.64 



State and County Assessments: 
State Audit 
Parks & Reservations 
Mass. Bay Transit Authority 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Metro. Air Pollution Control 
Metro. Area Planning Council 
Court Judgments 
County Tax 
County Hospital Assessment 



81.50 

43,221.86 

72,449.71 

953.55 

635.57 

1,264.20 

5,052.46 

109,092.77 

23,480.77 



256,232.39 



250 



Trust & Agency Funds: 
Dog Licenses - County 
Federal Withholding Taxes 
State Withholding Taxes 
Group Insurance 
Retirement Fund 
Annuities, Credit Union, Dues 
Meals Tax 

Perpetual Care Funds 
Peters Fund 



3,455.25 

595,263.35 

194,418.66 

85,324.66 

163,286.36 

121,667.54 

430.00 

3,900.00 

65.00 



1,167,810.82 



Investment: 

Available Funds 
Stabilization Funds 
Stabilization Savings 



,200,000.00 

100,000.00 

7,337.08 



4,307,337.0^ 



Total Expenditures 

Balance at end of Year - General 

Balance at end of Year - Federal Revenue Sharing 



13,872,903.88 

1,003,393.96 

249,546.73 



Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 



$15,125,844.57 



BALANCE SHEET - June 30, 1976 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 



$4,301,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit: 

Junior-Senior High School 
Dale Street School Addition 
Elementary (Intermediate) School 
Elm Street (Wheelock) School 
Sewer Extension 
Sewer Project 



$300,000.00 

175,000.00 

800,000.00 

1,105,000.00 

30,000.00 

1.565,000.00 



3,975,000.00 



Inside Debt Limit: 

Street Sewer Design - Longmeadow 
Noon Hill Land Acquisition 



46,000.00 
280,000.00 



326,000.00 



Total Loans 



$4,301,000.00 



251 



JENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1976 
ASSETS 



Cash in Banks and Office 
Invested Funds 



$1,252,940.69 
500,000.00 



Accounts Receivable: 



Personal Property Taxes: 
Levy of 1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1975 
1976 



54.05 
88.83 
341.32 
302.08 
495.06 
,509.80 



2,791.14 



Real Estate Taxes 
Lev>' of 1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1975 
1976 



8.00 

56.55 

83.07 

890.84 

1,361,10 

271.03 

2,449.33 

3,679.11 

21,577.69 



133,228.08 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes : 
Levy of 1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 



437.48 

74.88 

141.37 

264.55 

1,016.04 

3,379.41 



110,211,60 



Special Assessments: 

Unapportioned Water Betterments 
Added to Taxes 
Water Betterments: 
Levy of 1967 

1970 

1972 

1975 
Committed Interest 

Special Taxes in Litigation 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Departmental Accounts Receivable: 
Ambulance 

Cemetery Care & Sale of Lots 
Police Off Duty Detail 



20,949.71 




54.24 




7,816.29 




25.11 




77.38 




313.11 


29,235.84 




3,353.01 


9,507.77 




525.25 


10,033.02 


9,314.35 




5,281.00 




916.44 


15,511.79 



252 



Water: 

Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1967 

1969 

1974 

1976 

1977 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Sales and Use Tax 



65.76 

63.59 

308.99 

387.24 

14,495.37 

82,921.58 

5,741.11 

733.15 



104,716.79 



Sewer : 

Septic Waste Disposal Fees 



355.00 



Aid to Highways : 
State 
County 

Aid to Sewer: 

Aid to Conservation: 
Federal 
State 

Loans Authorized: 

Smith Pumping Station 

Sewers 

Conservation (Noon Hill) 

Unprovided for : 

State Parks & Reservations 
County Hospital Tax 
Teachers Assn. Dues Agency Acct. 
Land Takings 



5,624.74 
1,422.94 



7,047.6! 





630,550 


00 


170,000.00 






386,400.00 


556,400 


00 


1,400.00 






5,624,000.00 






871,450.00 


6,496,850 


00 


450.19 






2,956.28 






.10 






518.53 


3,925 


10 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$9,857,149.74 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Temporary Loans : 

In Anticipation of Federal & State Aided Projects: 



Sewer 
Conservation 



$ 190,000.00 



746,400.00 



State and County Assessments: 
M.B.T.A. 

Metropolitan Air Pollution District 
Norfolk Mosquito Control 
County Tax 
Chapter 766 



1,488.29 

227.57 

1,935.12 

65,464.13 



77,866.11 



Payroll Deductions: 

County Retirement Plan 
Teachers' Retirement 
Group Insurance 
School Annuities 



5,417.72 
31,642.58 
13,459.34 

7,841.47 



58,361.11 



253 



Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 

Agency : 
Meals Tax 
Water Sales Tax 
County Dog Licenses 

Tailings : 

Unclaimed Checks 

Trust Fund Income: 
Conservation 
Cemetery 
Library 

Premium on Loans : 



60.66 

97.75 

585.90 



277.58 

15,046.14 

1,941.40 



5,489.96 

744.31 
4,990.12 

17,265.12 
128.80 



Federal Grants: 

Revenue Sharing Funds 
Revenue Sharing Interest 
Titles I, II, III, V 
Occupational Education 
Special Federal Grant: Library 
Hud Grant - Metacomet Park 

Revolving Funds : 
School Cafeteria 
School Athletics 
Police Detail 
Custodian Detail 
Adult Education 

Appropriation Balances : 
Schools 
Conservation 
Water 
Sewer 
All Other 

Loans Authorized but Unissued 

Sale of Real Estate 



228,102.04 

21,444.69 

21,475.61 

26,901.55 

72.18 



17,236.16 

797.11 

94.50 

185.56 

777.32 



116,850.41 
172,624.91 
158,333.01 
21,733.38 
116,729.78 



307,996.07 



19,090.65 



586,271.49 

6,496,850.00 

3,000.00 



Receipts Reserved for Appropriations 
Highway Road Machinery Fund 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1968 
1970 
1972 
1973 
1975 
1976 



6,586.00 
4,724.82 
475.73 
24,362.17 
4,793.36 
6,687.99 



498.50 
1,535.89 



47,630.07 



254 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Special Assessment 
Tax Title and Possession 
Special Taxes in Litigation 
Departmental 
Water 

Water Sales Tax Revenue 
Sewer Revenue 
Aid to Highways Revenue 
Aid to Sewer Revenue 



110,211.60 

29,235.84 

10,033.02 

3,353.01 

15,511.79 

103,158.06 

733.15 

355.00 

7,047.68 

440,550.00 



720,189.15 



Water Liens : Commitment Short Reported 
Surplus Revenue 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



474.84 



$9,857,149.74 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



PRINCIPAL 



Balance June 30, 1976 



$395,446.41 



Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 



Library : 

Granville F. Dailey Trust 

Clara S. Littledale Trust 

Library Trust Funds 

Library - Dailey Income Trust 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Stabilization Funds 
Conservation Fund 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 
Moses Ellis Post //117 G.A.R. 



$ 89 
2 
9 
6 



271.70 

653.50 

000.00 

.330.87 

92,080.00 

180,536.40 

7,622.56 



7,951.38 



387,495.03 



7,951.38 



The foregoing report is an account of the financial transactions and 
standing of the Town of Medfield for the twelve month fiscal period ending 
June 30, 1976. 

Michael J. SalLivan 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



255 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1975 - $ 1,627,118.01 

Available Funds 

Receipts 1976 - including investments 13,495,128.42 

Disbursements 1976 - including investments (13 , 374 ,912 .57 ) 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1976 - Available Funds $ 1,747,333.86 

Escrowed Funds 137,774. 39 

Total Cash December 31, 1976 - $ 1,885,108.25 

Including Savings & Investments 

STATEMENT OF SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 

General Fund - Savings $ 807,227.41 
Stabilization Fund - Savings /Investments 137,774.39 

Sewer Project - Savings 53,354.35 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds - Savings 236 ,861. 29 

Total Savings /Investments December 31, 1976 $ 1,235,217.44 

INTEREST EARNED ON SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 28,350.43 

Stabilization Fund 10,807.99 

Sewer Project Funds 354.35 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 12 ,124. 48 

Interest Earned 1976 $ 51,637.25 
Interest Earned but not received 1976 749. 65 

Total Interest Earned 1976 $ 52,386.90 

FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1975 - Checking $ 2,392.00 

Savings 135,774.81 

Distribution received 1976 143,470.00 

Interest Earned on Savings 1976 12 ,124. 48 

Total Revenue Sharing Funds 1976 $ 293,761.29 

Transferred to Article 4 - Voted Special Town 

Meeting October 18, 1976 $ (20,900.00) 

Transferred to Article 16 - Voted Special Town 

Meeting October 18, 1976 (35,000.00 )$ (55,900.00) 

Cash in Banks December 31, 1976 - Checking $ 1,000.00 

Savings 236,861.29 

$ 237,861.29 



256 



For the year ended December 31, 1976 the cash position of the Town of 
Medfield was not as high as in previous years. Interest earned was greatly 
reduced for the second consecutive year mostly as a result of stabilized 
interest rates on investments. 

On the positive side, I can again report that we have not borrowed in 
anticipation of revenue since July 11, 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edwa/id F. Boaa^JX, M. 
Town Treasurer 



257 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department or Board 
Board of Assessors 

Board of Assessors 

Board of Assessors 

Board of Assessors 

Board of Health 
Board of Health 



Library Trustees 



Park & Recreation 
Commission 



Planning Board 



Police Department 



School Department 



Board of Selectmen 



Purpose 
Tax Mapping 



Property & land 
Appraising 

Tax Billing 



Consultant 

Wayne C. Carlson 

88 Dover Road, Millis 



John Ormsby 
55 Parker St 



Westwood 



Tyrashare, Inc. 

47 Congress Street 

Salem, MA 



Amount 



$1,500. 



$5,500. 



$2,800 



$5. /hour 



$4,800. 



Advisory capacity Gwendolen D. Suereth 
regarding office 10 Rhododendron Avenue 
procedures & record Medfielcf, MA 
keeping. 

Consulting sanitary William R. Domey 
engineer 52 Sherman Bridges Rd. 

Way land, MA 01778 



Outreach worker - Medfield Committee, Inc. $9,000, 
furnishing youth P. 0. Box 225 
counseling and out- Medfield, MA 
reach health service 
and homemaking serv. 



Upgrading 1966 
Architectural 
plans for the 
Library. 

Swim pond testing 
& consulting and 
lab fees for same. 



Harry Gulesian & Asso. 
10 Newbury Street 
Boston, MA 



Dr. Jerome B. Carr 
1717 Waban Street 
Wellesley, MA 02181 



To assist School Dr. Richard L. Wendler 
Committee in its 320 Bowman Drive 
search for a Super- Woodbury, N. J. 
intendent of Schools. 



Landfill engineer- 
ing and inspection 
services. 



C. E. Maguire, Inc 
31 Canal Street 
Providence, R. I. 



$2,500, 



$5,060. 



$4,923 



Reviewing pre- Whitman & Howard, Inc. 
liminary and defin- 45 Williams Street 
itive subdivision Wellesley, MA 
plans. 



Architectural ser- Rich, Lang & Cote $14,250. 
vices in connection Newton Upper Falls, MA 
with Police Station 
Construction. 



$1,500. 



$3,900. 



258 



Department or Board 
Board of Registrars 



Purpose 



Consultant 



Services provided; L.H.S. Associates 
annual census list, 3 Main Street 
dog list, street Andover, MA 
list, alphabetical 
list, office resident 
census list, voter 
lists, updating of 
the automated file. 



Amount 
.15/resident 



Water & Sewerage 
Board 



Oversee construe- Weston & Sampson Eng. 
tion of Longmeadow 10 High Street 
sewers. Boston, MA 



$28,000, 



Water & Sewerage 
Board 



Design for Phase I, Weston & Sampson 
Step II and Design 
Phase II, Step II, 
application for 
street sewers. 



$124,000. 



Water & Sewerage 
Board 



Water Master Plan 
Up-date. 



Walter Amory 
15 Depot Street 
Duxbury , MA 



$35,000. 



The above information is printed in accordance with Article II, Section 21 of 
the Town of Medfield By-laws. These contracts will be made available for re- 
view upon request. 



259 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Camille & Irene Roy $200.00 

Helen Hoisington $100.00 

Francis & Josephine Roche $200.00 

Arthur & Shirley Owens $600.00 

Ralph & Barbara Chisholm $200.00 

John & Lillian Senger $100.00 

Charles & Rita Higgins $400.00 

John & Priscilla Mahoney $200.00 

Robert & Kathleen Mitchell $100.00 

Rennie & Katherine Spring $200.00 

Douglas & Barbara Stevenson $100.00 

George & Phyllis Gagliani $400.00 

Lindsay & Alice Ripley $200.00 

Osborne & Anita Daniels $100.00 

TOTAL $3100.00 



260 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
twenty-eighth day of March A.D., 1977, at 6:00 o'clock a.m., then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator, one Trustee of the Public Library, one member of the 
Park and Recreation Commission and one member of the Housing Autho- 
rity for one year. 

One Trustee of the Public Library for two years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Collector of Taxes, two 
members of the Park and Recreation Commission, all for three years. 

One member of the Housing Authority for four years. 

One member of the Planning Board for five years. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock a.m. and shall be closed at 
8:00 o'clock p.m. 

On Monday, the twenty-fifth day of April A.D., 1977 commencing at 
7:30 p.m., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kings- 
bury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1977, or 
such other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1977, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 



261 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of 
the following elected officers: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Park and Recreation Commission 

Planning Board 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classifications of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan so that it 

reads as follows: 



CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 
SALARIED POSITIONS 



Police Department 
Police Chief 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 
Dog Officer 



Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



$15,170 

13,457 

10,951 

9,466 



14,017 
11,720 



12,620 



$20,187 
14,722 
13,457 
10,316 



Streets, Water and Sewer Department 



Superintendent 

Fire Department 

Chief 

Executive Department 

Executive Secretary 
Administrative Secretary 



16,384 



13,125 



15,777 
9,013 



9,511 



10,039 



10,594 



21,845 



16,875 



24,272 
11,182 



Library 
Librarian 
Asst. Librarian 
Children's Librarian 



7,026 


7,438 


7,800 


8,188 


8,750 


3,625 


3,825 


4,044 


4,268 


4,500 


3,625 


3,825 


4,044 


4,268 


4,500 



262 



HOURLY POSITIONS 

Listed below is a 12-grade, 5-step hourly structure, in which all hourly 
graded positions are slotted. 



Grade 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$687 minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$572 minimum per season 
Laborer Intern (PTT) 

May be paid minimum wage 
Laborer (PTT) 

GRADE 2 
Presently no jobs 



Minimum 


2nd Step : 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


2.49 


2.63 


2.77 


2.90 


3.06 


2.72 


2.86 


3.00 


3.14 


3.28 


2.94 


3.06 


3.19 


3.37 


3.57 


3.19 


3.32 


3.43 


3.63 


3.86 


3.25 


3.43 


3.63 


3.81 


4.00 


3.32 


3.57 


3.76 


3.94 


4.26 


3.76 


4.00 


4.26 


4.50 


4.74 


4.18 


4.45 


4.69 


4.93 


5.25 


4.45 


4.69 


4.93 


5.25 


5.55 


4.69 


4.93 


5.18 


5.50 


5.82 


4.80 


5.13 


5.44 


5.75 


6.07 


5.13 


5.44 


5.75 


6.07 


6.43 


HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 








Part Time /Temporary - 


(PTT) 






Regular 


- (R) 










GRADE 7 







Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 
Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 

GRADE 8 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 
Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 

GRADE 9 



GRADE 3 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 
Library Sr. Aide (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 

GRADE 4 

Skilled Laborer (R) 
Secretary (PTT) 

GRADE 5 



Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 

GRADE 10 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator- in-Charge (R) 

GRADE 11 



Collector /Bookkeeper /Secretary (R) 

GRADE 6 

Deputy Collector/Bookkeeper (R) 
Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 



Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator- in-Charge (R) 
Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control (PTT) 

GRADE 12 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 



263 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
Part Time/Temporary 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Asst. Waterfront Director 
Deputy Collector 
Asst. Dog Officer 

Ambulance Serviceman 

Fire 



$522 per year 

$1,488 to $1,942 per year 

$92 to $127 per week, $801 min. per 

Fee season 

$229 per year and $4.26 per hr. when on 

duty 
$3.04 per run, subject to $29 min. per mo, 



Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Building Inspector 
Acting Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Acting Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Acting Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Acting Wiring Inspector 
Health Agent 
Street Inspector 
Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$791 per year 
$265 per year 
$201 per year 
$201 per year 

$103 to $157 per week 

$113 to $148 per week 

$2.97 per hr. 

$75 to $92 per week 

$152 per year 

$364 per year 

$256 per year 

$3,010 to $7,524 per year 

$3.25 to $5.25 per hr. 

$1,701 per year 

$7.52 per inspection 

Annual minimum $1,456 
Annual minimum $194 
Annual minimum $402 
Annual minimum $73 
Annual minimum $1,190 
Annual minimum $273 
Annual minimum $661 
Annual minimum $194 
7.52 per inspection 
3.95 per hour 
7.52 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules Hourly Grade Listings as 
follows: 

Grade 11 - Remove: Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator- in-Charge (R) 
Grade 12 - Add: Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator-in-Charge (R) 



or take any action relative thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 



264 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of install- 
ing brick sidewalks, old fashioned street lighting and/or landscaping improve- 
ments on North Street between Main Street and Frairy Street, or take any other 
action relating thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or 
transfer a sum of money for the purpose of resurfacing North Street from the 
Dover Town Line to Winter Street and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer, and/or borrow the sum of $3,500. for the purpose of installing 270 
feet of drainage in Mitchell Street between North Street and Mitchell Place 
and 200 feet of drainage in North Street from Mitchell Street southerly for 
200 feet, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of purchas- 
ing equipment for the Street Department and Park Department as listed and 
authorize the Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price equipment to 
be replaced: 





To Be Acquired 


Department 


Trade 


1. 


Street Sweeper 


Street 


1969 Wayne Sweeper 


2. 


2 yard Front End Loader 


Street 


1970 Hough 60 


3. 


Field Aerator 


Park 


None 


4. 


Sprayer 


Park 


None 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow, and/or transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the purpose 
of installing an eight (8) inch water main in West Street from Harding Street 
southwesterly for a distance of approximately four hundred and fifty (450) 
feet or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of making 
improvements to the Medfield Town Hall, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



265 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Tovm will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment of 
a prior fiscal year bill for Property & Liability Insurance Account No. 
A155-03, 200 operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to provide for payment of 
a prior fiscal year bill for Parks & Recreation Account No. A107-00, 200 
operations, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow, and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose 
of replacing a six (6) inch water main in Bridge Street from approximately 
Essex Road northwesterly for a distance of approximately twenty-five hundred 
(2,500) feet, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to name the bridges over the Stop 
River as follows: 

Noon Hill Street Frairy's Bridge 

Causeway Street Causeway Bridge 

South Street Thurston's Bridge 

and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the County Commissioners to name 
the bridges spanning the Charles River as follows: 

Orchard Street Upper Bridge 

Main Street Turnpike Bridge 

Bridge Street The Great Bridge 

North Meadows Road Death's Bridge 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing a tone alert system for use of the police, fire and ambulance 
departments or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing a radio console in the police station on North Street, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 



266 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote the following: 

WHEREAS, at the Special Town Meeting of May 15, 1972, the Town voted, 

"That the Selectmen notify the County Commissioners that the 
people of the Town of Medfield demand a moratorium on further 
land takings and lay outs until a complete review of the road 
system in Medfield is completed excluding new Route 27 now in 
progress." and, 

WHEREAS, the review of the road system in Medfield has been completed. 

It is the consensus of this meeting that the moratorium on further land 
takings and layouts be ended, 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and Planning Board) 
ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote the following resolution: 

It is the consensus of this meeting that where lands are taken 
from the Conservation Commission of the Town by the Federal 
Government for the Charles River Watershed project, sums equal 
to those received by the Town for such takings should be appro- 
priated to the Conservation Commission to acquire other conserva- 
tion lands and the Conservation Commission should record the 
receipt by the Town of all such sums for reference to future 
town meetings, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of 
constructing sewer interceptors and associated street sewers pursuant to de- 
sign plans prepared under the authorization of Article 26 of the 1975 Annual 
Town Meeting and to see if the Town will authorize the Water and Sewer Depart- 
ment and/or the Board of Selectmen to enter into any contracts necessary for 
the purpose of this article and to apply for and receive Federal, State or 
other funds for said purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of micro- 
filming town records, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Eastmount Road from station 6+63.96 to 11+29.60 
Essex Road from station 0+0 to station 4+45 
Hemlock Lane from station 0+00 to station 1+97.50 
Indian Hill Road from station 38+00 to station 53+00 
Mohawk Street from station 0+0 to station 6+02.17 
Penobscot Street from station 0+0 to station 11+92.43 
Pilgrim Lane from station 0+30.35 to station 13+58 

267 



as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purpose of provid- 
ing recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Conservation Fund and determine in what manner the money will be raised, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and 
Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to appoint a local Growth Policy Committee, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by 
adding to Section 6.2, "Table of Area Regulations," the following: 

6.2.16 Setback in the Table of Area Regulations shall not apply 
to fences. 

or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 13.9, "Board of 
Appeals," of the Zoning By-law by deleting the words, "one associate member" 
and adding the words, "two associate members," or take any action relative 
thereto. 

(Board of Appeals on Zoning) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
the Council on Aging, A134-00, 200 operations account for the purpose of 
defraying costs of personal visits to ascertain needs of elderly within the 
Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of providing 
recreational facilities on town-owned land off Hospital Road and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and/or Park and Recreation Commission to enter into 
state and/or federal contracts and to accept state and/or federal grants for 
said purpose, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 



268 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and to 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised to observe a homecoming 
celebration and to authorize the Selectmen to appoint a committee to plan the 
observance, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws by adding to 
Article IV a Section 29, Regulations for Yard Sales, Flea Markets and Estate 
Sales as follows; 

SECTION A - PURPOSE: It is the intent of these rules and regulations to 
provide a mechanism for allowing, subject to reasonable and appropriate 
controls, certain types of activities having to do with the sale of 
second-hand articles within the community while at the same time pre- 
serving the residential atmosphere of the various neighborhoods in Town. 

It is further the intent of these rules and regulations to enhance 
traffic and pedestrian safety through the provision of appropriate re- 
strictions on the placing of signs and advertising devices on utility 
poles, traffic signs, street signs and public trees. 

It is also the intent of these rules and regulations to assure that 
activities relating to the sale of second-hand articles by persons or 
groups customarily engaged in such activities as a business shall be 
limited to those locations within Town which the Town, through its Zoning 
Bylaws, has set aside for the conduct of businesses. 

SECTION B - DEFINITIONS; For the purposes of these rules and regulations 
the following words and terms shall have and include the following 
respective meanings. 

Flea Market - A temporary market where old or used articles 
are sold. 

Yard Sale - The sale for not more than two consecutive days 
of old or used articles upon residential pro- 
perty where the material to be sold originates 
from said property. 

Estate Sale - The sale of the contents of a dwelling by an 
agent or agents acting on behalf of the owner. 

Rummage Sale - (See Flea Market) 

Garage Sale - (See Yard Sale) 

Porch Sale - (See Yard Sale) 

SECTION C - REQUIREMENTS: 

FLEA MARKETS 

1. Business and Industrial Zoning Districts 

a. Flea Markets may be held in a Business or Industrial 
District pursuant to a permit granted by the Board of 
Selectmen. No material for sale shall be displayed 
on any public or private way. Permits may be issued 



269 



subject to conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen 
to be necessary or advisable. 

b. No sign or advertising device shall be placed within 
any street right-of-way, including free standing signs, 
or any sign affixed to street signs, traffic and regu- 
latory or warning signs or any utility poles within 
such right-of-way. No such sign or advertising device 
shall be placed on any public tree. 

c. Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises 
for not more than five (5) days. 

2. All Other Zoning Districts 

a. Flea Markets may be held in any other Zoning District 
pursuant to a permit granted by the Board of Selectmen 
subject to conditions hereinafter set forth. 

a.(l) Flea Market is under the sponsorship of a 
Medfield based non-profit organization or 
corporation whose purpose is to provide 
service or charitable work. 

(2) The number of Flea Markets shall be limited 
to one per calendar year per organization 
or corporation. 

(3) No person customarily engaged in the busi- 
ness of conducting Flea Markets shall parti- 
cipate in any Flea Market within any Zoning 
District except Business and Industrial Dis- 
tricts unless the sponsoring organization or 
corporation has received a special permit 
from the Zoning Board of Appeals. No mate- 
rial for sale shall be displayed on any 
public or private way. Permits may be 
issued subject to conditions deemed by the 
Board of Selectmen to be necessary or 
advisable. 

(4) No sign or advertising device shall be 
placed within any street right-of-way, in- 
cluding free standing signs, or any sign 
affixed to street signs, traffic regulatory 
or warning signs or any utility poles within 
such right-of-way. No such sign or adver- 
tising device shall be placed on any public 
tree. 

(5) Any authorized signs may be displayed on 
the premises for not more than five (5) 
days. 

(6) Such sale shall not exceed two (2) days* 
duration. 



YARD SALES 



1. Business and Industrial Zoning Districts 
270 



a. Yard Sales may be held in a Business or Industrial 
Zoning District pursuant to a permit issued by the 
Board of Selectmen. No material for sale shall be dis- 
played on any public way. Permits may be issued sub- 
ject to conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to 
be necessary or advisable. 

b. No sign or advertising device shall be placed within 
any street right-of-way, including free standing signs, 
or any sign affixed to street signs, traffic regulatory 
or warning signs, or any utility poles within such 
right-of-way. No such sign or advertising device shall 
be placed on any public tree. 

c. Any authorized signs may be displayed on the premises 
for not more than five (5) days. 

2. All Other Zoning Districts 

a. Yard sales may be held in any other Zoning District 
pursuant to a permit granted by the Board of Selectmen 
subject to the following conditions. 

a. (1) The number of yard sales an owner or resi- 
dent or qualified organization may conduct 
shall be limited to one per calendar year. 

(2) All material available for the sale shall 
originate from the premises on which the 
sale takes place. 

(3) No sign or advertising device shall be 
placed within any street right-of-way, in- 
cluding free standing signs, or any sign 
affixed to street signs, traffic and regula- 
tory warning signs or any utility poles 
within such right-of-way. No such sign or 
advertising device shall be placed on any 
public tree. 

(4) Any authorized signs may be displayed on the 
premises for not more than five (5) days. 

(5) No person customarily engaged in the business 
of conducting yard sales shall participate 
in any way in a yard sale directly or indi- 
rectly unless said yard sale is conducted on 
said person's own property and then, only 
providing none of the material is brought 

in from outside sources for purpose of 
resale. 

(6) Such sale shall not exceed two (2) days' 
duration. 

b. The Selectmen upon request may waive the requirement 
that all material to be sold originate from the pro- 
perty on which the sale is to take place provided that 
the sale is under the sponsorship of a Medfield based 
non-profit organization whose purpose is to provide 



271 



service or charitable work. 

ESTATE SALES; 

1. All Zoning Districts 

a. Estate Sales may be held pursuant to a permit granted by the 
Board of Selectmen subject to the following conditions. 

a. (1) All material available for sale shall originate 
from the premises on which the sale takes place. 

(2) No sign or advertising device shall be placed 
within any street right-of-way, including free 
standing signs, or any sign affixed to street 
signs, traffic and regulatory or warning signs 
or any utility poles within such right-of-way. 
No such sign or advertising device shall be 
placed on any public tree. 

(3) Any authorized signs may be displayed on the pre- 
mises for not more than five (5) days. 

(4) Such sale shall not exceed three (3) days' 
duration. 

SECTION D - PROCEDURE 

1. Any person, organization or corporation intending to conduct a 
Flea Market, Rummage Sale, Garage Sale, Yard Sale, Porch Sale, 
Estate Sale, or any similar activity by a different name shall 
make application for a permit to conduct such activity at the 
Board of Selectmen's office no less than ten (10) calendar days 
prior to the date of the proposed activity. 

2. If an application is favorably acted upon by the Board of Select- 
men or its designated representative, a permit shall be issued 
to the person, organization or corporation to conduct such 
activity and said permit shall be available at all times on the 
site during the term of the sale. 

SECTION E - FEES 

1. The fee for permits granted pursuant to these Rules and Regula- 
tions shall be according to the following schedule: 

Flea Market $10.00 

Rummage Sale 10.00 

Estate Sale 10.00 

Garage, Yard, Porch Sales, etc. 5.00 

The schedule above lists the most commonly used terms in des- 
cribing various sales dealing with second-hand articles. If 
different names are used to describe the sale of second-hand 
articles, the Selectmen in their sole discretion shall deter- 
mine which of the above terms most clearly describes the pro- 
posed activity and shall set the fee accordingly. 



272 



SECTION F - ENFORCEMENT 

1. The Police Department shall be responsible for enforcement of 
these rules and regulations and upon request of a police offi- 
cer, any person conducting any activity governed by these rules 
and regulations, shall make available for inspection by the 
police officer the permit granted by the Board of Selectmen. 

2. A person found by a police officer not to be in compliance with 
the rules and regulations as heretofore set forth shall, upon 
such police officer's order, cease such activity immediately or 

comply with the directive of the police officer to bring into 
conformity that portion of the activity which is deemed to be 
in violation of these rules and regulations. 

3. Signs or advertising devices in violation of these rules and 
regulations found to be affixed to any utility pole, street 
sign, traffic warning or regulatory signs within the right-of- 
way of any street shall be removed by any police officer 
observing same. 

4. Whoever violates any provisions of these rules and regulations 
shall forfeit and pay for each offense a fine not exceeding 

$25.00. 

SECTION G - GENERAL 

1. Nothing contained in these rules and regulations shall require 
the Board of Selectmen to issue a permit if, in its opinion, 
the public interest would be adversely affected by so doing. 

2. The Board of Selectmen may waive strict compliance with any of 
the above rules and regulations if after its examination of the 
facts in a particular case such waiver can be granted without 
derogating from the intent and purpose of these rules and 
regulations. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Health to estab- 
lish a Youth Counselling and Outreach Program subject to the approval of the 
Personnel Board and for this purpose appropriate a sum of money, and to deter- 
mine in what manner the money will be raised or do or act anything in rela- 
tion thereto. 

(Board of Health) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the use of the 
Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real and personal pro- 
perty within the Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 



273 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Tovm will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of 
conducting a field review and updating the assessing records of all property 
in the Town of Medfield as a first phase of a computor assessed tax equali- 
zation program, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept an amendment to the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District Agreement initiated and 
proposed by vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School Dis- 
trict Committee adopted on October 13, 1976 and entitled "Amendment No. 4 to 
the Agreement Establishing the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 
District," which proposed Amendment provides in substance for an additional 
category of apportioned costs called "outside special education costs" to 
include the net cost of all special education programs for school-age chil- 
dren which the District is required to provide under Chapter 766 of the Acts 
of 1972 as amended and which are not conducted by it within its regular 
educational facilities; that such "outside special education costs" shall not 
be included in the District's annual budget but shall be paid directly by the 
town which would have been responsible for the payment of such costs but for 
the fact that the school-age child was enrolled in the District's schools; 
and that any reimbursements or other receipts by the District on account of 
outside special operating costs shall be forwarded promptly by the District 
to the treasurer of the town concerned. 

(Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School District) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to in- 
struct Boston Edison Company to install a street light on pole 41/22 at Nebo 
Street and Hillcrest Road, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to install a street light on the following named pole, Pole No. 177 at Carol 
Ann Drive and Flintlocke Lane or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to order street lights on the following named poles: 

Cedar Lane - Pole //I, #3, #5, //7 
Scott Road - Pole #1 
Maplewood Road - Pole //I, //3, #5 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 



274 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to abandon a portion of an unused 
sewer easement dated August 24, 1886, and recorded with Norfolk Registry of 
Deeds, Book 581, Page 575, running over land now or formerly of Rebel L. 
Palumbo as described by deed of Helen F. Gilmore to Rebel L. Palumbo, recorded 
with Norfolk Registry of Deeds, Book 3160, Page 439, and by deed of Clark- 
Shaughnessy, Inc. to Rebel L. Palumbo, recorded with Norfolk Registry of 
Deeds, Book 5101, Page 318 and being shown on a Plan entitled "Plan of Land 
in Medfield.Mass. , Scale: 1" = 40', April 1953, by H. A. Kingsbury, Engineer," 
filed with Norfolk Registry of Deeds as No. 425 of 1953, Book 3160, Page 439, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of making 
drainage improvements in Bridge Street, or take any other action relating 
thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the town will vote to accept the following-named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Camille & Irene Roy Lot $200.00 

Helen Hoisington Lot 100.00 

Francis & Josephine Roche Lot 200.00 

Arthur & Shirley Owens Lot 600.00 

Ralph & Barbara Chisholm Lot 200.00 

John & Lillian Senger Lot 100.00 

Charles & Rita Higgins Lot 400.00 

John & Priscilla Mahoney Lot 200.00 

Robert & Kathleen Mitchell Lot 100.00 

Rennie & Katherine Spring Lot 200.00 

Douglas & Barbara Stevenson Lot 100.00 

George & Phyllis Gagliani Lot 400.00 

Lindsay & Alice Ripley Lot 200.00 

Osborne & Anita Daniels Lot 100.00 

$3100.00 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this first day of March_, A.D. , Nineteen Hundred 
and Seventy-seven. 

R. EdMOAd Bo^oAd 
HojiAij A. KdULzkoA 
W-WLlan R, R2,agan 

Selectmen of Medfield 



275 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 6 

Appointments by Board of Health 16 

Appointments by Collector 18 

Appointments by Fire Chief 18 

Appointments by Park & Recreation 17 

Appointments by Planning Board 17 

Appointments by Selectmen 7 

Appointments by Town Clerk 18 

Appointments by Town Moderator 17 

Appointments by Treasurer 19 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging , Council on 80 

Ambulance 42 

Anniversary Committee 103 

Appeals on Zoning , Board of 54 

Building Code Board of Appeals 84 

Central Business District Study Committee 93 

Civil Defense 43 

Community Gardens Committee 76 

Conservation Commission 65 

Development and Industrial Commission 91 

Dog Officer 89 

Fire Department 33 

Growth Policy Committee 55 

Health , Board of 66 

Historic District Study Committee 100 

Historical Commission 95 

Housing Authority 62 

Inspector of Animals 89 

Inspector of Buildings 82 

Inspector of Gasfittings 86 

Inspector of Plumbing 85 

Inspector of Wiring 85 

Jury List 112 

Library Trustees 57 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 53 

Memorial Library. 59 

Mental Health & Retardation Area Board 71 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County ^1 

Park & Recreation Commission ^5 

Planning Board ^8 

Police Department 3° 

Police Station Study Committee '^1 

School Planning & Building Committee HO 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 87 

Selectmen, Board of 22 

Streets , Water & Sewer , Superintendent of 29 

Tree Warden ^3 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 109 

Veterans ' Services , . . . . '9 

Water & Sewerage Department ^^ 

Youth Advisory Commission ' ' 

276 



INDEX 



Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Adult Education 155 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 146 

Athletic Director 156 

Buildings and Grounds Director 158 

Business Manager 154 

Dale Street School 140 

Ralph Wheelock School 142 

Enrollment Commentary •. 133 

Junior High School 144 

Graduation Exercises, High School 148 

Media Services , Director of . 152 

Memorial Elementary School 137 

School Committee 116 

School Lunch Program 157 

Special Services , Director of 151 

Superintendent of Schools 117 

Teachers' Directory 119 

TOWN CLERKS 'S RECORD: 

Births 163 

Marriages 167 

Deaths 172 

TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Warrant and Proceedings of Presidential Primary, March 2, 1976 174 

Annual Town Election, March 29, 1976 178 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 26, 1976 182 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, April 26, 1976 216 

Warrant and Proceedings of State Primary, September 14, 1976 220 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, October 18, 1976 224 

Warrant and Proceedings of Presidential Election, November 2, 1976.... 231 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1977 261 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 244 

Contracts for Professional Services 258 

Perpetual Care 260 

Tax Collector 246 

Town Accountant 247 

Treasurer 256 



277 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES